background preloader

Teach your students the right way to Google

Teach your students the right way to Google
Kelly Maher November 24th, 2014 In the age of the split-second Google search, it’s more critical than ever to train students to distinguish between primary and secondary sources As in decades past, proper research methods are an essential skill for today’s students. At a time when most students (and adults, for that matter) are accustomed to heading straight to Google to answer all of their questions, being able to sagely sift through the good, the bad, and the ugly of search results is key to creating independent 21st century thinkers. However, even when used properly, Google is not always the right resource. On its website, the Kentucky Virtual Library provides a detailed, student-friendly interactive map of the research process, called “How To Do Research,” which spells out the steps for making the most of the research process, from planning to searching to taking notes and ultimately using gathered information effectively. Learn how to search

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/11/24/google-like-pro-678/

Related:  Integrating Technology across Content AreasGOOGLESearching/Finding Sourcesannefry

Web Literacy: Where the Common Core Meets Common Sense Are you as worried as we are that the overall impact of technology on our children’s ability to solve complex research problems is negative? Have you heard a child near you say, “Just Google it,” when asked to describe the meaning of life? Research shows that students primarily use one search engine and then only look at the first page of results.

How to Search in Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips If you’re like me, you probably use Google many times a day. But chances are, unless you're a technology geek, you probably still use Google in its simplest form. If your current use of Google is limited to typing in a few words and changing your query until you find what you’re looking for, then I’m here to tell you that there’s a better way -- and it’s not hard to learn. On the other hand, even if you are a technology geek and can use Google like the best of them already, I still suggest you bookmark this article of advanced Google search tips. Then, you’ll then have the tips on hand when you're ready to pull your hair out in frustration watching a neophyte repeatedly type in basic queries in a desperate attempt to find something.

The advanced Google searches every student should know Google has amazing tools for finding school-worthy sources. Too bad most kids don’t know they exist “Did he seriously just ask that? How old is this guy?” Well yes, I recently seriously just asked a group of students if they knew how to search Google. And yes, the students got a good laugh from my question. Ways to Evaluate Educational Apps I am conducting a series of workshops in Florida and was asked to share a rubric to help teachers evaluate educational apps as part of the workshop. In 2010 Harry Walker developed a rubric, and I used his rubric (with some modifications by Kathy Schrock) as the basis for mine. (Read Harry Walker's paper Evaluating the Effectiveness of Apps for Mobile Devices.) I kept in mind that some apps are used to practice a discrete skill or present information just one time. Others are creative apps that a learner may use again and again, so it's a challenge to craft a rubric that can be used for a wide span of purposes. I tried to make my rubric work for the broadest range of apps, from drill and practice to creative endeavors, while stressing the purpose for using the app.

Examples of Technology Integration with Young Children Key Messages When used intentionally and appropriately, technology and interactive media are effective tools to support learning and development. Intentional use requires early childhood teachers and administrators to have information and resources regarding the nature of these tools and the implications of their use with children. 5 cool Google Drive features you probably aren't using—yet Google Drive’s austere interface can trick you into thinking what you see is all you get. But it’s actually packed with powerful productivity features that aren’t immediately apparent. And we’ve gone back to uncover even more. Here are five you probably aren’t using, but should be. Drag-and-drop files Normally when you want to upload a file to Google Drive, you go hit the big red New button, select File upload, and then navigate the folders on your computer to grab the file you need.

Research Tips: Primary, secondary and tertiary sources Using Primary, secondary and Tertiary Sources in Research Let’s say you are writing a research paper on the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) of 1972, but you are unfamiliar with it. A good place to gather a general idea or understanding of the ERA would be a tertiary source, such as Wikipedia or the Encyclopedia Brittanica. There, you can read a summary of events on its history, key people involved, and legislation. To find more in-depth analysis on the Equal Rights Amendment, you consult a secondary source: the nonfiction book Why We Lost the ERA by Jane Mansbridge and a newspaper article from the 1970s that discuss and review the legislation.

10 Cool Ways Teachers Use Social Media to Enhance Learning Doing work that matters. All students should be able to be part of that. No longer working for the teacher’s wastebasket, students across the world are connecting and sharing like never before. They are led by teachers unafraid of the world but who escort their kids out to meet the future. Essential Conditions Shared Vision Proactive leadership develops a shared vision for educational technology among all education stakeholders, including teachers and support staff, school and district administrators, teacher educators, students, parents and the community. Empowered Leaders Create a Check In/ Out System in Google Forms There are many uses for Google Forms in classrooms. I’ve used Google Forms to create review quizzes, surveys, and sign-up sheets. This week I discovered a new use for Google Forms.

The Hardest Type of Web Search for Students There are three basic types of searches that students conduct on the Internet. Those types of searches are navigational, transactional, and informational. Navigational searches are conducted to find something specific like a website or physical location. Transactional searches are conducted for the purpose of trying to purchase something. Informational searches are conducted to discover information about a topic.

Related: