background preloader

Folksonomy

Folksonomy
An empirical analysis of the complex dynamics of tagging systems, published in 2007,[8] has shown that consensus around stable distributions and shared vocabularies does emerge, even in the absence of a central controlled vocabulary. For content to be searchable, it should be categorized and grouped. While this was believed to require commonly agreed on sets of content describing tags (much like keywords of a journal article), recent research has found that, in large folksonomies, common structures also emerge on the level of categorizations.[9] Accordingly, it is possible to devise mathematical models of collaborative tagging that allow for translating from personal tag vocabularies (personomies) to the vocabulary shared by most users.[10] Origin[edit] Folksonomy is a type of collaborative tagging system in which the classification of data is done by users. Folksonomies consist of three basic entities: users, tags, and resource. There are two different groups of folksonomies.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folksonomy

Related:  Curate Content Research

vanderwal.net This page is a static permanent web document. It has been written to provide a place to cite the coinage of folksonomy. This is response the request from many in the academic community to document the circumstances and date of the creation of the term folksonomy. The definition at creation is also part of this document. This document pulls together bits of conversations and ideas I wrote regarding folksonomy on listserves, e-mail, in my blogs and in blog comments on other's sites in 2004. Background

Taxonomy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Taxonomy may refer to: Science[edit] In business and economics[edit] In education[edit] Bloom's taxonomy, a standardized categorization of learning objectives in an educational contextClassification of Instructional Programs, a taxonomy of academic disciplines at institutions of higher education in the United StatesSOLO Taxonomy, Structure of Observed Learning Outcome, proposed by Biggs and Collis Knowledge tags Tagging was popularized by websites associated with Web 2.0 and is an important feature of many Web 2.0 services. It is now also part of some desktop software. A Description of the Equator and Some Otherlands, collaborative hypercinema portal, produced by documenta X, 1997. User upload page associating user contributed media with the term Tag. Online and Internet databases and early websites deployed them as a way for publishers to help users find content. In 1997, the collaborative portal "A Description of the Equator and Some Other Lands" produced by documenta X, Germany, coined the folksonomic term Tag for its co-authors and guest authors on its Upload page.

Tags & Folksonomies - What are they, and why should you care? Tags, or folksonomies are actually a lot simpler than much of the acedemic debate surrounding them. Put simply, they are a user defined method for organizing data. Im going to try to explain what they are, why they are important to marketers and web devs and suggest some ways you might use them. Follow the title link above for the full post. First, Some Examples of Tags in Action There are only a few good, working examples of tagging in operation right now.

Social bookmarking Delicious homepage in October 2012, an example of a social bookmarking website. Common features[edit] In a social bookmarking system, users save links to web pages that they want to remember and/or share. Simple Knowledge Organization System History[edit] DESIRE II project (1997–2000)[edit] The most direct ancestor to SKOS was the RDF Thesaurus work undertaken in the second phase of the EU DESIRE project [1][citation needed]. Motivated by the need to improve the user interface and usability of multi-service browsing and searching,[2] a basic RDF vocabulary for Thesauri was produced. As noted later in the SWAD-Europe workplan, the DESIRE work was adopted and further developed in the SOSIG and LIMBER projects. Folksonomies - Cooperative Classification and Communication Through Shared Metadata The Creation of Metadata: Professionals, Content Creators, Users Metadata is often characterized as “data about data.” Metadata is information, often highly structured, about documents, books, articles, photographs, or other items that is designed to support specific functions. These functions are usually to facilitate some organization and access of information.

vanderwal.net This page is a static permanent web document. It has been written to provide a place to cite the coinage of folksonomy. This is response the request from many in the academic community to document the circumstances and date of the creation of the term folksonomy. The definition at creation is also part of this document. This document pulls together bits of conversations and ideas I wrote regarding folksonomy on listserves, e-mail, in my blogs and in blog comments on other's sites in 2004.

Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online Encouraging Critical Thinking Online is a set of free teaching resources designed to develop students' analytic abilities, using the Web as source material. Two units are currently available, each consisting of a series of exercises for classroom or seminar use. Students are invited to explore the Web and find a number of sites which address the selected topic, and then, in a teacher-led group discussion, to share and discuss their findings. The exercises are designed so that they may be used either consecutively to form a short course, or individually.

The complex dynamics of collaborative tagging The debate within the Web community over the optimal means by which to organize information often pits formalized classifications against distributed collaborative tagging systems. A number of questions remain unanswered, however, regarding the nature of collaborative tagging systems including whether coherent categorization schemes can emerge from unsupervised tagging by users. This paper uses data from the social bookmarking site delicio. us to examine the dynamics of collaborative tagging systems. In particular, we examine whether the distribution of the frequency of use of tags for "popular" sites with a long history (many tags and many users) can be described by a power law distribution, often characteristic of what are considered complex systems.

How to Build a Content Marketing Machine Content Marketing is hot. White hot. SEO and digital marketing thought leaders are declaring that Content Marketing is the next big thing. Even Rand is touting its importance. The strategy of Content Marketing makes sense: instead of pushing messages about your product at prospects, pull prospects towards you by publishing content about your prospects’ interests. Search rank, traffic, leads and all sort of goodness flow from this approach. Visualizing Del.icio.us Roundup I have been coming across many del.icio.us tools to visualize usage during my daily researching hours. So many, that I have decided to start making note of the ones I come across. From the span of about two weeks, I have been collecting as many as I could find. I will list each one along with a description.

The Accidental Taxonomist: Taxonomy Trends and Future What are the trends in taxonomies, and where is the field going? The future of taxonomies turned out to be a unifying theme of last week’s annual Taxonomy Boot Camp conference, in Washington, DC, the premier event in taxonomies, from its opening keynote to its closing panel. “From Cataloguer to Designer” was the title of the opening keynote, an excellent presentation by consultant Patrick Lambe of Straits Knowledge. He said that there are new opportunities for taxonomists, especially in the technology space, if they change their mindset and their role from that of cataloguers, who describe the world as it is, to that of designers, who plan things as they could be.

Categories, Links, and Tags Ontology is Overrated: Categories, Links, and Tags This piece is based on two talks I gave in the spring of 2005 -- one at the O'Reilly ETech conference in March, entitled "Ontology Is Overrated", and one at the IMCExpo in April entitled "Folksonomies & Tags: The rise of user-developed classification." The written version is a heavily edited concatenation of those two talks. Today I want to talk about categorization, and I want to convince you that a lot of what we think we know about categorization is wrong. In particular, I want to convince you that many of the ways we're attempting to apply categorization to the electronic world are actually a bad fit, because we've adopted habits of mind that are left over from earlier strategies. I also want to convince you that what we're seeing when we see the Web is actually a radical break with previous categorization strategies, rather than an extension of them.

Related: