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Ways to Say Said Vocabulary Word Bank. 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very'. Three Telling Quotes About 'Very' Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.

45 ways to avoid using the word 'very'

~Mark Twain'Very' is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen. ~Florence KingSo avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy. A man is not very tired, he is exhausted. If you enjoyed this, you will love: To find out about our courses, Writers Write -how to write a book, or The Plain Language Programme - how to write for business, email news@writerswrite.co.za.

Persuasive Writing - Emotional vs Intellectual Words. I have written about persuasive writing in an article where I discuss Ethos, Logos, Pathos.

Persuasive Writing - Emotional vs Intellectual Words

Persuasive writers use words to convince the reader to listen or to act. I found this useful list of words in an interesting article called Common words that suck emotional power out of your content by John Gregory Olson. He explains how words have emotions attached to them, and that you should choose the correct ones for the response you want to elicit from your reader. Use these words if you want to get an emotional, rather than an intellectual, response from your readers. Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing. 600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary - Your students are bright, but they don’t always sound like it.

600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary -

Their diction is full of cliche and emaciated language that doesn’t reflect their inner voice, nor does it indicate their vocabulary level. You want your students to use specific language that demonstrates intended meaning rather than the first word that popped into their head, but you want to do more than hand them a thesaurus and tell them to “figure it out.” While the following graphics aren’t going to make that happen, they can certainly play a role if posted to your classroom blog, shared on a student-teacher pinterest page, hung on a classroom wall, or reformatted, printed, hole-punched, and stored in a student binder.

18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing. It’s a familiar scene: you’re slumped over your keyboard or notebook, obsessing over your character.

18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing

While we tend to agonize over everything from structure to backstory, it’s important to weigh how you write something too. A perfectly constructed world is flat on the page if you use feeble, common words. When you’re finished constructing your perfectly balanced world, do your writing a favor and take another pass to weed out these 18 haggard words. Good High on any list of most used English words is “good.” New Another of the common words in English is “new.” Long Much like “new,” “long” is spent, yet it doesn’t always register as such while you’re writing.

Old “Old” is certainly one of those common words that means more to readers if you’re specific about how old a subject is. Right “Right” is also among the common words that tends to slip through our writer filters. Different Small “Small” is another adjective that is too generic for writing as good as yours.

Large Next Young Never Things All. English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions. Idioms used by native speakers. Those of us who grew up with English as our first language have been exposed to idioms and idiomatic expressions for most of our lives.

Idioms used by native speakers

They may have confused us a little when we were children, but explanation and constant exposure not only increased our understanding of them, but likely drew them into our own vernacular. If you’re in the process of learning the English language, you may come across some of these and not be entirely sure what they mean. Here’s a list of 20 that you’re likely to come across fairly often: 1. A Chip on Your Shoulder No, this doesn’t mean that you’ve dropped part of your snack. 2. Like taking a HUGE bite of a sandwich that will fill your mouth up so much that you can’t move your jaw, this idiom implies that you’ve taken on more than you can handle successfully. 3. You can’t take anything with you when you die, so don’t bother hoarding your stuff or not using it except for “special occasions”. 4. 5. 6. To get married. 7. 8. This means “never”. 9. 10. Adjectives their opposites. Travelling by Taxi, Bus and Train - learn English,vocabulary.

"To Be" Idioms - learn English,idioms,english.