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Oh Joy Sex Toy: Genitalia 101. This Is What Consent Looks Like At a Kink Festival. The annual Folsom Street Fair in San Francisco is a time to take sex to the streets.

This Is What Consent Looks Like At a Kink Festival

The event that started in 1984 largely as a celebration of leather culture is now a massive converge of alternative sexualities of all stripes, with an estimated 400,000 people crowding Folsom Street in marvelous regalia. It’s not unusual to see someone dressed as a slutty Sailor Moon staging a bondage demonstration on the asphalt while onlookers decked out in leather body-suits and crotch-less police uniforms applaud. An uninformed observer at Folsom Street Fair might suspect that people separated from each other by only a smile and a pair of sneakers would be struggling with keeping their hands to themselves. But one thing that’s often misunderstood in mainstream coverage of kink culture is that BDSM has consent at its core. Learning the rules of consent is important for everyone trying to get kinky in a shared space. Related Reading: Safe Words — The History of Anti-Abuse Activism in BDSM. Safe Words. Illustrations and buttons by Caroline O'Grady For years I would jokingly explain to my confused, nonkinky friends that the site FetLife "is just Facebook for us perverts.

Safe Words

" Then, in the summer of 2012, I began seeing FetLife's name in the headlines of blogs that for the most part barely acknowledged kink's existence. That summer, the leading BDSM social-networking site had asked its users to suggest improvements—and they received a surprising response. Users formed the so-called Proposition 429, demanding that FetLife allow its users to name abusers within the community. It was a significant request, as the site's terms of use explicitly prohibit the lodging of criminal accusations against other users on the site. Many users didn't buy FetLife's argument, however. After the proposition was ignored by site administrators, several notes and event pages were formed encouraging other users to stop all donations to the site. Romantic kissing is not a universal thing, apparently. I’m going to start by admitting something: I have put my tongue in more than one other person’s mouth in order to experience erotic pleasure.

Romantic kissing is not a universal thing, apparently

I have also allowed more than one person to put his tongue in my mouth, once again for the romantic-sexual endorphins that start flowing from a good make-out. Kissing is a universal tool for that, right? Well, maybe not, according to a group of researchers from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. In an article for American Anthropologist, a team led by William R. Jankowiak explains that while some forms of kissing are universal, romantic kissing might not make the cut. On ne peut pas dire "tant pis pour vous" à ceux qui n'ont pas de vie affective et sexuelle 

SEXUALITÉ - Il ne faut pas se mentir ni nier une réalité, il y a des personnes en situation de handicap qui n'ont pas de vie affective et sexuelle en raison de leur handicap et qui sont en souffrance.

On ne peut pas dire "tant pis pour vous" à ceux qui n'ont pas de vie affective et sexuelle 

On ne peut pas dire "tant pis pour vous" à une personne qui a une atrophie des membres supérieurs et ne peut pas se toucher! On ne peut pas dire "tant pis pour vous" à un couple de personnes en situation de handicap qui ne peut pas avoir de rapport sexuel sans aide humaine! On ne peut pas dire "tant pis pour vous" à quelqu'un qui vous dit "Je ne veux pas mourir sans avoir fait l'amour une fois dans ma vie"! Quand les femmes avaient nettement plus besoin de sexe que les hommes.

Et comment le stéréotype s’est inversé.

Quand les femmes avaient nettement plus besoin de sexe que les hommes

Traduction d’un article publié par la sociologue américaine Alyssa Goldstein sur le site Alternet.org. Ninon de Lenclos, gravure de Antoine-Jean-Baptiste Coupé J’inaugure aujourd’hui la catégorie traduction. Il y a concernant les histoires de couple, de sexe et de genre, une réelle richesse à aller voir ce qui se dit en dehors de notre cocon culturel francophone et néanmoins un peu autiste. Je vous traduis donc cet article remarquable, publié le 19 mars 2013 sous le titre original When Women Wanted Sex Much More Than Men – And how the stereotype flipped, et qui me parle énormément puisque j’aime bien tout ce qui bouscule les idées reçues et remet un peu les pendules à l’heure en matière de sexe et de stéréotypes sexuels.

Partie I : l’ère des salopes Au début du XVIIe siècle, un homme du nom de James Mattlock fut expulsé de sa paroisse à Boston. Mais le changement était clairement en route. L’article est en trois parties. Sur le même thème. When Women Wanted Sex Much More Than Men. In the 1600s, a man named James Mattock was expelled from the First Church of Boston.

When Women Wanted Sex Much More Than Men

His crime? It wasn’t using lewd language or smiling on the sabbath or anything else that we might think the Puritans had disapproved of. Rather, James Mattock had refused to have sex with his wife for two years. Though Mattock’s community clearly saw his self-deprivation as improper, it is quite possible that they had his wife’s suffering in mind when they decided to shun him.

The Puritans believed that sexual desire was a normal and natural part of human life for both men and women (as long as it was heterosexual and confined to marriage), but that women wanted and needed sex more than men. Yet today, the idea that men are more interested in sex than women is so pervasive that it seems almost unremarkable. The idea that men are naturally more interested in sex than women is ubiquitous that it’s difficult to imagine that people ever believed differently. Yet the times were clearly changing.