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Trey Parker & Matt Stone - SouthPark Creators. The future of space with Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Pamela Gay, and Lawrence Krauss discuss our future in space. Cool gadgets for creative offices. Paint Moss Graffiti - Step-by-Step Guides for Offbeat DIY Projects. 10 Awesome Online Classes You Can Take For Free. Cool, but you need iTunes for nearly everything, and that gets an 'F.' Are there really no other places to get these lessons?

10 Awesome Online Classes You Can Take For Free

I was sure there are some on Academic Earth. Flagged. Scientists Discover The Oldest, Largest Body Of Water In Existence. Scientists have found the biggest and oldest reservoir of water ever--so large and so old, it’s almost impossible to describe.

Scientists Discover The Oldest, Largest Body Of Water In Existence

The water is out in space, a place we used to think of as desolate and desert dry, but it's turning out to be pretty lush. Researchers found a lake of water so large that it could provide each person on Earth an entire planet’s worth of water--20,000 times over. Yes, so much water out there in space that it could supply each one of us all the water on Earth--Niagara Falls, the Pacific Ocean, the polar ice caps, the puddle in the bottom of the canoe you forgot to flip over--20,000 times over. The water is in a cloud around a huge black hole that is in the process of sucking in matter and spraying out energy (such an active black hole is called a quasar), and the waves of energy the black hole releases make water by literally knocking hydrogen and oxygen atoms together.

The new cloud of water is enough to supply 28 galaxies with water. 7.014 Introductory Biology. Logy Magazine. A turning point in the history of life occurred 2 billion to 3 billion years ago with the unprecedented appearance and dramatic rise of molecular oxygen.

logy Magazine

Now researchers report they have identified an enzyme that was the first – or among the first – to generate molecular oxygen on Earth. The new findings, reported in the journal Structure, build on more than a dozen previous studies that aim to track the molecular evolution of life by looking for evidence of that history in present-day protein structures. These studies, led by University of Illinois crop sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology professor Gustavo Caetano-Anollés, focus on structurally and functionally distinct regions of proteins – called folds – that are part of the universal tool kit of living cells. Protein folds are much more stable than the sequences of amino acids that compose them, Caetano-Anollés said. Mutations or other changes in sequence often occur without disrupting fold structure or function.