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Fixed vs Growth Mindset

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Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions. By Eduardo Briceño A growth mindset is the understanding that personal qualities and abilities can change.

Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions

It leads people to take on challenges, persevere in the face of setbacks, and become more effective learners. As more and more people learn about the growth mindset, which was first discovered by Stanford Professor Carol Dweck, we sometimes observe some confusions about it. Recently some critiques have emerged. Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset. All educators care deeply about their students' motivation.

Recognizing and Overcoming False Growth Mindset

They want them to love learning, and to be resourceful and persistent in the face of learning challenges. They don't want their students to lose heart when they get stuck, make mistakes, or receive disappointing grades. Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck - Rules for Engagement. Washington Stanford researcher Carol Dweck clearly tapped into a powerful and compelling idea when she linked the concept of growth mindsets to academic success.

Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck - Rules for Engagement

As fans of Dweck's research can quickly explain, people with fixed mindsets see strengths and skills as inate traits, like eye color. You're either born with them, or you're not. But people with growth mindsets recognize that the brain can grow and change through effort, and they embrace failures as opportunities for developing new strategies and approaches to learning content and concepts they find challenging. Enthusiasm for Dweck's work has spread rapidly, and her name is a buzzword in many schools as teachers buy into the idea that helping students shift their mindsets can lead to academic gains.

But, in recent years, Dweck has worked to balance that enthusiasm by busting some misconceptions about her research and its applications in schools. Here are six tips pulled from Dweck's talk: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Growth Mindset vs Fixed Mindset: An Introduction. Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students. Teachers have long battled with how to get their students to become more resilient and improve their mindset.

Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students

One popular theory, pioneered by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, is the idea of growth mindset. Dweck explains that some students believe ability is malleable and can be improved (a growth mindset), while others think it is set in stone, probably decided at birth (a fixed mindset). Evidence suggests that those with a growth mindset seek out feedback on how to get better, persist with work for longer and cope better with change – all attitudes teachers want to develop in their young charges.

How can teachers encourage a growth mindset? When working with young people, choosing which behaviours to praise can have a profound impact. As well as thinking of the feedback you offer your class, there are certain questions you can ask to get them thinking about their own mindset: Is the effort today worth the reward tomorrow? This can be a simple weekend project. Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions. This Graphic Explains 20 Cognitive Biases That Affect Your Decision-Making. How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies.

In his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.”

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies

That’s a disconcerting message, and hard to believe at first. But it’s also unexpectedly liberating, because Carey further explains that many things we think of as detractors from learning — like forgetting, distractions, interruptions or sleeping rather than hitting the books — aren’t necessarily bad after all. They can actually work in your favor, according to a body of research that offers surprising insights and simple, doable strategies for learning more effectively. Society has ingrained in us “a monkish conception of what learning is, of you sitting with your books in your cell,” Carey told MindShift. “How We Learn” presents a new view that takes some of the pressure off.

Getting to Know Your Brain’s Memory Processes. The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D. Why the Growth Mindset?

The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D.

When students and educators have a growth mindset, they understand that intelligence can be developed. Students focus on improvement instead of worrying about how smart they are. They work hard to learn more and get smarter. Based on years of research by Stanford University’s Dr. Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff. An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning.

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff

Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff. According to Dweck: Needless to say, this idea of mindsets has significant implications for education.

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