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11 Alternatives to "Round Robin" (and "Popcorn") Reading

11 Alternatives to "Round Robin" (and "Popcorn") Reading
Round Robin Reading (RRR) has been a classroom staple for over 200 years and an activity that over half of K-8 teachers report using in one of its many forms, such as Popcorn Reading. RRR's popularity endures, despite overwhelming criticism that the practice is ineffective for its stated purpose: enhancing fluency, word decoding, and comprehension. Cecile Somme echoes that perspective in Popcorn Reading: The Need to Encourage Reflective Practice: "Popcorn reading is one of the sure-fire ways to get kids who are already hesitant about reading to really hate reading." Facts About Round Robin Reading In RRR, students read orally from a common text, one child after another, while the rest of the class follows along in their copies of the text. Several spinoffs of the technique offer negligible advantages over RRR, if any. Popcorn Reading: A student reads orally for a time, and then calls out "popcorn" before selecting another student in class to read. Why all the harshitude? 1. 2. 4. 5. 6.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/alternatives-to-round-robin-reading-todd-finley

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