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Western University-led research debunks the IQ myth. Public release date: 19-Dec-2012 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Jeff 519-661-2111 x85165University of Western Ontario After conducting the largest online intelligence study on record, a Western University-led research team has concluded that the notion of measuring one's intelligence quotient or IQ by a singular, standardized test is highly misleading.

Western University-led research debunks the IQ myth

Western-led research debunks the IQ myth. 15 Styles of Distorted Thinking. This is (not) psychology. Psychology. How Our Delusions Keep Us Sane: The Psychology of Our Essential Self-Enhancement Bias. By Maria Popova How evolution made the average person believe she is better in every imaginable way than the average person.

How Our Delusions Keep Us Sane: The Psychology of Our Essential Self-Enhancement Bias

“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement; nothing can be done without hope,” Helen Keller wrote in her 1903 treatise on optimism. But a positive outlook, it turns out, isn’t merely an intellectual disposition we don — it’s a deep-seated component of our evolutionary wiring and the product of powerful, necessary delusions our mind is working around-the-clock to maintain. The Self Illusion: How Our Social Brain Constructs Who We Are. Why Fear Is Fun. Mere-exposure effect. The mere-exposure effect is a psychological phenomenon by which people tend to develop a preference for things merely because they are familiar with them.

Mere-exposure effect

In social psychology, this effect is sometimes called the familiarity principle. The effect has been demonstrated with many kinds of things, including words, Chinese characters, paintings, pictures of faces, geometric figures, and sounds.[1] In studies of interpersonal attraction, the more often a person is seen by someone, the more pleasing and likeable that person appears to be. Research[edit] The earliest known research on the effect was conducted by Gustav Fechner in 1876.[2] Edward B. Dunning–Kruger effect. The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability to be much higher than is accurate.

Dunning–Kruger effect

This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their ineptitude. Conversely, highly skilled individuals tend to underestimate their relative competence, erroneously assuming that tasks that are easy for them are also easy for others.[1] David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University have postulated that the effect is the result of internal illusion in the unskilled, and external misperception in the skilled: "The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others.

"[1] Proposal[edit] Dunning and Kruger proposed that, for a given skill, incompetent people will:[4] Supporting studies[edit] Studies on the Dunning–Kruger effect tend to focus on American test subjects. The Backfire Effect: The Psychology of Why We Have a Hard Time Changing Our Minds. By Maria Popova How the disconnect between information and insight explains our dangerous self-righteousness.

The Backfire Effect: The Psychology of Why We Have a Hard Time Changing Our Minds

“Allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind,” I wrote in reflecting on the 7 most important things I learned in 7 years of Brain Pickings. It’s a conundrum most of us grapple with — on the one hand, the awareness that personal growth means transcending our smaller selves as we reach for a more dimensional, intelligent, and enlightened understanding of the world, and on the other hand, the excruciating growing pains of evolving or completely abandoning our former, more inferior beliefs as we integrate new knowledge and insight into our comprehension of how life works. That discomfort, in fact, can be so intolerable that we often go to great lengths to disguise or deny our changing beliefs by paying less attention to information that contradicts our present convictions and more to that which confirms them. So where does this leave us? Donating = Loving.

Jungian Personality Types

Psych Central Personality Test. Personality Patterns. Criminal profiling: the reality behind the myth. For 16 years, "mad bomber" George Metesky eluded New York City police.

Criminal profiling: the reality behind the myth

Metesky planted more than 30 small bombs around the city between 1940 and 1956, hitting movie theaters, phone booths and other public areas. In 1956, the frustrated investigators asked psychiatrist James Brussel, New York State's assistant commissioner of mental hygiene, to study crime scene photos and notes from the bomber. Brussel came up with a detailed description of the suspect: He would be unmarried, foreign, self-educated, in his 50s, living in Connecticut, paranoid and with a vendetta against Con Edison--the first bomb had targeted the power company's 67th street headquarters.

While some of Brussel's predictions were simply common sense, others were based on psychological ideas. For instance, he said that because paranoia tends to peak around age 35, the bomber, 16 years after his first bomb, would now be in his 50s. How does profiling work? Informal criminal profiling has a long history. Offender profiling. History of Forensic Psychology. Q: What is the history of the Behavioral Science Unit?

History of Forensic Psychology

1974: The Behavioral Science Unit (BSU) is created to investigate serial rape and homicide cases. There were originally eleven agents and it was a part of the Training Division. How to Hypnotize Yourself Using the Best Me Technique.