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Golden Rules for Engaging Students in Learning Activities

Golden Rules for Engaging Students in Learning Activities
When we think of student engagement in learning activities, it is often convenient to understand engagement with an activity as being represented by good behavior (i.e. behavioral engagement), positive feelings (i.e. emotional engagement), and, above all, student thinking (i.e. cognitive engagement) (Fredricks, 2014). This is because students may be behaviorally and/or emotionally invested in a given activity without actually exerting the necessary mental effort to understand and master the knowledge, craft, or skill that the activity promotes. In light of this, research suggests that considering the following interrelated elements when designing and implementing learning activities may help increase student engagement behaviorally, emotionally, and cognitively, thereby positively affecting student learning and achievement. 1. Make It Meaningful In aiming for full engagement, it is essential that students perceive activities as being meaningful. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Research Ames, C. (1992).

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/golden-rules-for-engaging-students-nicolas-pino-james

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Make teaching more effective - New learning spaces - Library Subject Guides at RMIT University As in any other course, you will need to work out how you will chunk the learning for each class and create a teaching schedule for the course/unit which will satisfy the learning outcomes. Designing activities carefully will support students' learning and help them to be able to complete the assessment. This planning is not about what you will do but what your students will do in the time allocated ie. the activities you will get them to do. Backward design is one way to approach unit/course/lesson planning, “promoted by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe in their book, Understanding by Design (1998). Back to school Part 2: Relationships This series of #backtoschool blogs summarises much of my thinking as it’s developed over the past few years and is aimed at new or recently qualified teachers. Each area has been distilled to 5 ‘top tips’ which I hope prove useful to anyone embarking on a career in teaching. That said, I’ll be delighted if they serve as handy reminders for colleagues somewhat longer in the tooth. Once clear and sensible routines are in place, there’s space for positive relationships to form; without them, we are merely fire-fighting. Somewhat surprisingly perhaps, pupils prefer teachers they perceive as ‘stricter’ and want the reassurance of feeling safe, and knowing exactly where they stand. For some advice on managing behaviour, I refer you to Part 1 of this Back to School series.

COMICS IN THE CLASSROOM: How one Wissahickon teacher uses comic books to connect with his students - Ambler Gazette By Dutch Godshalkdgodshalk@21st-centurymedia.com@DutchGodshalk on Twitter Wissahickon High School social studies teacher Tim Smyth uses comic books in his class lessons. BOB RAINES -- DIGITAL FIRST MEDIA LOWER GWYNEDD >> A few years ago, Wissahickon High School social studies teacher Tim Smyth, a by-the-book AP instructor who had earned himself a reputation among students for being “very challenging,” did something unexpected. He started handing out comic books in his classes — lots of comic books.

Solutions and Templates What is a tangram and what is the purpose of a tangram? Tangrams are ancient, truly fascinating Chinese Puzzles, made up of seven movable geometrical shapes, with which you can create thousands of pictures and designs. Learn to make your own, the easy way. The purpose of this puzzle is to use all seven pieces or tans to create a picture or design. Classroom Rewards Reap Dividends for Teachers and Students All teachers prefer to rely on their students' intrinsic motivation to encourage them to come to school, do their homework, and focus on classroom activities, but many supplement the internal drive to succeed with external rewards. The teachers say rewards -- free time, school supplies, or tasty treats -- can help kids master the expectations of acceptable classroom behavior and scholastic achievement. Included: Ten tips for using rewards in the classroom! "I don't know if it is any more appropriate to use rewards with inner city students than other students, but I have seen it work," said Kristina Campbell, a fourth-grade teacher in Indianapolis. "My students come from backgrounds that I couldn't even imagine at their age.

Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement A while back, I was asked, "What engages students?" Sure, I could respond, sharing anecdotes about what I believed to be engaging, but I thought it would be so much better to lob that question to my own eighth graders. The responses I received from all 220 of them seemed to fall under 10 categories, representing reoccuring themes that appeared again and again. So, from the mouths of babes, here are my students' answers to the question: "What engages students?" 1.

Tangrams Here's some puzzling fun for the kids from ancient China! Tangrams, "seven pieces of cleverness", are an ancient Chinese puzzle which is still mind-bending and intriguing today! We've developed some fun printable tangram puzzles which are perfect for kids - they help with logic and thinking skills, dexterity .. and they are just plain puzzling fun! Praise: The good, the bad and the ugly “Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open and the rules are flexible” Virginia Satir Sanctions and praise have always gone hand in hand.

Engagement Vs. Compliance The “Rule of Two Feet” I recently attended a conference that asked attendees to follow the “rule of two feet”. Throughout the conference day, if you found yourself in a session that didn’t apply or interest you, it was fine to pick up and move to another session. The presenter would not be offended, but would realize that the session was not a good match for that particular person. The probing question that came up throughout the day was “If students could utilize the ‘rule of two feet’, would they choose to stay in our classroom, or move on?” Fun Learning Printables for Kids Print the pattern below onto cardstock or construction paper. Print the attached pattern cards, cut and laminate. Have the children use the pattern pieces below to recreate the picture on the pattern card. Pattern Page bat boat

How to Motivate Learning: Alternatives to Rewards One of the first and most important rules of behavior management is that when you take something away, you need to give something back. It's not good enough to say, "Don't" without saying, "Do this instead." Alternatives must be provided for change to occur. Awaken the Learner, Tips Awaken the Learner To effectively prepare learners for success, teachers can emphasize cognitive skills in addition to content in their classrooms. Teaching knowledge has always been an essential component of the American school system, but recent instructional standards have also highlighted the importance of teaching cognitive skills. Cognitive skills, such as generating conclusions, problem solving, experimenting, and decision making, are thinking processes that promote a deeper comprehension of complex ideas. Teachers can directly teach cognitive skills to assist students in challenging, refining, and repurposing their understanding of lesson content.

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