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10 Job Skills You’ll Need in 2020

10 Job Skills You’ll Need in 2020
The world of work—and the world in general—is changing. People are living longer, new technologies are emerging, and we’ve never been more globally connected. That means the skills we use now in the workplace are not necessarily the skills we’ll need in the future. To get a sense of what skills you might want to start investing your time into developing, check out the infographic below. (Note: It might sound like 2020 is really far into the future, but it’s actually only about five years away.) Infographic courtesy of Top10OnlineColleges.org.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/10-job-skills-youll-need-in-2020

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The Future of Work: Quantified Employees, Pop-Up Workplaces, And More Telepresence For many people, especially those working at desk jobs, the workplace is very different than it was 20 years ago: there’s a computer at every desk, telecommuting is fairly common, and the traditional cubicle is giving way to more collaborative spaces. We’ve seen predictions about where we’ll go from here before; now PSFK, a popular blog that also happens to be a thriving consultancy, has come up with its own version of the future of work, described in a new 138-page report. It’s not as fantastical as many future-forward reports--it’s planted firmly in ideas that are already gaining a lot of traction. Perhaps that makes it more accurate. Unesco. 50th anniversary of Nubia Campaign UNESCO, Egypt and Sudan have started commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Nubia Campaign, a defining example of international solidarity when countries understood the universal nature of heritage and the universal importance of its conservation. The Egyptian and Sudanese governments' request - in April and October 1959 respectively - for UNESCO's help to save the 3,000-year-old monuments and temples of ancient Nubia from an area that was to be flooded by the Aswan Dam marked the start of unprecedented campaign. "A moving demonstration of the miracles that can be achieved by international cooperation," in the words of the Director-General of UNESCO, Koïchiro Matsuura who sent a message to the participants of a meeting held in Egypt to commemorate the Nubia Campaign. "Saving the temples and artefacts of Nubia became an urgent priority transcending national interests and pride, and, as we all know, the international community brilliantly rose to that challenge.

The Invisible Economy Our techniques for measuring economic performance are obsolete, obscuring a complete picture of how we're faring. Reuters Our techniques for measuring economic performance are obsolete. So we reach improper conclusions about the state of the economy. The economic recovery is probably more robust than we realize. It is possible that the standard of living for many members of the middle class is improving while their incomes shrink.

Webster's Visual Dictionary A dictionary with a new point of view that catches the eye and enriches the mind. 20,000 terms with contextual definitions,developed by terminology experts; 6,000 full-color images of a wide variety of objects from all aspects of life; One essential reference. The Visual Dictionary is designed to help you find the right word at a glance. 10 well paid jobs of the future Mr Bellini posited the idea of an elderly well-being consultant, who specialises in personalised care for older patients, or a memory augmentation surgeon who helps counter memory loss. He also saw big changes in farming as food resources became scarce, with genetically modified crops becoming common and crops grown vertically in areas resembling multi-storey car parks to save space. Ian Pearson, a futurologist who wrote You Tomorrow, sees job growth in the field of augmented reality, where the real world is overlaid with computer-generated images. “When you look at a building it’s constrained by planning laws, but in cyberspace you can make it look however you want,” he said.

Future of Work: What Skills Will Help Us Keep Pace? From Elon Musk’s tweet that artificial intelligence may be more dangerous than nuclear weapons to the growing clamor of voices warning robots will take away our jobs, it is clear we are focusing more on the problems of AI, robotics, and automation than the solutions. While the problems are real and should be taken into account, social innovators around the world are already working to deliver solutions. It’s true that today’s technology is reworking the economy and our role in it. But this needn’t herald economic end times.

The Networked Economy promises to transform just about every aspect of how people live and work. No question about it: The Networked Economy is the next economic revolution. In the coming years, it will offer unprecedented opportunities for businesses and improve the lives of billions worldwide. In fact, the revolution is already under way. “Over the last few decades, we’ve grown beyond the industrial economy to the IT economy and the Internet economy, each of which led to significant inflection points in growth and prosperity,” says Vivek Bapat, SAP’s global vice president for portfolio and strategic marketing. “Now we’re looking at the Networked Economy.” This new economy, resulting from a convergence of the economies that came before it and catalyzed by a new era of hyperconnectivity, is creating spectacular new opportunities for innovation.

The 10 Most Asked Questions About Genius Hour and 20% Time Projects – A.J. JULIANI How do I get started? Lucky for you there is many teachers who have already jumped into Genius Hour and 20% Time Projects. Even luckier is that they have shared their experiences online, in books, in interviews, webinars, and in courses. I offer teachers a free four-part mini-course on Genius Hour and 20% Time (you can check it out there). I’m also teaching an online course this upcoming Fall Semester for the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education.

Garbage designer, robot counsellor among the predicted jobs of 2030 About 15 years from now, farmers will have made their way from the countryside to the city, counsellors will help ensure the right robot goes to the right family and garbage designers will lead the upcycling movement. Those are some predictions made by the Canadian Scholarship Trust Plan’s Inspired Minds initiative, which aims to give Canadians a sneak peek of the job market in 2030. Some of the more curious careers include:

If Schools Don't Change, Robots Will Bring On a 'Permanent Underclass': Report Robots are taking all the jobs. But are we, the average, moderately skilled humans, screwed, or aren't we? Let me just get it out of the way now: We are, unless there are drastic, immediate changes to education and economic systems around the world.

7 Predictions For The Future Of Work Everything you thought you knew about the workplace is already outdated. Gone are the days when decisions were made from the top down and when all anyone was expected to do was simply “their job.” As a Corporate Anthropologist, I study the cultures of organizations—how they evolve and intersect with what’s happening right now, and how the people in them influence and shape their communities.

As Robots Grow Smarter, American Workers Struggle to Keep Up A machine that administers sedatives recently began treating patients at a Seattle hospital. At a Silicon Valley hotel, a bellhop robot delivers items to people’s rooms. Last spring, a software algorithm wrote a breaking news article about an earthquake that The Los Angeles Times published. Although fears that technology will displace jobs are at least as old as the Luddites, there are signs that this time may really be different. The technological breakthroughs of recent years — allowing machines to mimic the human mind — are enabling machines to do knowledge jobs and service jobs, in addition to factory and clerical work. And over the same 15-year period that digital technology has inserted itself into nearly every aspect of life, the job market has fallen into a long malaise.

Technology and Interactive Notebooks – Teaching Without a Quill This is 100% inspired by Ditch the Book writer Matt Miller using sketch notes and incorporation of technology. Go check him out if you haven’t already. Now, on to what has worked in my room..

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