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NILS FERBER. 4 amazing tricks with batteries.□... - Smart is the New Sexy. Free K - 12 Common Core Lesson Plans and Ideas. Free K - 12 Common Core Lesson Plans and Ideas. 09 Magnetism -                                   Heck's Physics. Measuring the Strength of a Magnet. Bigger magnets aren’t always “stronger”.

Measuring the Strength of a Magnet

But how do you make a comparison between different magnets? One way is to determine the magnetic dipole moment of the magnet. Magnetic Dipole Moment Maybe you aren’t quite sure about dipoles, but let me go ahead and say that a bar magnet isn’t actually a dipole. Ok, now for an actual dipole. Notice that I have correctly drawn this dipole by putting the positive charge as a red object and the negative as blue.

Now suppose you look at a bar magnet. But how do you quantify this in some way? For two electric charges, the magnitude of the field along the axis can be found as: Chapter 4: The Periodic Table & Bonding. Show a picture of a pencil point and how the carbon atoms look at the molecular level.

Chapter 4: The Periodic Table & Bonding

Project the image Pencil Zoom. Students should be familiar with the parts of the atom from Chapter 3 but reviewing the main points is probably a good idea. Ask students questions such as the following: What are the three different tiny particles that make up an atom? Protons, neutrons, and electrons. Which of these is in the center of the atom? Show the simulation Balloons and Static Electricity from the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Physics Education Technology site. Electromagnetism Experiments. Electric current flowing through a wire creates a magnetic field that attracts ferromagnetic objects, such as iron or steel.

Electromagnetism Experiments

This is the principle behind electromagnets and magnetic levitation trains. It allows cranes to pick up whole cars in the junkyard and makes your doorbell ring. You can read about it here, and then watch it work when you do these experiments. (Adult supervision recommended.) Experiment 1: Electromagnetic Suction A single strand of wire produces only a very weak magnetic field, but a tight coil of wire (called a solenoid) gives off a stronger field. What You Need: What You Do: Electricity. The Good, the Bad and the Electromagnet. Summary Using plastic straws, wire, batteries and iron nails, student teams build and test two versions of electromagnets—one with and one without an iron nail at its core.

The Good, the Bad and the Electromagnet

They test each magnet's ability pick up loose staples, which reveals the importance of an iron core to the magnet's strength. Students also learn about the prevalence and importance of electromagnets in their everyday lives. Engineering Connection Great minds such as Maxwell, Faraday and Gauss made discoveries that continue to shape our modern world. Educational Standards Each TeachEngineering lesson or activity is correlated to one or more K-12 science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) educational standards. All 100,000+ K-12 STEM standards covered in TeachEngineering are collected, maintained and packaged by the Achievement Standard Network (ASN), a project of JES & Co. Click on the standard groupings to explore this hierarchy as it applies to this document. Learning Objectives Describe what an electromagnet is. Static Cling. Summary This hands-on activity explores the concept of static electricity.

Static Cling

Students attract an O-shaped piece of cereal to a charged comb and watch the cereal jump away when it touches the comb. Students also observe Styrofoam pellets pulling towards a charged comb, then leaping back to the table. Engineering Connection Engineers consider static electricity when designing, manufacturing and packaging electronic circuit boards. Educational Standards Each TeachEngineering lesson or activity is correlated to one or more K-12 science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) educational standards. All 100,000+ K-12 STEM standards covered in TeachEngineering are collected, maintained and packaged by the Achievement Standard Network (ASN), a project of JES & Co.

In the ASN, standards are hierarchically structured: first by source; e.g., by state; within source by type; e.g., science or mathematics; within type by subtype, then by grade, etc. Learning Objectives Materials List. Whose Field Line Is It, Anyway? Summary Students teams each use a bar magnet, sheet of paper and iron shavings to reveal the field lines as they travel around a magnet.

Whose Field Line Is It, Anyway?

They repeat the activity with an electromagnet made by wrapping thin wire around a nail and connecting either wire end to a battery. The Electric and Magnetic Personalities of Mr. Maxwell. Summary Students are briefly introduced to Maxwell's equations and their significance to phenomena associated with electricity and magnetism.

The Electric and Magnetic Personalities of Mr. Maxwell

Basic concepts such as current, electricity and field lines are covered and reinforced. Circles of Magnetism IV. Curie Point. Circles of Magnetism I. Motor Effect. Piezoelectric One-Way Remote. Jitterbug. Simple Portable Conductivity Meter. Shake Table. Stretch the Chain and See the Light. Kosher Dill Current: Make Your Own Battery! Glowing Pickle. Short Circuit. Polar Opposites. Electroscope. Magnetic Suction. Stripped-down Motor. Simple Spinner. Cake by Conduction. Magnetic Pendulums. Penny Battery. Hand Battery. Electrostatic Water Attraction. Eddy Currents. Holding Charge. Make a Speaker: A Coil, a Magnet, and Thou.