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How to Make Difficult Conversations Easy: 7 Steps From a Clinical Psychologist

How to Make Difficult Conversations Easy: 7 Steps From a Clinical Psychologist
Someone is screaming in your face at the top of their lungs. Or ranting angrily and you can’t get a word in edgewise. Or maybe they’re sobbing so hard you can barely understand what they’re saying. We’ve all been there. These situations don’t happen a lot (thank god) but we all feel helpless when they do. And because they’re rare we don’t ever seem to get better at handling them. Problem is, these moments are often critical because they’re usually with people we care about. What’s the best way to handle these difficult conversations? I called someone who knows: Dr. Dinosaur Brains: Dealing with All Those Impossible People at Work Am I The Only Sane One Working Here? Emotional Vampires: Dealing With People Who Drain You Dry Here’s what you’ll learn in this post: Okay, time to wage war with the crazy. 1) First, You Need To Keep Calm You already have one person overreacting. Al calls the emotional side of our mind the “dinosaur brain.” If you stay calm, you can help someone escape its grip. Tags:

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Are You Ready to Manage? - People Development Network All businesses face continuous changes in the business environment. Long term business sustainability is directly linked to the ability to continuously improve and Adapt To Change. Along with globalization came increased competitiveness and in today’s economic circumstances one of the biggest pressures most businesses face, is financial pressure –the pressure to maintain or improve business results in the midst of increasing competitive forces. The downfall of many businesses lies in their attempt to address these pressures with strategies that proved successful in the past…in an environment that today no longer exists.

On How to Disagree We live in a world saturated with disagreement. People are at odds about pretty much everything from when to order a taxi, go out to dinner to whether there should there be a caliphate; from the kind of orbit the International Space Station should assume; the right way to cook lasagna to whether Hungary is in Eastern or Central Europe, and how long a child should be allowed to play Minecraft on a Saturday morning. While disagreement can be civilised, interesting and productive, it is much too frequently a powerful source of misery: we get enraged and bewildered; we are appalled at the views of others and feel intensely bothered by them; we feel defeated, hopeless and lonely; we agonise, rehearse the conflict alone in our heads, worry, feel guilty, get upset…

Aquaculture Solaiman Sheik shows off the harvest from his father’s small pond near Khulna, Bangladesh: freshwater prawns, a profitable export. The family also raises fish in the pond and, in the dry season, rice fertilized by fish waste—a polyculture that has tripled output with little environmental downside. Photograph by Jim Richardson In a dark, dank warehouse in the Blue Ridge foothills of Virginia, Bill Martin picks up a bucket of brown pellets and slings them into a long concrete tank.

Fundamental attribution error In social psychology, the fundamental attribution error, also known as the correspondence bias or attribution effect, is the tendency for people to place an undue emphasis on internal characteristics (personality) to explain someone else's behavior in a given situation rather than considering the situation's external factors. It does not explain interpretations of one's own behavior, where situational factors are more easily recognized and can thus be taken into consideration. Conversely, from the other perspective, this error is known as the actor–observer bias, in which people tend to overemphasize the role of a situation in their behaviors and underemphasize the role of their own personalities. Examples[edit] Alice, a driver, is about to pass through an intersection.

The One Conversational Tool That Will Make You Better At Absolutely Everything Ask yourself: If you could interview like Walter Cronkite, would you get more value from your meetings? Would your mentors become more valuable? Would your chance encounters with executives in elevators and thought leaders in conferences yield action items and relationships? 3 Ways To Energise The Team Using Different Language I help leaders develop self- mastery, helping them to become confident in their own inner guidance. I collaborate with leadership experts, managers and HR professionals to help them get their own message and unique services and products to a wide audience. Using different expressions can energise the team My son had a bit of an “Aha moment” at the weekend.

Learning to Speak Up When You're from a Culture of Deference - Andy Molinsky by Andy Molinsky | 9:00 AM July 7, 2014 Many of us are uncomfortable speaking with people of higher status. We can feel self-conscious, unsure of what to say, and afraid what we’re going to say — or what we’re saying — is the wrong thing. After these conversations, we often replay in our heads what we said, analyze what we shouldn’t have said, or realize what we should have said but didn’t.

Ultimate attribution error The ultimate attribution error is a group-level attribution error that offers an explanation for how one person views different causes of negative and positive behavior in ingroup and outgroup members.[1] Ultimate attribution error is the tendency to internally attribute negative outgroup and positive ingroup behaviour and to externally attribute positive outgroup and negative ingroup behaviour. So in other words, ultimate attribution error arises as a way to explain an outgroup's negative behaviour as flaws in their personality, and to explain an outgroup's positive behaviour as a result of chance or circumstance. It is also the belief that positive acts performed by ingroup members are as a result of their personality, whereas, if an ingroup member behaves negatively (which is believed to be rare), it is a result of situational factors.[2] Overview[edit]

The Art of Rejection: How to NOT Give Out Your Phone Number Photo Credit Everyone recognizes how difficult it is to deal with rejection, but many overlook the fact that having to reject someone can be equally as difficult. In college, there are inevitably going to be scenarios where a guy asks for your phone number and you’re not interested. Allowing yourself to be guilted into giving out your personal information in order to avoid hurting someone’s ego is not the answer. Instead, try one of the strategies below to minimize the awkwardness the next time you want to withhold your digits: Put Safety First

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