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Do Students Lose Depth in Digital Reading? Do students learn as much when they read digitally as they do in print?

Do Students Lose Depth in Digital Reading?

For both parents and teachers, knowing whether computer-based media are improving or compromising education is a question of concern. With the surge in popularity of e-books, online learning and open educational resources, investigators have been trying to determine whether students do as well when reading an assigned text on a digital screen as on paper.

The answer to the question, however, needs far more than a yes-no response. Theconversation. Do students learn as much when they read digitally as they do in print?

theconversation

For both parents and teachers, knowing whether computer-based media are improving or compromising education is a question of concern. With the surge in popularity of e-books, online learning and open educational resources, investigators have been trying to determine whether students do as well when reading an assigned text on a digital screen as on paper. The answer to the question, however, needs far more than a yes-no response. Reading in print versus digitally. Why Digital Reading Is No Substitute for Print. The students in my study reported that print was aesthetically more enjoyable, saying things such as “I like the smell of paper” or that reading in print is “real reading.”

Why Digital Reading Is No Substitute for Print

What’s more, print gave them a sense of where they were in the book – they could “see” and “feel” where they were in the text. Print was also judged to be easier on the eyes and less likely to encourage multitasking. Almost half the participants complained about eyestrain from reading digitally (“my eyes burn”), and 67 percent indicated they were likely to multitask while reading digitally (compared with 41 percent when reading print). At the same time, respondents praised digital reading on a number of counts, including the ability to read in the dark, ease of finding material (“plenty of quick information”), saving paper and even the fact they could multitask while reading. New Research Explains How The Pen Is Mightier Than The Keyboard. LIT_Blog_DTOP_BelowTitle_336x280 posted By The Literacy Site The Literacy Site In her graduate assistant days, psychological scientist Pam Mueller of Princeton University used to take notes just like everyone else in the modern age: with a computer.

New Research Explains How The Pen Is Mightier Than The Keyboard

Ncolonie / NCCS Resources. The Benefits of No-Tech Note Taking. The moment of truth for me came in the spring 2013 semester.

The Benefits of No-Tech Note Taking

I looked out at my visual-communication class and saw a group of six students transfixed by the blue glow of a video on one of their computers, and decided I was done allowing laptops in my large lecture class. "Done" might be putting it mildly. Although I am an engaging lecturer, I could not compete with Facebook and YouTube, and I was tired of trying. Your paper brain and your Kindle brain aren't the same thing.

Would you like paper or plasma?

Your paper brain and your Kindle brain aren't the same thing

That's the question book lovers face now that e-reading has gone mainstream. And, as it turns out, our brains process digital reading very differently. Manoush Zomorodi, managing editor and host of WNYC's New Tech City, recalls a conversation with the Washington Post's Mike Rosenwald, who's researched the effects of reading on a screen.

“He found, like I did, that when he sat down to read a book his brain was jumping around on the page. He was skimming and he couldn’t just settle down. Neuroscience, in fact, has revealed that humans use different parts of the brain when reading from a piece of paper or from a screen. “They call it a ‘bi-literate’ brain,” Zoromodi says. So what's deep reading? Linear reading and digital distractions have caught the attention of academics like Maryanne Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University. Using computers widens the achievement gap in writing, a federal study finds. Can elementary-school children show off their best writing on a computer?

Using computers widens the achievement gap in writing, a federal study finds

The research arm of the U.S. Department of Education was curious to learn just that. In 2012 it handed out laptop computers to more than 10,000 fourth-graders and asked them to complete two 30-minute writing assignments. Initial results from the study were positive: most of the young students were able complete the writing assignments and use the editing tools. Soon after, states began rolling out new Common Core-aligned tests that included online writing components. But a new, deeper analysis of the 2012 writing pilot, released to the public in December 2015, found more complicated results. “(T)he use of the computer may have widened the writing achievement gap,” concluded the working paper, “Performance of fourth-grade students in the 2012 NAEP computer-based writing pilot assessment.”

How Memory, Focus and Good Teaching Can Work Together to Help Kids Learn. Everyone has a pet theory on how to improve public education: better professional development for teachers, more money, better curriculum, testing for accountability, teacher incentives, technology, streamlined bureaucracy.

How Memory, Focus and Good Teaching Can Work Together to Help Kids Learn

Policymakers have been trying these solutions for years with mixed results. But those who study the brain have their own ideas for improving how kids learn: focus on teaching kids how to learn. Taking Notes: Is The Pen Still Mightier Than the Keyboard? Educators are eager to know how the computers popping up in their classrooms actually affect student learning.

Taking Notes: Is The Pen Still Mightier Than the Keyboard?

Much of the research has focused on how computers and other digital devices increase the temptation and likelihood of multitasking, leading to lower comprehension and reduced productivity. But until now, few people have looked into whether the method of note-taking a student uses, such as typing on a computer or writing in longhand, affects how well he or she comprehends the lecture. A recent study published in Psychological Science confronts the issue head-on. Researchers Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer asked students to take notes on a 20-minute video lecture using either longhand or a computer that had been disabled for any other use. They wanted to remove the distractions that have given note-taking on computers lower marks for memory and comprehension.

The two researchers set up three studies to test various conditions. The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens. In a viral YouTube video from October 2011 a one-year-old girl sweeps her fingers across an iPad's touchscreen, shuffling groups of icons.

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens

In the following scenes she appears to pinch, swipe and prod the pages of paper magazines as though they too were screens. When nothing happens, she pushes against her leg, confirming that her finger works just fine—or so a title card would have us believe. The girl's father, Jean-Louis Constanza, presents "A Magazine Is an iPad That Does Not Work" as naturalistic observation—a Jane Goodall among the chimps moment—that reveals a generational transition. "Technology codes our minds," he writes in the video's description. "Magazines are now useless and impossible to understand, for digital natives"—that is, for people who have been interacting with digital technologies from a very early age.

Five days at outdoor education camp without screens improves preteen skills with nonverbal emotion cues. Open Access Highlights Preteens spent five days in a nature camp without access to screens and were compared to controls. Both groups took pre- and post-tests regarding nonverbal emotional cues. The experimental group’s recognition of cues improved significantly over the control. Time away from screen media, with increased social interaction, may improve comprehension of nonverbal emotional cues. Abstract A field experiment examined whether increasing opportunities for face-to-face interaction while eliminating the use of screen-based media and communication tools improved nonverbal emotion–cue recognition in preteens. The Case Against Laptops in the Classroom. Last week, at the Aspen Ideas festival, there came an interesting little moment between Kentaro Toyama, a computer scientist, and Jim Steyer, a lawyer and entrepreneur.

Readers win when libraries add e-books, but preserve print, as well. Linda Schlekau at the Woodrow Wilson library in Fairfax County in 2006. (Carol Guzy/The Washington Post) By Editorial Board July 10. Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension. News Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks — research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Walk into any university lecture hall and you’re likely to see row upon row of students sitting behind glowing laptop screens. School Librarians Push for More 'Maker Spaces' Does Google Help Students Learn (or Just Think They Do?) - Inside School Research. In A Digital Chapter, Paper Notebooks Are As Relevant As Ever.