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Don't Expect Toddlers To Behave Consistently — They Literally Can't. Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? | MindShift | KQED News. Over the past 50-60 years, play time in kids’ lives has been drastically cut. School days and years are longer and parents often schedule enrichment activities for their children instead of giving them space to direct their own play. Children are rarely given the freedom to direct their own activities, leading to a persistent rise in children feeling that they have no control over their lives. And, while correlation doesn’t prove causation, Dr.

Peter Gray, who has been studying play for years, says there’s strong evidence that in this case, the decline in play is leading to a rise in depression and acute anxiety among young people. Check out his TEDx talk for all the details on this fascinating area of research. Read more about play here. Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? Katrina Schwartz Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco. Which Early Childhood Experiences Shape Adult Life? | MindShift | KQED News. By Maanvi Singh, NPR Most of us don’t remember our first two or three years of life — but our earliest experiences may stick with us for years and continue to influence us well into adulthood. Just how they influence us and how much is a question that researchers are still trying to answer.

Two studies look at how parents’ behavior in those first years affects life decades later, and how differences in children’s temperament play a role. The first study, published Thursday in Child Development, found that the type of emotional support that a child receives during their her first three and a half years has an effect on education, social life and romantic relationships even 20 or 30 years later. Babies and toddlers raised in supportive and caring home environments tended to do better on standardized tests later on, and they were more likely to attain higher degrees as adults.

Raby used data collected from 243 people who participated in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk. Why Empathy Holds the Key to Transforming 21st Century Learning | MindShift | KQED News. By Thom Markham Like other aspects of modern life, education can make the head hurt. So many outcomes, so much important work to do, so many solutions and strategies, so many variations on teaching, so many different kinds of students with so many different needs, so many unknowns in preparing for 21st Century life and the endless list of jobs that haven’t been invented.

What if we discovered one unifying factor that brought all of this confusion under one roof and gave us a coherent sense of how to stimulate the intellect, teach children to engage in collaborative problem solving and creative challenge, and foster social-emotional balance and stability—one factor that, if we got right, would change the equation for learning in the same way that confirming the existence of a fundamental particle informs a grand theory of the universe? That factor exists: It’s called empathy. To make that argument requires a deep dive into the profound nature of empathy. The takeaway? Key Person & Attachment. The Key Person Children thrive from a base of loving and secure relationships.

This is normally provided by a child’s parents but it can also be provided by a key person. A key person is a named member of staff with responsibilities for a small group of children who helps those children in the group feel safe and cared for. The role is an important one and an approach set out in the EYFS which is working successfully in settings and in Reception classes. It involves the key person in responding sensitively to children’s feelings and behaviours and meeting emotional needs by giving reassurance, such as when they are new to a setting or class, and supporting the child’s well-being.

The key person supports physical needs too, helping with issues like nappy changing, toileting and dressing. That person is a familiar figure who is accessible and available as a point of contact for parents and one who builds relationships with the child and parents or carers. Why Attachment Matters. How Are Happiness and Learning Connected? As teachers, we also know that when students' affective filters or defenses are sky high, fight or flight responses will be modus operandi. A room full of defensive behaviors (withdrawn, angry) is a sad, unproductive place to teach and learn. Now let's flip it and take a look at how much more we are able to learn when we are in harmony with the people and things in any given educational environment.

Being in harmony means feeling safe, feeling valued and a necessary part a group, and in this case, a learning community. Hearts and Minds in Sync What does research show to be the opposite of the brain's fight or flight response? Co-founder of the NeuroLeadership Institute Dr. "Engagement is a state of being willing to do difficult things, to take risks, to think deeply about issues and develop new solutions. ...Interest, happiness, joy, and desire are approach emotions. Let's go back to Dr. In the Classroom Of course this is great news from the research of Dr. Now we'd love to hear from you! What to consider when teaching English in large classes. How many students do you teach? Do you feel that your classes are too big? Author and education consultant Jason Anderson looks at the issues and offers some potential solutions.

For many of us, our classes are larger than we would like them to be. They can present a number of challenges that teachers of smaller classes are less likely to face. But what exactly do we mean by large classes? What challenges do they bring, and how can we develop our own solutions for teaching English in large classes (TELC)? Definitions of a large class What we label a ‘large class’ depends mostly on context and expectations. In this article, we will take the midpoint between these two figures. Where teachers work in large classes today Perhaps the two continents where teachers most commonly work in large classes are Africa (especially sub-Saharan Africa) and Asia (especially the Indian sub-continent and China). This is not a uniform picture. Large classes are not unique to low-income countries. 1. 2. 1. 2. Курси для вивчення 28-ми мов світу для початківців. Що як ми скажемо – ти можеш вчити не тільки англійську? Мандаринська, іспанська, арабська та інші мови стають все актуальнішими, тому не варто себе обмежувати.

У нашій добірці – онлайн-курси, ресурси та навчальні матеріали, що допоможуть почати вивчати будь-яку, навіть найекзотичнішу мову! 10 найпоширеніших мов 1. Мандаринська мова Одна з основних груп діалектів китайської мови. Basic Mandarin Chinese – Level 1 Курс edX, що дозволить зробити перші кроки в мандаринській мові. Mandarin Chinese 1: Chinese for Beginners Coursera також пропонує курс для новачків. Chinese Made Easy: An Exciting Start To Chinese Курс для новачків, після закінчення якого ти зможеш почати читати і писати китайською, зрозумієш базові принципи мови та навіть підтримаєш просту розмову. 2. Цією мовою розмовляє більше 427 мільйонів людей, і що приємно, вона вважається легкою для вивчення.

Learn Spanish: Basic Spanish for English Speakers На тебе чекають 16 тижнів, присвячені повсякденній іспанській мові. 3. 4. Madinah Arabic. Password protected padlet. The Woman Who Changed Her Brain: Barbara Arrowsmith-Young at TEDxToronto. How can I help my child to start talking? (Video) Health visitor Sara Patience describes how you can help develop your child's language skills by talking and playing with her. Show transcript Hide transcript How can I help my child to start talking? Sara: “You want this one? Between 12 months and two-and-a-half years, there is a lot of language development, and you will hear your child start to use more and more words. You can help them by sitting with them, playing with them, talking to them, but by two, you should be hearing two words together.

Why does my toddler love repetition? Paediatric speech and language therapist. It may test your patience when your toddler demands 'Row, row, row your boat' for the 10th time. But there's a good reason for her insistence. Toddlers love repetition because it helps them to learn, and because it's familiar and comforting. From around the age of two, you will notice your toddler repeating the same words and phrases constantly. Through repeating things, your toddler is able to take in new information each time. And she will love stories and nursery rhymes with repeated phrases, because she can join in. A small study has found that repetition of stories may help children to learn new words. After hearing her favourite book many times, your toddler may even remember it well enough to add the endings to some of the sentences. Repetition is also comforting for your toddler.

As your toddler learns more about the world around her, she may at times feel overwhelmed by all the new information she's taking in. Let's Talk. What do babies need in order to learn and thrive? One thing they need is conversation — responsive, back-and-forth communication with their parents and caregivers. This interactive engagement is like food for their developing brains, nurturing language acquisition, early literacy, school readiness, and social and emotional well-being. A dispiriting number of children don’t get that kind of brain-fueling communication, research suggests. In early childhood policy (and in the wider media), much attention has been paid to the so-called word gap — findings that show that low-income children hear 30 million fewer words, on average, and have less than half the vocabulary of upper-income peers by age three.

In a commentary published today in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, Rowe joins forces with Boston Medical Center pediatrician Barry Zuckerman to offer specific guidance to pediatricians and parents about just what kind of talk is most important, at what ages and stages in a child’s growth. Deb Roy: The birth of a word. Listen to Your Mother. Young children face a remarkable challenge in learning to use the language of their culture. Toddlers vary widely, however, in the rate at which they learn new words.1 A team of Harvard Graduate School of Education researchers set out to ask whether and how children's language environment can impact vocabulary development.

In their study of mother-child pairs from low-income families, they found that mothers who used many different words (not just many words) had toddlers with faster growth in vocabulary use. During the toddler and preschool years, most children learn to use hundreds of words, combining them into sentences and engaging in conversation with others. From previous research, we know that variation in vocabulary growth relates to child characteristics like gender, and also to parental factors. What did they find? Like children from more affluent homes, these children varied widely in how quickly their vocabulary use grew during the infant and toddler years. 4Snow, C.

Early Childhood Care and Education. Early childhood, defined as the period from birth to eight years old, is a time of remarkable growth with brain development at its peak. During this stage, children are highly influenced by the environment and the people that surround them. Early childhood care and education (ECCE) is more than preparation for primary school. It aims at the holistic development of a child’s social, emotional, cognitive and physical needs in order to build a solid and broad foundation for lifelong learning and wellbeing.

ECCE has the possibility to nurture caring, capable and responsible future citizens. In this way ECCE is one of the best investments a country can make to promote human resource development, gender equality and social cohesion, and to reduce the costs for later remedial programmes.