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The 100 Best Children's Books of All Time

The 100 Best Children's Books of All Time
We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the… We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the likes of Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, they’ve produced characters and conceits that have become the currency of our pop-culture discourse—and inspired some of our best writers to contribute to the genre. To honor the best books for young adults and children, TIME compiled this survey in consultation with respected peers such as U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate Kenn Nesbitt, children’s-book historian Leonard Marcus, the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, the Young Readers Center at the Library of Congress, the Every Child a Reader literacy foundation and 10 independent booksellers. The List: 100 Best Children's Books of All Time HarperCollins

http://time.com/100-best-childrens-books/

Related:  School LibrariesTo ReadAwards and Best of Lists

School Library Guidelines, 2nd edition by IFLA School Libraries Standing Committee, Dianne Oberg and Barbara Schultz-Jones (Eds.) This is the new edition of the School Library Guidelines, approved by the IFLA Professional Committee in June 2015. These guidelines constitute the second edition of the IFLA ‘School Library Guidelines’. Top 10 first lines in children's and teen books The boy and the old man arrived at the port at night. That's the first line in my debut novel, Close to the Wind, and I'm rather proud of it. The line doesn't shout out at you, but it does a lot of work establishing the tone of the book and giving you the setting and characters without any fuss. It's always difficult to know how to begin a book. Originally, I had a much bolder first line but during an editorial meeting it was suggested I lose it and start with the second line in. Of course, I objected.

Great stories never grow old! Chosen by children’s librarians at The New York Public Library, these 100 inspiring tales have thrilled generations of children and their parents — and are still flying off our shelves. Use this list and your library card to discover new worlds of wonder and adventure! School Libraries and Makerspaces: Can They Coexist? More and more schools are coming to value maker education and exploring ways to create makerspaces in their schools. Many schools are discussing how they might utilize their library to facilitate this. As my school has increased our commitment to constructionist learning and maker education over the last few years, we have done so in close collaboration with our school library. In exploring the relationship between the school library and school makerspace, it's not difficult to see why conversations about the growth of makerspaces are often tied to the conversation about the future of libraries.

The 4 Facets of Information Literacy When talking to instructors about what information literacy is, I’m not the biggest fan of referring to its commonly accepted definition: “Information literacy is the ability to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.” Why? Because in order to embrace it, support it, and implement it in their courses, instructors need a description that more precisely breaks down the skill sets involved in information literacy so that they can determine how those skills best fit within the context of their courses. That’s where the instructional design skill of task analysis comes in (which also requires overcoming one’s expert blindspot).

My hero: Mary Shelley by Neil Gaiman The cold, wet summer of 1816, a night of ghost stories and a challenge allowed a young woman to delineate the darkness, and give us a way of looking at the world. They were in a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva: Lord Byron – the bestselling poet, too dangerous for the drawing rooms of England and in exile; his doctor, John William Polidori; Percy Shelley, poet and atheist, and his soon-to-be wife, 18-year-old Mary Shelley. Ghost stories were read, and then Byron challenged everyone in the group to come up with a new story. He started, but did not finish, one about vampires; Polidori completed "The Vampyre"; and young Mary, already the mother of a living child and a dead one, imagined a story about a man who fabricated a living creature, a monster, and brought it to life.

7 October 2013 We celebrate Children's Book Week with Amazon Kindle by announcing our list of 100 books every child should read before they're 14. Drawing from over 90 years' experience of recommending children’s books, our experts have put together a list of the 100 best children's books for Children's Book Week 2013. We're now asking everyone to join the debate and vote online for their favourites from the list - with the nation’s top books announced on 25 November. The exciting 100 combines an eclectic mix of traditional classics and modern greats that we believe are must-reads to fire children’s imaginations and turn them into life-long readers. The cut-off age of 14 was chosen as beyond that, children tend to progress to more adult literature. Helping Students Become Better Online Researchers Your students are probably Internet authorities. When it comes to Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, they might know far more than you. All of that time spent tweeting and chatting doesn’t necessarily translate to deep learning though.

Jane Corry Supports School Libraries Jane CorryMultnomah County Library Why are School Libraries Important? They not only foster a love of reading (the only place in schools that have the time to focus on that) and they are centers of not only technology but instruction in how to use and evaluate the information they come across, Navigating and evaluating information is not taught anywhere else. How has a School Librarian or Library Impacted You? As a public librarian I can see the difference in informational sophistication between schools that have a librarians and those that don’t. How Does the Work of School Libraries Impact Your Work as a Library Professional or Person?

While Some Are Shocked by ‘Go Set a Watchman,’ Others Find Nuance in a Bigoted Atticus Finch “Whether you’ve read the novel or seen the film, there’s this image you have of Atticus as a hero, and this brings him down a peg,” said Adam Bergstein, an English teacher in Queens whose 10th- and 11-grade students read “Mockingbird.” “How do you take this guy who everybody looked up to for the last 50-plus years, and now he’s a more flawed individual?” In this version, Atticus is 72 years old, suffering from arthritis and stubbornly resistant to social change. He stands in sharp contrast to the gentle scholar in “Mockingbird,” who tells Scout, when explaining why he has gone out on a limb to defend a black man, that “I do my best to love everybody.” In “Watchman,” which comes out Tuesday, Atticus chides Scout for her idealistic views about racial equality: “The Negroes down here are still in their childhood as a people.” After the initial shock, some writers and literary critics see added value in a more complex, and flawed, version of Atticus.

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