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The 100 Best Children's Books of All Time

The 100 Best Children's Books of All Time
We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the… We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the likes of Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, they’ve produced characters and conceits that have become the currency of our pop-culture discourse—and inspired some of our best writers to contribute to the genre. To honor the best books for young adults and children, TIME compiled this survey in consultation with respected peers such as U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate Kenn Nesbitt, children’s-book historian Leonard Marcus, the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, the Young Readers Center at the Library of Congress, the Every Child a Reader literacy foundation and 10 independent booksellers. The List: 100 Best Children's Books of All Time HarperCollins Related:  To ReadSchool LibrariesAwards and Best of Lists

Top 10 first lines in children's and teen books | Children's books The boy and the old man arrived at the port at night. That's the first line in my debut novel, Close to the Wind, and I'm rather proud of it. The line doesn't shout out at you, but it does a lot of work establishing the tone of the book and giving you the setting and characters without any fuss. It's always difficult to know how to begin a book. Originally, I had a much bolder first line but during an editorial meeting it was suggested I lose it and start with the second line in. Of course, I objected. An opening sentence should draw the reader from their own head and take them somewhere completely different. It was a dark, blustery afternoon in spring, and the city of London was chasing a small mining town across the dried out bed of the old North Sea. 1. Is this the best ever opening line from a children's book? The first thing you find out when yer dog learns to talk is that dogs don't got nothing much to say. 2. A great book that's all about the voice and he nails it in the first line.

School Library Guidelines, 2nd edition by IFLA School Libraries Standing Committee, Barbara Schultz-Jones and Dianne Oberg (Eds.) This is the new edition of the School Library Guidelines, approved by the IFLA Professional Committee in June 2015. These guidelines constitute the second edition of the IFLA ‘School Library Guidelines’. The first edition of the school library guidelines was developed in 2002 by the School Libraries Section, then called the School Libraries and Resource Centers Section. These guidelines have been developed to assist school library professionals and educational decision-makers in their efforts to ensure that all students and teachers have access to effective school library programs and services, delivered by qualified school library personnel. The drafting of these revised guidelines involved discussion, debate and consultation with many people from many countries at workshops during IFLA conferences and mid-year meetings and through ongoing writing and review in person and online. Download

The Cartoon Introduction to Economics, Volume 1: Microeconomics : Stand-Up Economist Ask your local bookstore for my new book (co-authored with Grady Klein), or you can order it for just $12 from Amazon.com or B&N. (PS to buyers and bloggers: Please use the links above: at no extra cost to you, a few more pennies go to me instead of Jeff Bezos.) Update: Volume Two: Macroeconomics came out in Jan 2012! Scroll down for excerpts, reviews, corrections, and information for teachers, including page notes and PPTs! Comedy/book tour Details about upcoming shows here, please contact me to bring economics comedy to your school, corporate event, or comedy club! Excerpts Below is one of my favorite chapters! Reviews From the back cover of the book: “Learning economics should be fun. Reviews on the web (I’ll add more as they cross my desk) include kind words from Univ of Chicago econ department chair Harald Uhlig (who writes on Amazon that “This is a wonderful and humorous introduction to microeconomics!”) Corrections Information for teachers Detailed page notes (and haiku summaries!)

The 100 Best Young-Adult Books of All Time We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the… We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the likes of Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, they’ve produced characters and conceits that have become the currency of our pop-culture discourse—and inspired some of our best writers to contribute to the genre. To honor the best books for young adults and children, TIME compiled this survey in consultation with respected peers such as U.S. LIST: The 100 Best Young Adult Books of All Time Little, Brown The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (Buy here) By Sherman Alexie. See 17 authors’ favorite books for young readers. Read about how author Meg Wolitzer was inspired by Sylvia Plath’s Bell Jar. It’s your turn:

100 Great Children’s Books | 100 Years Great stories never grow old! Chosen by children’s librarians at The New York Public Library, these 100 inspiring tales have thrilled generations of children and their parents — and are still flying off our shelves. Use this list and your library card to discover new worlds of wonder and adventure! 100 Great Children’s Books has been published on the occasion of The New York Public Library’s acclaimed exhibition The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter, on view at the Stephen A. The Library Shop is offering special discounts on themed book sets from the 100 Great Children's Books list. Download the PDF or browse the list below. What’s on your list of great children’s books? #GreatChildrensBooks | facebook.com/NYPL Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst, illustrated by Ray Cruz (1972)It was enough to make you want to go to Australia. All-of-a-Kind Family Amelia Bedelia The Arrival by Shaun Tan (2007)Feel what it’s like to travel to a strange new land. Mr.

My hero: Mary Shelley by Neil Gaiman The cold, wet summer of 1816, a night of ghost stories and a challenge allowed a young woman to delineate the darkness, and give us a way of looking at the world. They were in a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva: Lord Byron – the bestselling poet, too dangerous for the drawing rooms of England and in exile; his doctor, John William Polidori; Percy Shelley, poet and atheist, and his soon-to-be wife, 18-year-old Mary Shelley. Ghost stories were read, and then Byron challenged everyone in the group to come up with a new story. He started, but did not finish, one about vampires; Polidori completed "The Vampyre"; and young Mary, already the mother of a living child and a dead one, imagined a story about a man who fabricated a living creature, a monster, and brought it to life. Ideas happen when the time is right for them. Brian Aldiss points to Frankenstein as the first work of science fiction (which he defines as hubris clobbered by nemesis) and he may be right.

The 4 Facets of Information Literacy When talking to instructors about what information literacy is, I’m not the biggest fan of referring to its commonly accepted definition: “Information literacy is the ability to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.” Why? Because in order to embrace it, support it, and implement it in their courses, instructors need a description that more precisely breaks down the skill sets involved in information literacy so that they can determine how those skills best fit within the context of their courses. That’s where the instructional design skill of task analysis comes in (which also requires overcoming one’s expert blindspot). What specific skill sets are needed for one to become information literate? The 4 Facets of Information Literacy Information Technology Fluency Ways of Thinking Librarians generally teach ways of thinking about information in the context of evaluating information. Problem Solving Like this:

In my good books... | Reading, thinking and drinking tea. The Ultimate List: Our 100 best children's books 7 October 2013 We celebrate Children's Book Week with Amazon Kindle by announcing our list of 100 books every child should read before they're 14. Drawing from over 90 years' experience of recommending children’s books, our experts have put together a list of the 100 best children's books for Children's Book Week 2013. We're now asking everyone to join the debate and vote online for their favourites from the list - with the nation’s top books announced on 25 November. The exciting 100 combines an eclectic mix of traditional classics and modern greats that we believe are must-reads to fire children’s imaginations and turn them into life-long readers. The cut-off age of 14 was chosen as beyond that, children tend to progress to more adult literature. Claire Shanahan, Head of Arts at Book Trust, said: We want to celebrate Children's Book Week by starting a discussion about the very best books for children. Take a look at the books on our list Find out more about Children's Book Week 2013

While Some Are Shocked by ‘Go Set a Watchman,’ Others Find Nuance in a Bigoted Atticus Finch “Whether you’ve read the novel or seen the film, there’s this image you have of Atticus as a hero, and this brings him down a peg,” said Adam Bergstein, an English teacher in Queens whose 10th- and 11-grade students read “Mockingbird.” “How do you take this guy who everybody looked up to for the last 50-plus years, and now he’s a more flawed individual?” In this version, Atticus is 72 years old, suffering from arthritis and stubbornly resistant to social change. He stands in sharp contrast to the gentle scholar in “Mockingbird,” who tells Scout, when explaining why he has gone out on a limb to defend a black man, that “I do my best to love everybody.” In “Watchman,” which comes out Tuesday, Atticus chides Scout for her idealistic views about racial equality: “The Negroes down here are still in their childhood as a people.” After the initial shock, some writers and literary critics see added value in a more complex, and flawed, version of Atticus. Photo It is unclear why Ms. Ms. While A.

Jane Corry Supports School Libraries | Urban Librarians Unite Jane CorryMultnomah County Library Why are School Libraries Important? They not only foster a love of reading (the only place in schools that have the time to focus on that) and they are centers of not only technology but instruction in how to use and evaluate the information they come across, Navigating and evaluating information is not taught anywhere else. How has a School Librarian or Library Impacted You? As a public librarian I can see the difference in informational sophistication between schools that have a librarians and those that don’t. How Does the Work of School Libraries Impact Your Work as a Library Professional or Person? For the first time we are seeing strong language protecting School Libraries in national education policy. Find your Elected Official in the House Contact your Representative to let them know how essential this bill is to our children’s education and futures. Talking points Vote Yes on the Every Student Succeeds Act Conference Report.

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