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Information design

Information design
Information design is the practice of presenting information in a way that fosters efficient and effective understanding of it. The term has come to be used specifically for graphic design for displaying information effectively, rather than just attractively or for artistic expression. Information design is closely related to the field of data visualization and is often taught as part of graphic design courses.[1] Etymology[edit] The term 'information design' emerged as a multidisciplinary area of study in the 1970s. Some graphic designers started to use the term, and it was consolidated with the publication of the Information Design Journal in 1979, and later with the setting up of the related Information Design Association (IDA) in 1991.[2] In 1982, Edward Tufte produced a book on information design called The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. The term information graphics tends to be used by those primarily concerned with diagramming and display of quantitative information.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_design

Related:  Mind Visual

Visual learning and outlining in the classroom Visual thinking is a learning style where the learner better understands and retains information when ideas, words and concepts are associated with images. Research tells us that the majority of students in a regular classroom need to see information in order to learn it. Some common visual learning strategies include creating graphic organizers, diagramming, mind mapping, outlining and more. Visual learning helps students clarify their thoughts Students see how ideas are connected and realize how information can be grouped and organized. With visual learning, new concepts are more thoroughly and easily understood when they are linked to prior knowledge.

Mashable From navigating the Web in entirely new ways to seeing where in the world twitters are coming from, data visualization tools are changing the way we view content. We found the following 16 apps both visually stunning and delightfully useful. Visualize Your Network with Fidg’tFidg’t is a desktop application that aims to let you visualize your network and its predisposition for different types of things like music and photos. Currently, the service has integrated with Flickr and last.fm, so for example, Fidg’t might show you if your network is attracted or repelled by Coldplay, or if it has a predisposition to taking photos of their weekend partying.

SnakeOil? Scientific evidence for health supplements A generative data-visualisation of all the scientific evidence for popular health supplements by David McCandless and Andy Perkins. I’m a bit of a health nut. Keeping fit. Streamlining my diet. What is information design? - Definition from WhatIs.com Information design is the detailed planning of specific information that is to be provided to a particular audience to meet specific objectives. The information designer may or may not have available (or may create) an information architecture that defines the overall pattern or structure that is imposed on the information design and an information plan that defines information units and how they are to be completed. The output of an information design is sometimes expressed in written instructions, plans, sketches, drawings, or formal specifications.

HAVING FUN WITH NUMBERS AT ÉPOCA Last Updated on Tue, 07 Feb 2012 20:46 Since I started being infographics director at the weekly magazine Época, the flagship of Editora Globo, biggest media group in Brazil, my team and I have produce a reasonable amout of work. I´ve written about some pieces at the official blog of the design and infographics departments, called "Faz Caber!" ("Make it fit!" Course of Actions - Task Flow Mapping Your Day One of the things I’ve found when listing out tasks and actions, is the difficulty of organizing a list into a logical flow. Most of my day is filled with tasks that I need or want to complete in a specific order, and I wanted a simple way to map out the flow of my day. When I set out to find a way to do this, I had several criteria in mind: It had to be simple – I didn’t want a lot of options or stuff to fill in.

infographics Infographics News, a somewhat new BlogSpot blog, has a short list from Ninian Carter of some great infographics of the last year. Ninian Carter is an scottish infographic journalist, well, the Phineas Fogg of the infographic journalists: he has worked in Scotland, England, France, Australia… and his last job was in Canada, at The Globe & Mail, place he left recently. So, as the A Team, he is avalaible for works… (if you click on his name, opening the post, you’ll go to his personal web). Data Driven Architecture One of the largest resources we have today is data. We have information on almost every measurable subject. But what do we do with it? This project explores how data can directly influence architectural form. The results of this exploration into data driven architecture is that of an automated system that based on its location, users, and surrounding data can produce an efficient and performative building.

John Benjamins Publishing Company Information Design Journal (IDJ) is a peer-reviewed international journal that bridges the gap between research and practice in information design. IDJ is a platform for discussing and improving the design, usability, and overall effectiveness of ‘content put into form’ — of verbal and visual messages shaped to meet the needs of particular audiences. IDJ offers a forum for sharing ideas about the verbal, visual, and typographic design of print and online documents, multimedia presentations, illustrations, signage, interfaces, maps, quantitative displays, websites, and new media. 10 Things You Can Learn From the New York Times’ Data Visualizations The Malofiej 20 awards, known as the Pulitzers of the infographics world, recognize the finest infographics published across the globe. This year, more than 1,500 print and online submissions competed for the prestigious awards. National Geographic Magazine, which won best print map and two gold awards, and Internet Group do Brasil iG (gold) were notable achievements. However, as in previous years, the portfolio of graphics from the New York Times dominated the event, winning six gold medals (four print, two online), the best online map and both the ‘Best in Show’ awards for print and online submissions. So what are the secrets to the New York Times’ continued success?

Mind map This article is about the diagram. For the geographical concept, see Mental mapping. Hand-drawn and computer-drawn variations of a mind map. A mind map is a diagram used to visually organize information. CiteWiz: a tool for the visualization of scientific citation networks - Microsoft Academic Search CiteWiz: a tool for the visualization of scientific citation networks ( Citations: 13 ) We present CiteWiz, an extensible framework for visualization of scientific citation networks. The system is based on a taxonomy of citation database usage for researchers, and provides a timeline visualization for overviews and an influence visualization for detailed views.

50 Great Examples of Data Visualization Wrapping your brain around data online can be challenging, especially when dealing with huge volumes of information. And trying to find related content can also be difficult, depending on what data you’re looking for. But data visualizations can make all of that much easier, allowing you to see the concepts that you’re learning about in a more interesting, and often more useful manner.

The Question All Smart Visualizations Should Ask - Michael Schrage by Michael Schrage | 1:00 PM March 26, 2013 “A picture is worth a thousand words” may be a lovely cliché, but it’s exactly the wrong way to view visualization. As admirable as the craft, message, and data-driven artistry of the Edward Tuftes and Stephen Fews may be, successful visualization is less about effectively conveying complex information than creatively provoking human interaction. Infographics should (quite literally) be seen more as interfaces to interpersonal engagement than aesthetically pleasing packages of numbers and analytics. The essential question smart “visualization” and “visualizers” should address is not, “What’s the best and most accessible way of presenting the data?”

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