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How to Make a Worm Compost System: 10 Steps

How to Make a Worm Compost System: 10 Steps
Steps Part 1 of 3: Making a Home for Your Worms 1Obtain a worm bin. The worm bin is basically the home for the worms, and the place where they digest the organic material you will give them. Worm bins can be purchased from many online vendors, or from your local gardening or farm supply store. Ad 2If you don't want to buy a worm bin, you can also build one on your own. 4Place the worm bin in a cool area to protect it from excessive heat. Part 2 of 3: Building Your Ecosystem 1Prepare the bedding for your worms. 2Choose which worms you want. Part 3 of 3: Maintaining and Harvesting Your Compost 1Feed your worms digestible amounts regularly. 4Harvest the compost once it's ready. We could really use your help! Can you tell us abouthome construction? home construction how to install a vinyl fence Can you tell us aboutClub Penguin? Club Penguin how to tip the iceberg on Club Penguin Can you tell us aboutdogs? dogs how to train a dog Can you tell us aboutmoney? money how to make money with affiliate programs

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Related:  GardeningSoils, Compost, Terra Preta and BiocharCompost

100 years ago, people were eating things that most of us will never taste. So what happened? Narrator: In 1905, a book called The Apples of New York appeared. It featured hundreds of Apples with names like Westfield Seek-No-Further or Esopus Spitzenburg, a favorite of Thomas Jefferson. If it wasn't for preservationists for like Ron Joyner in Lansing, North Carolina‎, most apples including the Virginia Greening, an apple dating back to the 1700 with thick green skin and yellow, coarse, and sweet flesh would no longer exist. It isn't just apples. In the last, century nearly 75% of our agricultural crops had disappeared. They're simply gone.

Biochar Biochar created through the pyrolysis process. History[edit] Left - a nutrient-poor oxisol; right - an oxisol transformed into fertile terra preta using biochar Composting for Serious Gardeners With more than forty years of experience redefining gardening's boundaries, author Will Bonsall shows how readers can eliminate the use of off-farm inputs like fertilizers, minerals, and animal manures by practicing a purely veganic, or plant-based, agriculture-not for strictly moral or philosophical reasons, but because it is more ecologically efficient and makes good business sense. In Will Bonsall’s Essential Guide to Radical, Self-Reliant Gardening, (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2015) he offers readers in-depth information on growing, harvesting, and processing an incredibly diverse variety of food crops. The following excerpt is from Chapter 1, “Composting as if it Mattered.” You can purchase this book from the MOTHER EARTH NEWS STORE: Will Bonsall’s Essential Guide to Radical Self-Reliant Gardening. I make compost and lots of it, and not just because it’s something hippie homesteaders are expected to do, but because I get a kick out of doing it.

10 Incredible Uses for Epsom Salt in the Garden Love gardening? Then you’ll love our brand new Kindle book: 605 Secrets For A Beautiful, Bountiful Organic Garden: Insider Secrets From A Gardening Superstar. Epsom salt is comprised of hydrated magnesium sulfate, a naturally occurring mineral first found in the well waters of Epsom, England. Epsom salt has a variety of home remedy applications – the two most widely known being as a saline laxative and pain reliever. What many people don’t realize is that Epsom salt also has several uses in organic gardening.

3 Composting Techniques Everyone Should Know We all know by now that composting is important to the environment. It allows natural waste to return to the earth, while adding a nutrient rich material to our gardens. Here is a break down of the top 3 most common techniques for composting for the home gardener. Hot Composting – Open Bins Hot composting is the most intensive method, but also the fastest way to get finished compost. It involves building compost piles that have a balance of green material (nitrogen), oxygen, water and brown material. Are Coffee Grounds Good For Plants? You only need to walk past a coffee shop in any American city to see that our country loves java. With so much coffee being consumed on a daily basis, it’s encouraging to learn that there is a productive use for all those grinds. Next time you make a cup, save your coffee grounds and add them to the soil in your garden. For best results, use organic coffee if you will be consuming the fruits or vegetables you fertilize. In case you didn’t know, approximately 60% of the worlds coffee beans are sprayed with potentially harmful pesticides.

How To Compost Like A Boss If you are a newbie to composting and struggle to wrap your head around exactly how to make a compost pile, then here’s a ‘how to’ graphic that shows you how to compost. When I first started a compost pile I completely botched the greens/browns ratio, resulting in a pile that took over a year to compost. It is my hope that this visual guide helps your first compost pile turn into a success, so that you can start successfully increasing the fertility of your garden soils. Click On The Graphic To Enlarge Feel free to share on your site by copy and pasting the code below: <p align="center"><a href=" alt="How To Compost" src=" /></a></p><p align="center">How To Compost Brought To You By: <a href="

22 trees that can be tapped for sap and syrup As winter wanes and spring approaches, wild foodists all across North America tap into the time-honored tradition of sugar production – mainly, the transformation of maple tree sap into maple syrup and sugar. This process, passed on from the Native Americans to the early settlers, is still quite popular today, and is responsible for one of the few wild foods that can be purchased commercially in most supermarkets. Most people associate syrup with the maple tree, and although much of today’s syrup does originate from the sugar maple, all species of maple can be tapped. Even better, many other trees from other genera can be tapped to extract sap, which ultimately can be turned into delicious syrup. In this post, I won’t be discussing the methods involved in tapping for sugar production. If you are unfamiliar with the process, there are a variety of great websites, videos, and books to guide you.

DIY Spinning Composter This year was my first year for a full-fledged garden. I consider it full-fledged because it produced enough to not only feed Biceps and I, but it also allowed me to dehydrate, freeze and give-away the excess. To be honest, I was just happy that anything sprouted from the earth. Recycling animal and human dung is the key to sustainable farming © Illustrations in red & black: Diego Marmolejo for low-tech magazine. The innocent looking water closet breaks up a natural cycle in our food supply. Basically, it turns extremely valuable resources into waste products. When we grow crops, we withdraw essential nutrients from the soil: potassium, nitrogen and phosphate, to name but the most important.

Composting 101 for citydwellers As Tom Philpott wrote in the introductory essay to Grist’s Feeding the City series, urban agriculture took a huge hit once combustible-fuel machines replaced horses — and horse manure — as the vehicle of choice in cities. Farms need fertilizer, and it’s more efficient to grow where the sources of it live and poop. However, every day city dwellers throw away huge amounts of organic matter that could be turned into that precious material — through composting. Yard trimmings and food scraps make up 26 percent of U.S. waste, and once this organic matter hits the landfill, it breaks down slowly due to lack of air: your farmers-market tomato can produce methane, a deadly greenhouse gas, in a not-so-green afterlife. If you’re going to all the trouble to eat locally grown, organic vegetables, it’s rather a shame to truck their remains away to landfill prison when you could be feeding them back to the earth. So why aren’t you composting yet?

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