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Power Dressing - Vogue Style Tips. How did 50 years of feminism end in THIS? Asks SARAH VINE. 'I’m not a zealot but I’d burn a Victoria’s Secret bra' says Sarah Vine She says the brand specialises in tiny, extremely uncomfortable underwearThe show took place in Earl's Court in London Some of the 3,000-strong audience had paid up to £10,000 to attend 47 of the Angels descended on the catwalk The Angels have strict fitness and diet regimes to keep them in shape'This is a world where how you look is the only thing that matters' By Sarah Vine for the Daily Mail Published: 22:05 GMT, 3 December 2014 | Updated: 17:52 GMT, 4 December 2014.

How did 50 years of feminism end in THIS? Asks SARAH VINE

The Victoria's Secret "Fashion Show": A Feminist... Chanel’s Karl Lagerfeld cheered and jeered for ‘feminist’ fashion statement. On Tuesday 30 September 2014 the unthinkable happened: feminism entered the realm of high fashion.

Chanel’s Karl Lagerfeld cheered and jeered for ‘feminist’ fashion statement

Emma Watson: 'I'm a feminist because I've known sexism since I was eight years old' I was appointed six months ago and the more I have spoken about feminism the more I have realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating.

Emma Watson: 'I'm a feminist because I've known sexism since I was eight years old'

If there is one thing I know for certain, it is that this has to stop. For the record, feminism by definition is: “The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.” I decided I was a feminist. Emma Watson's UN speech inspired this incredible letter from a 15-year-old boy - People - News - The Independent. As part of her role as UN Women Goodwill ambassador, the actress spoke at the launch of the #HeForShe initiative, which calls on men to fight sexism.

Emma Watson's UN speech inspired this incredible letter from a 15-year-old boy - People - News - The Independent

Beyonce pens open feminist essay: ‘We need to stop buying into the myth of gender equality’ - News - People - The Independent. Not to mention her refusal to call herself a feminist during an interview with British Vogue for the May 2013 edition ("That word can be very extreme," she told them).

Beyonce pens open feminist essay: ‘We need to stop buying into the myth of gender equality’ - News - People - The Independent

Review: Beyonce's New Album Is An Unashamed Celebration Of Very Physical Virtues But Beyoncé, it seems, is determined to claw back some of her "Independent Women" audience. In fact, she’s penned an entire essay on the subject of gender equality on behalf of the Shriver Report’s recent findings that 42 million women in the USA are either living in poverty or are on the brink of living in poverty. "We need to stop buying into the myth about gender equality," the singer writes in her piece, titled ‘Gender Equality Is A Myth!’. "It isn’t a reality yet. "But unless women and men both say this is unacceptable, things will not change.

Why Beyonce Went Shopping In Walmart For Her Own Album "Humanity requires both men and women, and we are equally important and need one another. Beyonce Recorded 'More Than 80 Tracks' For New Album. Beyoncé samples Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's call to feminism. Reading on mobile?

Beyoncé samples Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's call to feminism

Click to view The Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie makes a surprise appearance on Beyoncé's latest album, released on iTunes this morning, declaiming: "We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls 'You can have ambition, but not too much'. " The novelist's intervention comes during the track ***Flawless, appearing as a series of samples from her impassioned TEDxEuston talk, "We should all be feminists". During the speech, the Orange prize-winning author argues that differing expectations of men and women damage economic and social prospects in Nigeria, and more generally around Africa and the world. Beyoncé has been particularly inspired by sections where Adichie explores attitudes towards marriage, sampling a passage where the novelist talks directly about aspirations. NO FILTER: An Afternoon With Kim Kardashian.

Mikimoto necklaces and earrings, customized dress and vintage gloves If you know nothing else about Kim Kardashian, you know that she is very, very famous. that's all you need to know. , she has 25 million Twitter followers, about a million less than Oprah Winfrey and nearly 5 million more than CNN Breaking News. where she is a prolific , is the site's third most popular.

NO FILTER: An Afternoon With Kim Kardashian

Beyonce MTV VMAs feminist performance: Twitter reacts to singer's 'double standard' - News - Music. Not Nicki Minaj undergoing a wardrobe malfunction, Miley Cyrus asking a homeless man to accept her award or Katy Perry dressed as Britney Spears, but a picture of Beyoncé performing in front of a giant neon ‘Feminist’ sign.

Beyonce MTV VMAs feminist performance: Twitter reacts to singer's 'double standard' - News - Music

During her 15 minute performance, the singer used a sample from novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED speech “We should all be feminists” in her song “Flawless”. Many took to Twitter to praise Beyoncé for promoting feminism through popular culture and for helping to break down the negative stigma surrounding the word. However, others were concerned that the singer’s version of feminism appeared to have been interpreted as overt objectification, pointing to lyrics such as “Bow Down Bitches” and her sexually provocative dancing.

The singer reluctantly called herself a feminist in an interview with US Vogue last year, saying: “That word can be very extreme…But I guess I am a modern-day feminist.” Beyonc-queen-of-pop-queen-of-the-rich-list-9840778. In 2013, the superstar brought in $53 million.

beyonc-queen-of-pop-queen-of-the-rich-list-9840778

This year, she raked in a tidy $115 million. According to Forbes and Pollstar, during the period surveyed Beyoncé played 95 shows and on average she took home $2.4 million per city. The release of her self-titled surprise album in December 2013 also helped boost the singer's earnings. BBC Religion & Ethics - The re-birth of an icon: she can do it. 11 February 2013Last updated at 17:18 By Flavia Di Consiglio BBC Religion and Ethics The "We Can Do It" poster is also known as "Rosie the Riveter" - but mistakenly so Seventy years ago, a poster featuring a young woman flexing her arm muscle was about to appear on the walls of an American factory.

BBC Religion & Ethics - The re-birth of an icon: she can do it

Today, she is a worldwide icon of female strength, struggle and empowerment. So why does this image keep coming back into popular culture? Powerful Men Talk More, Powerful Women Don't Because It Damages Their Likeability, Power, and Effectiveness. The depths of societies ingrained sexism -- and the degree to which successful women understand it is a fact of life that requires constant vigalance and adjustment -- never ceases to amaze and trouble me. A new study in the Administrative Science Quarterly (Volume 56, pages 622-641) by Yale faculty member Victoria L.

Brescoll presents a trio of studies that examine gender, power, and volubility (talking time). The headline above contains the upshot. Jordin Sparks Slams Ex-Boyfriend Jason DeRulo in New Song. Jordin Sparks and Jason DeRulo split up after four years together(Getty) Did the Dagenham women's equal pay fight make a difference? 30 September 2010Last updated at 05:45 By Claire Heald and Caroline McClatchey BBC News A new film portrays women's battle for equal pay at Ford's Essex plant in the 1960s.

But as the pay gap between working men and women endures, how much difference did they make? The spotlight falls on the women of the Ford car plant in Dagenham, Essex, this week, just as it did when they got up from their sewing machines and walked out on strike in 1968. Their story is the subject of a new British film, Made in Dagenham. It tells how 187 car-seat cover machinists challenged the accepted norm and took industrial action in the battle to get their work recognised as skilled and equal to their male colleagues. It follows the women as they brought car production at the bedrock of UK car manufacture to a halt, prompted the lay-off of thousands of workers and was only solved with the intervention of then secretary of state, Barbara Castle.