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4 Ways to Support Queer Femmes – Instead of Erasing Us from Queer Communities. Panel 1 (Em, our main character, talking to the audience) Em: I’m a queer femme and I love it.

4 Ways to Support Queer Femmes – Instead of Erasing Us from Queer Communities

Femme is an integral part of my identity! However, sometimes my queer community lets me down. Panel 2 (A butch-identifying person speaking over Em) Em: Sometimes— Butch: Well as a queer butch, I feel that— Em: Excuse me, I was talking! Butch: Oh…you were? Panel 3 (Em sighing) Em: The culture we live in celebrates masculinity and demonizes and shames femininity, and that doesn’t go away in the queer community.

Panel 4 Em: Here are four suggestions of ways to be an ally to queer femmes. Panel 5 (A person scanning over a group of people, ignoring the person who has their hand raised) Text: Don’t assume we’re straight because of our gender expression. Person: Is there anyone here who can speak on the queer experience? Panel 6 (Two people talking, one with longer hair) Text: Invalidate us… Person with Short Hair: You’d get more dates if you cut your hair. Panel 7. Coming Out as Genderqueer Non-Binary (Outside Of and Within the Queer Community) I was on my way home when I passed a person I frequently see outside of my favorite coffee shop.

Coming Out as Genderqueer Non-Binary (Outside Of and Within the Queer Community)

The person stopped me, and with a confused look on their face, they asked, “Yo, so I see you around here all the time. But—like—are you a boy or a girl?” I paused for a moment, thought about it, and responded, “Both!” Gender. Gender is a messy, complex, and ever-shifting experience for me. There is no simple way to explain my gender to other people – or even to myself. We live in a society preoccupied with categorizations and label one another (and ourselves) by race, gender, sexuality, education, class position, caste, and so on. Often times, there is little to no acknowledgement of the gray area between categories and binaries – even though that’s where so many of us reside. Seed & Spark: In-Betweeners: The Absence of Gender Fluidity in Media.

This is a guest post by E.A.

Seed & Spark: In-Betweeners: The Absence of Gender Fluidity in Media

Francis. I am an other, an in-between. I use the term “gender fluid” and I don’t consider myself a woman or a man. I am still perceived by the world as a woman, though, and was raised as such. Sometimes people study me in public, trying to figure out what I am. In some ways, we have come a long way. Characters play a key role in our individual process of self-discovery. Just like an author who writes the book they wish to read, our first instinct with storytelling is to speak the truths and questions that are within us as individuals in the hope that others share the same thoughts.

Read a F*cking Book: Late Summer Reading For Queers and Feminists. In a recent essay on her bibliomania, Zadie Smith writes that summer is the most forgiving time of year for compulsive reading, as “the beach is one of the few places pathological readers can pass undetected among their civilian cousins.”

Read a F*cking Book: Late Summer Reading For Queers and Feminists

Regardless of the degree of your pathology, these brand-new and forthcoming books look both super exciting and also relevant to your interests. With essays, a cookbook, historical fiction, lesbian romance, memoir, gender studies and more in no particular order*, your to-read list is about to get even longer. Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay In her first collection of essays, writer, academic and badass Roxane Gay addresses pop culture, politics, race, class, gender and more. I honestly could not be more excited for this book. “Gay’s subtext is that to be female in this age and not be a feminist is to be a victim of internalized misogyny. The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters Smoke Gets In Your Eyes by Caitlin Doughty There Goes The Gayborhood? Bibliographie sélective (et en travail) de textes queers en français. Imprimer/PDF Cette bibliographie a été compilée en 2013 pour la mise sur pied à Montréal d’un cercle de lecture de textes sur la théorie queer.

Bibliographie sélective (et en travail) de textes queers en français

Elle comprend des livres (en traduction ou en version originale française), des articles et des revues portant sur le sujet, en plus de laisser une place aux zines et aux critiques du queer. Tous en français. Cette recension est bien sûr incomplète, d’autant que de plus en plus de textes sont écrits sur le sujet et que de nouvelles traductions sortent chaque année. On vous invite à nous transmettre vos titres afin que nous puissions les ajouter au fur et à mesure et ainsi aider d’autres lecteur.trices dans leurs recherches.

Compilée par Bruno Laprade Livres : BERSANI, Léo. 1998. BERSANI, Léo. 2011. BOURCIER, Marie-Hélène, 1998. BOURCIER, Marie-Hélène.2001.