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The 6 Major Skills for 21st Century Students

The 6 Major Skills for 21st Century Students
January, 2015 Here is a short two pages PDF document from ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) which features the six major fluencies (standards) students need to develop in the 21st century classroom. Each of these fluencies is broken down into various skills all of which work in unison to cultivate the target fluency. From all the resources I have shared here on the 21st century teaching and learning, this document is by far the most comprehensive and practical. It touches on almost all the skills and competencies required to build an intellectually, socially, culturally, and digitally apt student. Here is a quick round-up of the six major fluencies included and you can access and download the the full document from this LINK. 1 - Creativity and innovation “Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology”

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2015/01/the-6-major-skills-for-21st-century-students.html

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What is digital literacy? CC licensed photo shared via Flickr by s@lly Digital literacy is the topic that made the ETMOOC learning space so irresistible to me… I think as educators we spout off about wanting our students to be digitally literate, but not many of us (myself included) have a firm grasp about what that actually means, and quite a number of us are still attempting to become digitally literate ourselves. Whatever that means. It turns out, defining digital literacy isn’t such an easy task. The etmooc community was fortunate enough to hear Doug Belshaw speak on this topic in a recent webinar.

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