Requirements

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Vincent Jordan | a Digital Experience » Should your Product manager be the Product Owner In some larger organizations, you may find that these two roles are split. And although I heavily disagree with this decision, they aren’t technically wrong. Truth is the founders of Scrum didn’t explicitly say that the Product Owner is the Product Manager. If they had, the role of a Product Owner wouldn’t be so ambiguous. Vincent Jordan | a Digital Experience » Should your Product manager be the Product Owner
Product Owners – Do you OWN your product? « Bring the RIGHT Product to the Market Faster Product Owners – Do you OWN your product? « Bring the RIGHT Product to the Market Faster “The Product Owner The Product Owner is responsible for maximizing the value of the product and the work of the Development Team. How this is done may vary widely across organizations, Scrum Teams, and individuals. The Product Owner is the sole person responsible for managing the Product Backlog. Product Backlog management includes:
Project Management (4) A project plan takes into account the approach the team will take and helps the team and stakeholders document decisions made regarding the objective, scope, schedule, resources, and... Creating an interdisciplinary team with the right mix of skills is vital to the smooth and successful execution of any project. Team members may be able to cover multiple roles or there may... Use your kick-off meeting to discuss the business case related to the site, the vision and mission based on user and organizational goals, and the vision for the site moving forward. Website requirements are a list of necessary functions, capabilities, or characteristics related to your website and the plans for creating it. Create Scenarios

Create Scenarios

All these three terms are used to describe the behavior of an application. They come from different process methodologies, and have different meanings, characteristics and are intended to be used differently. Larry Guger also discuss these aspects and several others in his blog entries http://continuouslyintegrating.blogspot.com/2009/07/use-cases-and-visual-studio-2010-part-1.html and http://continuouslyintegrating.blogspot.com/2009/07/beginning-use-cases-identifying-actors.html. The Use Case is the term used in UML and in the different Unified Process based methodologies. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Use_case for a good overall description. A use case is often looked upon as a more formal way of describing behavior, and which has to be accompanied by a detailed description following certain rules. Use Cases, User Stories and Scenarios - what are they - and how do they relate to TFS 2010 Use Cases, User Stories and Scenarios - what are they - and how do they relate to TFS 2010
What’s in a Story? « DanNorth.net [This article has been translated into Korean by HongJoo Lee, French by Philippe Poumaroux and Spanish by Adrian Moya.] Behaviour-driven development is an “outside-in” methodology. It starts at the outside by identifying business outcomes, and then drills down into the feature set that will achieve those outcomes. Each feature is captured as a “story”, which defines the scope of the feature along with its acceptance criteria. This article introduces the BDD approach to defining and identifying stories and their acceptance criteria. What’s in a Story? « DanNorth.net
User Stories:Lack of Big Picture Leads to Blind Man Product One of the Scrum values is “Focus”. It can make or mar a product. It brings direction to the development of a product – from start to finish; and is the back-bone of an effective business strategy. User Stories:Lack of Big Picture Leads to Blind Man Product
An introduction to personas and how to create them » Step Two Designs, Tina Calabria

An introduction to personas and how to create them » Step Two Designs, Tina Calabria

Written by Tina Calabria, published March 2nd, 2004 Categorised under: articles, intranets, usability & information architecture, websites Before embarking on any intranet or website design project, it is important to understand the needs of your users.
5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories Most of the issues with gathering requirements in agile software development and agile testing derive from issues with User Stories. Somehow expressing requirements in such a simple form causes a lot of trouble to agile teams. Of course art of writing good User Stories is the most difficult for new teams starting with a new agile project or these, which freshly transformed development methods to agile software development methodologies. Mistakes made at that point lead to wrong Test Cases, wrong understanding of requirements, and the worst of all wrong implementation which can be direct cause of rejecting the deliverables of the iteration. Lets take a look at the five most common mistakes people make writing User Stories. 5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories
The Easy Way to Writing Good User Stories The Easy Way to Writing Good User Stories Many development shops have opted to writing user stories over traditional feature/requirement documents; however, almost all of them struggle when writing their first batch of user stories. This is not at all uncommon, just like riding a bike, it does take a little bit of practice (but once you get it – you get it). Writing user stories is dead simple if you follow these simple steps:
User Story Example User Story Example I recently described User Stories and the composition of a User Story Card – Card, Conversation and Confirmation. I’m not really sure if you would consider this user story example to be good, bad or indifferent – I guess it depends what you’re used to – but here is an example nevertheless! This is the front of the card.

Introduction to User Stories

1. Introduction to User Stories A good way to think about a user story is that it is a reminder to have a conversation with your customer (in XP, project stakeholders are called customers), which is another way to say it's a reminder to do some just-in-time analysis.
How to write meaningful User Stories - Subcide I’ve seen a lot of projects fail when by all accounts, they shouldn’t have. The reason for this nearly every time, was that the requirements gathering stage of a project was done poorly, or sometimes not at all. Sometimes this is driven by budget or deadline constraints, and sometimes it’s because the people responsible are just unaware of how to go about gathering requirements in a structured manner, and if you’re one of those people, or know one of those people, then please read on. Requirements exist to make sure that what you think you are building, is the same as what the client or stakeholder thinks you are building. Requirements serve many purposes, but when you strip them down to their core, requirements exist to make sure that what you think you are building, is the same as what the client or stakeholder thinks you are building. Because of this, they should be as easy to read and understand as possible, which things like functional specification documents usually aren’t.
One of the myths of Agile software development is that documentation is not required or useful. It is true that one of the core values within the Agile Manifesto is "Working Software over Comprehensive Documentation." However, note the word "over" in this statement. The Manifesto is not saying no documentation; it's saying there is a preference for working software over documentation. Agile Requirements Definition and Management