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Jack Monroe has won £24,000 in a libel action against Katie Hopkins. Behind the Scenes of Mark Zuckerberg’s Manifesto – Backchannel. Serena Williams vows: 'I won't be silent' on police violence. Image copyright AP Serena Williams has voiced her fears about police violence, writing on Facebook: "I won't be silent.

Serena Williams vows: 'I won't be silent' on police violence

" The US tennis star posted that she found herself feeling wary of law enforcement during a recent journey with her teenage nephew. Williams said that when they drove by a patrol car she remembered a woman whose boyfriend was fatally shot by police. She is the latest athlete to speak out about friction between law enforcement and the black community in the US.

Image copyright Facebook In Tuesday's Facebook post, Williams, 35, wrote that she had asked her 18-year-old nephew to drive her somewhere so she could work during the journey. She said that when she saw a police car she "remembered that horrible video of the woman in the car when a cop shot her boyfriend". Williams was apparently referring to the 6 July fatal shooting of Philando Castile, whose girlfriend live-streamed the confrontation with police in St Paul, Minnesota. She added: "I Won't Be Silent". Is it too late to stop the trolls trampling over our entire political discourse? It was a pretty standard far-right account: anonymous (check); misappropriating St George (check); dripping with venom towards “Muslim-loving” lefties (check).

Is it too late to stop the trolls trampling over our entire political discourse?

But this one had a twist. They had found my address and had taken screen shots of where I lived from Google’s Street View function. “Here’s his bedroom,” they wrote, with an arrow pointing at the window; “here’s the door he comes out at the morning”, with an arrow pointing at the entrance to my block of flats. In the time it took Twitter to shut down the account, they had already tweeted many other far-right accounts with the details. Then there was a charming chap who willed me to “burn in everlasting hell you godless faggot”, was determined to “find out where you live” so as to “enlighten you on what I do to cocksucking Marxist faggots” and “break every bone in your body” (all because he felt I slighted faith schools).

This is not to conjure up the world’s smallest violin and invite pity, it is to illustrate a point. The Immortal Myths About Online Abuse. If your website (or app!)

The Immortal Myths About Online Abuse

Is full of assholes, it’s your fault. The bottom line, as I wrote half a decade ago, is that if your website is full of assholes, it’s your fault. Same goes for your apps. We are accountable for the communities we create, and if we want to take credit for the magical moments that happen when people connect with each other online, then we have to take responsibility for the negative experiences that we enable. Our communities are defined by the worst things that we permit to happen. Living in the Cult of Likability - Bret Easton Ellis. On a recent episode of the television series “South Park,” the character Cartman and other townspeople who are enthralled with Yelp, the app that lets customers rate and review restaurants, remind maître d’s and waiters that they will be posting reviews of their meals.

Living in the Cult of Likability - Bret Easton Ellis

These “Yelpers” threaten to give the eateries only one star out of five if they don’t please them and do exactly as they say. What Is Public? Public is not simply defined.

What Is Public?

Public is not just what can be viewed by others, but a fragile set of social conventions about what behaviors are acceptable and appropriate. Make Donald Drumpf! David Lynch on Where Ideas Come From and the Fragmentary Nature of Creativity. As soon as we ask what creativity is, we invariably ponder the essential question of where good ideas come from and how we can coax them into manifesting.

David Lynch on Where Ideas Come From and the Fragmentary Nature of Creativity

In 1926, Graham Wallace proposed a pioneering model for the four stages of the creative process, which was adapted into a five-step “technique for producing ideas” in 1939, and went on to influence present theories about the creative process. But despite what psychologists may delineate, the best answers come from the trenches and the front lines — from the artists, writers, inventors, and other creative troopers who summon and wrangle ideas for a living.

In this fantastic conversation at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, LIVE from the NYPL host and interviewer extraordinaire Paul Holdengräber poses this very question — where do ideas come from? — to legendary director David Lynch. An idea comes — and you see it, and you hear it, and you know it…We don’t do anything without an idea. Photograph courtesy of BAM. How I made the Manchester New Year's Eve photo go viral. Image copyright Joel Goodman It's already been billed as the image of 2016 in some quarters.

How I made the Manchester New Year's Eve photo go viral

It's been called art and hailed for its beautiful composition. Others have singled out how it depicts 21st century Britain. If you have not yet seen the image in question, it shows drunken revellers on a Manchester street and was taken by photographer Joel Goodman on New Year's Eve. Confronting the challenges1.