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Human body. "Physiologies" redirects here.

Human body

For other uses, see Physiology. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2013) Shoulder. Structures Bones Bone is living tissue that makes up the body's skeleton providing shape and support.

shoulder

The bones that form the shoulder are the clavicle, humerus, and scapula, the latter providing the glenoid cavity, acromion and coracoid processes. These three bones create a ball-and-socket glenohumeral joint, that gives the shoulder its wide range of motion in three different planes. Wrist. This article may be too technical for most readers to understand.

wrist.

Please help improve this article to make it understandable to non-experts, without removing the technical details. The talk page may contain suggestions. (June 2015) As a consequence of these various definitions, fractures to the carpal bones are referred to as carpal fractures, while fractures such as distal radius fracture are often considered fractures to the wrist. [5] Structure Posterior and anterior aspects of right human wrist Ligaments of wrist. Leg. Structure In human anatomical terms, the leg is the part of the lower extremity that lies between the knee and the ankle, the thigh is between the hip and knee and the term "lower extremity" is used to describe the colloquial leg.

leg

This article generally follows the common usage. Comparison between human and gorilla skeletons. (Gorilla in non-natural stretched posture.) Heel. The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot.

heel

Toes. Structure The toe refers to a part of the human foot, with five toes present on each human foot.

Toes

Each toe consists of three phalanx bones, the proximal, middle, and distal, with the exception of the big toe (Latin: Hallux). Ankle. The ankle, or the talocrural region,[1] is the region where the foot and the leg meet.[2] The ankle includes three joints: the ankle joint proper or talocrural joint, the subtalar joint, and the Inferior tibiofibular joint.[3][4][5] The movements produced at this joint are dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the foot.

ankle

In common usage, the term ankle refers exclusively to the ankle region. In medical terminology, "ankle" (without qualifiers) can refer broadly to the region or specifically to the talocrural joint.[1][6] Thigh. This article needs additional citations for verification.

thigh

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2011) In humans, the thigh is the area between the pelvis and the knee. List of human anatomical features. This article may be too technical for most readers to understand.

List of human anatomical features

Please help improve this article to make it understandable to non-experts, without removing the technical details. The talk page may contain suggestions. (February 2014) List of anatomical variations. Calf (leg) The calf (TA: sura) is the back portion of the lower leg in human anatomy.

Calf (leg)

The muscles within the calf correspond to the posterior compartment of the leg. The two largest muscles within this compartment are known together as the calf muscle and attach to the heel via the Achilles tendon. Several other, smaller muscles attach to the knee, the ankle, and via long tendons to the toes. This section requires expansion. (February 2014) Forearm. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2007) Knee. It is often grouped into tibiofemoral and patellofemoral components.[3][4] (The fibular collateral ligament is often considered with tibiofemoral components.)[5] Structure Articular surfaces of femur.

Articular surfaces of tibia. Pain. Pain is a distressing feeling often caused by intense or damaging stimuli, such as stubbing a toe, burning a finger, putting alcohol on a cut, and bumping the "funny bone".[1] Because it is a complex, subjective phenomenon, defining pain has been a challenge. The International Association for the Study of Pain's widely used definition states: "Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.

"[2] In medical diagnosis, pain is a symptom. Morbid Anatomy. Back pain. The pain may originate from the muscles, nerves, bones, joints or other structures in the vertebral column (spine). Internal structures such as the gallbladder and pancreas may also cause referred pain in the back. Back pain is common with about nine out of ten adults experiencing it at some point in their life, and five out of ten working adults having it every year.[2] However, it is rare for it to be permanently disabling, and in most cases of herniated disks and stenosis, rest, injections or surgery have similar general pain resolution outcomes on average after one year. In the United States, acute low back pain is the fifth most common reason for physician visits and causes 40% of missed days off work.[3] Additionally, it is the single leading cause of disability worldwide.[4] Classification The character of back pain indicates its likely tissue of origin.

Thoracic wall. The thoracic wall or chest wall is the boundary of the thoracic cavity. Structure The bony skeletal part of the wall is the rib cage, and the rest is made up of muscle, skin and fascia. The chest wall has 10 layers namely skin, superficial fascia, deep fascia, serratus anterior, layer for ribs(containing intercostal muscles), endothoracic fascia from superficial to deep. Abdominal wall. Wikiwand. Abdomen. Structure Contents. Navel. The body. Body fat percentage. Typical body fat amounts Epidemiologically, the percentage of body fat in an individual varies according to sex and age.[2] Various theoretical approaches exist on the relationships between body fat percentage, health, athletic capacity, etc. Different authorities have consequently developed different recommendations for ideal body fat percentages.

Body volume index. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia's general notability guideline. Waist-to-height ratio. A person's waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), also called waist-to-stature ratio (WSR), is defined as their waist circumference divided by their height, both measured in the same units. Human reproductive system. The human reproductive system usually involves internal fertilization by sexual intercourse. During this process, the male inserts his erect penis into the female's vagina and ejaculates semen, which contains sperm. Female reproductive system. Male reproductive system. Reproductive system.

Waist–hip ratio. Neuroscience. Embarrassing Bodies from Channel 4, including Health Guides. About my brain. Human Body 2. Our Bodies. The Human Body & Anatomy. Buttocks. 6 Things Your Body Does Every Day That Science Can't Explain - Sharenator. Cymatics in the human body.

Body + Body Systems. Human Body. The Body. Anatomy. THe Human Body Grade 5. The Human Body & Anatomy. 7 Big Myths About Body Fat. 10 Stubborn Body Myths That Just Won't Die, Debunked by Science. HowStuffWorks "Top 10 Brain Myths" Mind & Body. Body + Human Body. Head and neck anatomy. Body proportions. Life Lists. Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body. Neutral spine. Sole (foot) All Stomach Muscles Anatomy And Abdominal Muscles Exercises. Historical Anatomies on the Web. Your Guide to the Human Body and Human Body Systems. Stomach. 3D Human Anatomy. Human leg. Human body. Google's Body Browser is a Google Earth for Human Physiology.

Human physical appearance. Eye color. Human eye.

Body2

Dream Anatomy: A National Library of Medicine Exhibit.