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Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

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Finishing the Dream. US 'will review' policy on UN DRIP - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) BREAKING: Farmworkers, Consumers Declare National Boycott of Wendy’s! Elena SteinCoalition of Immokalee Workerselena@allianceforfairfood.org | 239-986-0688 Farmworkers, Consumers Declare National Boycott of Wendy’s Coalition of Immokalee Workers’ Campaign for Fair Food Calls on World’s Third Largest Hamburger Chain to Join Award-Winning Fair Food Program New York, NY: On Thursday, March 3, hundreds of farmworkers, religious leaders, students, and consumers will gather near Columbus Circle to launch a national boycott of Wendy’s, the world’s third largest hamburger chain.

BREAKING: Farmworkers, Consumers Declare National Boycott of Wendy’s!

Following the boycott announcement, the protesters will march from Columbus Circle to the Park Avenue offices of Wendy’s Board Chair Nelson Peltz, Founding Partner and CEO of the activist hedge fund Trian Partners and a major shareholder in Wendy’s. Univision Launches Campaign To Register 3 Million New Latino Voters. “In the past, we were described as the sleeping giant, but the giant has awakened.

Univision Launches Campaign To Register 3 Million New Latino Voters

Now we have to show that power.” - Univision news anchor Jorge Ramos While the Republican candidates battle over who can take a harder line on immigration, Univision, the country's number one Spanish language network, has launched an all-out effort to register new Hispanic voters. Eleven million Latino voters went to the polls in the last presidential election. According to the New York Times, that's about half the number who were eligible. Now, Univision is determined to sign up three million of those could-be voters - that's equal to the number of how many new Latino voters have come of age since 2012. The Univision campaign will include: "The rule is no one can make it to the White House without the Hispanic vote,” said Jorge Ramos, the network’s superstar news host. The Univision voter drive will attempt to simplify the voting process, "with no basic knowledge assumed.

" Teaching Tolerance - Diversity, Equity and Justice. 1900s 1903 In Oxnard, Calif., more than 1,200 Mexican and Japanese farm workers organize the first farm worker union, the Japanese-Mexican Labor Association (JMLA).

Teaching Tolerance - Diversity, Equity and Justice

Later, it will be the first union to win a strike against the California agricultural industry, which already has become a powerful force. 1904 The U.S. establishes the first border patrol as a way to keep Asian laborers from entering the country by way of Mexico. After Marriage Equality, What? Supreme Court rules states must allow same-sex marriage. In the 5-4 ruling, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote for the majority with the four liberal justices.

Supreme Court rules states must allow same-sex marriage

Each of the four conservative justices wrote their own dissent. Nearly 46 years to the day after a riot at New York's Stonewall Inn ushered in the modern gay rights movement, the decision could settle one of the major civil rights fights of this era. The language of Kennedy's opinion spoke eloquently of the most fundamental values of family, love and liberty. "No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family," Kennedy wrote. "In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than they once were. " 'Equal dignity in the eyes of the law' "Their hope," Kennedy wrote, "is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization's oldest institutions.

In a dissent, Justice Antonin Scalia blasted the Court's "threat to American democracy. " Obama: 'Congratulations' 14 couples Sgt. Title IX: Let 'em Play. Selma - The Bridge to the Ballot. Teaching Tolerance - Diversity, Equity and Justice. On March 7, 1965, 600 civil rights activists left Selma, Alabama, on foot, marching for dignity and equality.Eighteen days, 54 miles, one police attack, 1,900 National Guard troops, 2,000 U.S.

Teaching Tolerance - Diversity, Equity and Justice

Army soldiers and countless stories later, they arrived in Montgomery — and changed history. This film tells the story of a courageous group of students and teachers who, along with other activists, fought a nonviolent battle to win voting rights for African Americans in the South. Standing in their way: a century of Jim Crow, a resistant and segregationist state, and a federal government slow to fully embrace equality.

By organizing and marching bravely in the face of intimidation, violence, arrest and even murder, these change-makers achieved one of the most significant victories of the civil rights era. The Selma-to-Montgomery legacy includes the sacrifices of young people whose history is seldom told. Teachers can order this kit for free. The kit includes: Want to know more?