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10 Ways to Use Technology to Build Vocabulary

10 Ways to Use Technology to Build Vocabulary
Click the "References" link above to hide these references. Adesope, O.O., Lavin, T., Thompson, T., & Ungerleider, C. (2010). A systematic review and meta-analysis of the cognitive correlates of bilingualism. Review of Educational Research, 80(2), 207-245. doi:10.3102/0034654310368803 Baumann, J.F., & Kame'enui, E.J. (Eds.). (2004). Beck, I.L., McKeown, M.G., & Kucan, L. (2008). Berne, J.I., & Blachowicz, C.L.Z. (2008). Biancarosa, G., & Snow, C.E. (2006). Biemiller, A., & Boote, C. (2006). Blachowicz, C.L.Z., & Obrochta, C. (2005). Boulware-Gooden, R., Carreker, S., Thornhill, A., & Joshi, R.M. (2007). Chall, J.S., & Jacobs, V.A. (2003). Cunningham, A.E., & Stanovich, K.E. (2001). Dalton, B., & Proctor, C.P. (2007). Dalton, B., Proctor, C.P., Snow, C.E., Uccelli, P., & Mo, E. (2008, September). Dodge, B. (1995). Elkind, K., & Elkind, J. (2007). Fadel, C., & Lemke, C. (2008). Fang, Z., Schleppegrell, M.J., & Cox, B.E. (2006). Graves, M.F., & Watts-Taffe, S. (2008). Hartman, D.K. (1992).

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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 5 Great Tools to Improve Students Reading Comprehension Skills September 27, 2014 One of the key concerns I often hear primary teachers vociferate revolves around the potential of technology in enhancing students reading comprehension skills. As a matter of fact, technology's role in this regard is phenomenal and there are now several web tools and mobile apps that are designed specifically for the improvement of students reading skills. These tools make use of a variety of activities and exercises all of which are geared towards providing students with meaningful practice in areas related to reading comprehension. Here are some of the key tools I would recommend to use with your kids and students to improve their reading comprehension skills.

9 Word Cloud Generators That Aren't Wordle The use of word clouds in the classroom is a powerful way to really get through to visual learners. The details about the following nine word cloud generators will give you a fair idea how, as an educator, you can get the best out of them. A quick note: Wordle is quite easily the most popular word cloud generator out there. It’s free and easy to use. It does require Java though so Chrome users might have some trouble. 5 Tech Tools to Aid Your Reading Comprehension Words are like teenagers. They are manageable individually, but once they start hanging out with each other, it can be difficult to figure out how they work as a whole. Any parent or teacher who has taught a child to read will tell you that interpreting a text involves two steps. The first step involves decoding and defining individual words. The second (and more important) step is being able to understand what those words mean when they are grouped together as sentences and paragraphs. Reading comprehension can certainly be difficult for kids with learning disabilities and differences, such as dyslexia, but there are plenty of students who struggle with novels and textbook chapters that are written at comprehension levels higher than their own.

21 Digital Tools to Build Vocabulary l Dr. Kimberly's Literacy Blog If you follow this blog, you know that I believe effective vocabulary instruction is just about the most important instructional activity for teachers to get right. For lots of reasons. Vocabulary influences fluency, comprehension, and student achievement. How’s that for starters?

Creating social phrasebooks with Phraseum I spend a lot of time looking at different web-based tools and apps and thinking about if and how they can be used for learning. Sometimes it takes some thought and at other times it’s really obvious. With Phraseum it was instantly obvious that this was a really great tool for learning. Phraseum allows you to collect words, phrases and sentences from anywhere on the web while you you browse and organise them into social phrasebooks. Phraseum is a browser-based tool which can be activated from your browser toolbar. WebCorp: The Web as Corpus WebCorp Live lets you access the Web as a corpus - a large collection of texts from which examples of real language use can be extracted. More... Have you tried WebCorp LSE?

Extensive reading: why it is good for our students… and for us. What is Extensive Reading (ER)?Extensive Reading is often referred to but it is worth checking on what it actually involves. Richard Day has provided a list of key characteristics of ER (Day 2002). This is complemented by Philip Prowse (2002). Maley (2008) deals with ER comprehensively. The following is a digest of the two lists of factors or principles for successful ER:

Self-Study English Grammar Quizzes HTML-Only Quizzes Grammar | Places | Vocabulary | Idioms | Homonyms | Scrambled Words | Misc. Activities for ESL Students has over 1,000 activities to help you study English as a Second Language. This project of The Internet TESL Journal has contributions by many teachers.

Reading for Pleasure Stephen Krashen explains why we should stop scolding teenagers and their schools Contrary to popular opinion, there is no evidence that teenagers are less engaged in literacy activities today than teenagers of the past. Teenagers today do just as much book reading as teenagers did 65 years ago, and it appears that they are more involved in reading and writing in general when we include computer use in the analysis. The true problem in literacy is not related to convincing reluctant teenagers to read: It is providing access to books for those living in poverty.

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