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English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions

English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions
The Cambridge dictionary defines an idiom as a group of words in a fixed order that have a particular meaning that is different from the meanings of each word understood on its own: For example To "have bitten off more than you can chew" is an idiom that means you have tried to do something which is too difficult for you.We have offered you a list of commonly used idioms from A to Z. Be about to do sth be going to do sth immediately I was about to phone him when he walked into the office. That’s about all/it Used to say that you have finished telling smb about sth and there is nothing to add ‘Anything else?’ ‘No, that’s about it for now’. Above Be/get above yourself behave as if you are better or more important than you really are She’s getting a bit above herself. Abreast Keep abreast of sth Make sure that you know all the most recent facts about a subject It is almost impossible to keep abreast of all the latest developments in computing. Accord Of your own accord without being asked or forced

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Idioms used by native speakers Those of us who grew up with English as our first language have been exposed to idioms and idiomatic expressions for most of our lives. They may have confused us a little when we were children, but explanation and constant exposure not only increased our understanding of them, but likely drew them into our own vernacular. If you’re in the process of learning the English language, you may come across some of these and not be entirely sure what they mean. Here’s a list of 20 that you’re likely to come across fairly often: 1. English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions Use the navigation above to browse our A-Z of English idioms … If you have a question about idioms, ask us about it in our Idioms Discussion Forum. If you know of an idiom that you would like to be listed here, please use our online form to suggest an idiom. Below are listed the latest 30 entries that have been added to our database of English idioms & idiomatic expressions. Subscribe to our idioms feed to keep up-to-date:

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Here’s a list of adjectives: 100+ Useful Expressions, Dialogs and Phrasal Verbs for SHOPPING! Whether you love shopping, or just shop when you need to, you can practice your English at the same time! Shopping is a great way to communicate with lots of different people, and it really helps to boost your confidence in speaking English! You might hesitate or make mistakes to begin with, if you’re a bit nervous, but that’s completely normal. You may even find it hard to understand what the shop assistant is saying to you, if you don’t understand all the words! If you familiarise yourself with the phrases and vocabulary in this blog, then you’ll know what you should expect to hear from the people you talk to on your shopping spree. It’ll make shopping a more enjoyable experience, and improve your English too!

18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing It’s a familiar scene: you’re slumped over your keyboard or notebook, obsessing over your character. While we tend to agonize over everything from structure to backstory, it’s important to weigh how you write something too. A perfectly constructed world is flat on the page if you use feeble, common words. When you’re finished constructing your perfectly balanced world, do your writing a favor and take another pass to weed out these 18 haggard words. Good The 50 most useful Idioms and their Meaning Commonly used Idioms Idiom: a manner of speaking that is natural to native speakers of a language Every language has its own collection of wise sayings. They offer advice about how to live and also transfer some underlying ideas, principles and values of a given culture / society. These sayings are called "idioms" - or proverbs if they are longer.

Games/vocabulary Pages This Blog Linked From Here Useful links 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen. ~Florence KingSo avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy.

There's a Word for That: 25 Expressions You Should Have in Your Vocabulary Recently I came across this amazing little Tumblr named ‘OtherWordly‘ – itself a play on words. It consists of a collection of strange and lovely words from different languages through different times. What I like most about this selection of consonants and vowels – little meaning-carrying packages of vibration – is that they all try to point to the unspeakable, the transient or the neglected.

600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary - Your students are bright, but they don’t always sound like it. Their diction is full of cliche and emaciated language that doesn’t reflect their inner voice, nor does it indicate their vocabulary level. You want your students to use specific language that demonstrates intended meaning rather than the first word that popped into their head, but you want to do more than hand them a thesaurus and tell them to “figure it out.” While the following graphics aren’t going to make that happen, they can certainly play a role if posted to your classroom blog, shared on a student-teacher pinterest page, hung on a classroom wall, or reformatted, printed, hole-punched, and stored in a student binder.

Idioms Idioms and idiomatic expressions in English An idiom is a group of words in current usage having a meaning that is not deducible from those of the individual words. For example, "to rain cats and dogs" - which means "to rain very heavily" - is an idiom; and "over the moon" - which means "extremely happy" - is another idiom. proverbs TRADITIONAL PROVERBS: A barking dog never bites. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush A fool and his money are soon parted. A friend in need is a friend indeed. A new broom sweeps clean. Green Smoothie Cups Featured Ingredient: Avocado The most popular post I have had on this blog is for these Green Smoothie Cups. Apparently the health-conscious, smoothie-loving masses out there love the idea of having green smoothies ready to whirl with no assembly required. So I thought I would pass along another great green monster smoothie cup recipe to enjoy this summer.

Persuasive Writing - Emotional vs Intellectual Words I have written about persuasive writing in an article where I discuss Ethos, Logos, Pathos. Persuasive writers use words to convince the reader to listen or to act. I found this useful list of words in an interesting article called Common words that suck emotional power out of your content by John Gregory Olson.

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