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Pictures by Lear - Edward Lear and Crete. Edward Lear and Crete - Home. Revisiting Greece Through Painting / News / The American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Brian Nolan has not been to Greece in years, but he often paints scenes of Meteora and Crete.

Revisiting Greece Through Painting / News / The American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Today Nolan works as a systems engineering consultant based in Virginia, but he started off as a classicist--getting an undergraduate degree from Holy Cross and a PhD from Ohio State. He attended the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for the summer session in 1976, and returned for the regular member year as an ITT International Fellow (an educational student exchange program in the 70s and 80s) in the 1979-1980 school year. Brian Nolan at Meteora in 1979 Over his summer session Nolan often toted around his brother’s Olympus camera, taking pictures of the sites. When he returned in 1979 Nolan upgraded to his own Olympus Om1, photographing his hiking trips and travels around the country-side. Temple of Apollo, Corinth, 1976 After receiving his PhD in 1981, Nolan had difficulty finding a classics position, and instead worked at the Red Cross for several years.

Hosios Loukas, 1976. LEAR, Edward - Crete - TRAVELLERS' VIEWS - Places – Monuments – People Southeastern Europe – Eastern Mediterranean – Greece – Asia Minor – Southern Italy, 15th -20th century. Edward Lear (1812-1888) was a prolific landscape painter as well as as a prominent satirical writer.

LEAR, Edward - Crete - TRAVELLERS' VIEWS - Places – Monuments – People Southeastern Europe – Eastern Mediterranean – Greece – Asia Minor – Southern Italy, 15th -20th century

Lear was the last of twenty one children. Due to financial trouble in the family, he was raised and educated by his sisters. He started painting for a living from from adolescence. Because of the precarious state of his health, he was obliged to travel to warmer climates. Thus, he toured Italy, Greece, Albania, Palestine, Syria, Egypt and many other places, even India when he had reached his sixties. From 1837, Lear lived in Italy. In the introduction to this edition, which is a reproduction of his work on the Ionian islands, Lear stresses that this land is ideal, endowed with generous beauty, a variety of shapes and colours, while at every station of his journey the traveller enjoys the warm hospitality of the locals.

Written by Ioli Vingopoulou. Ashmolean Museum; Sir Arthur Evans: Home. Evans, Knossos and the Minoans – Facts and Forgeries – Crete. When you look at the advertisments for Crete, usually provided by the Greek tourist board, a huge amount of publicity is given to the ‘great Minoan civilisation’ discovered by Arthur Evans at the turn of the 20th century.

Evans, Knossos and the Minoans – Facts and Forgeries – Crete

Coach tours are offered to Knossos, the disneyland of archeology, where Evans poured concrete to recreate his ideas of what this fine civilisation meant. He has written about a ‘pax Minoica’ a society that lived in peace under a matriarchal dynasty based on the legend of King Minos. A society of art and bull jumping and palaces with plumbing. It all sounds rather dreamlike. Perhaps it was. After all, Evans invented the Minoans. One of the most stunning of Evans dicoveries, were the frescoes he found at Knossos. Here is a reproduction of a book review by Mary Beard. “The masterpieces of Minoan art are not what they seem. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2002.05.16. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2002.05.16 J.A.

Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2002.05.16

MacGillivray, Knossos: Pottery Groups of the Old Palace Period. BSA Studies 5. Athens and London: The British School at Athens, 1998. Pp. 352; figs. 146, pls. 156. Reviewed by Patrick M. This book is an exercise in the "archaeology of archaeology": a reconsideration and re-publication of material from the site of Knossos, excavated between 1901 and 1930 by Arthur Evans and his associates. The book is divided into three chapters, followed by the pottery catalog, various concordances, and the plates. The second chapter discusses the range of pottery fabrics found, classifies the decoration, and provides a typology of the most common shapes, ending with a short treatment of chronological changes.

It seems to me that M. misses the dual nature of Furumark's typology, which takes into account not only the actual shape of the vessel, but also its likely or presumed function. More could have been done with the classification of motifs. Errata: