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Beautiful Reactions

Beautiful Reactions
Precipitation Chemical Garden Color Change Metal Displacement Crystallization Bubbling Dancing Fluorescent Droplets Smoke Reactions cannot be performed without chemical apparatus. Apparatus Used by Priestley Apparatus Used by Lavoisier

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The Colours & Chemistry of pH Indicators Most of us, chemists or otherwise, have probably come across pH indicators at one point or another. I’d be surprised if there’s anyone out there who hasn’t, back in school, carried out the standard experiment of adding universal indicator to a variety of household liquids to identify them as acidic or alkaline. You might not be aware of the large range of different indicators that can be used to identify varying pHs, however, or the reasons behind the colour changes observed. Firstly, it might seem a little odd that different indicators are even required, considering that universal indicator gives us a broad range of colours across the pH scale. However, universal indicator gives us a range of gradual colour changes, across a range of pH, rather than clearer ones at more specific pH ranges.

Downloads DownloadsCompound Interest2015-04-27T22:25:39+00:00 This page contains links to downloads of the high resolution PDFs of infographics on the site. You will need unarchiving software to extract the files once they have downloaded. If you would prefer to simply view the different graphics, you can do this from the infographics page, the link to which is in the sidebar. Elements | Food Chemistry | Colourful Chemistry | Organic Chemistry | Download Element Infographics Chemical Reactions Posters – Part I Click to enlarge Recently, some of my classes have been revising types of chemical reactions, which inevitably set me thinking about how to represent them visually in an easy to understand way. These are the first few posters I’ve come up with – each has a large icon representative of the reaction type, as well as a short description of the reaction, and an example.

‘Poisonous’ Poinsettia pH Indicators I’m making pH indicator paper with some of my classes this week, using the coloured leaves of red poinsettia plants, which set me thinking about the chemistry behind why these plants can be used as indicators. Poinsettias have a reputation for being poisonous – a claim that is in fact entirely unfounded. A quick google search will reveal that the myth of poisonous poinsettias potentially originates from a ingestion of poinsettia leaves being mistakenly attributed as the cause of poisoning of an american child in 1919. Not being poisonous obviously isn’t quite the same as being edible, and eating poinsettia leaves can potentially cause stomach pain and vomiting – but there have been no recorded deaths as a result of the plant. As its leaves also have a reportedly ‘indescribably awful’ taste, few could probably bear more than a nibble.

Atoms and Molecules There are 114 different kinds of elements that form everything living and nonliving in the world. Although scientists might discover a few new elements in the future, they are probably very unstable and can only exist in the lab. We use chemical symbols to identify elements. Chemical Reactions Posters – Part II Click to enlarge Here’s the second part of the Chemical Reactions posters, this time featuring condensation, hydrolysis, displacement, oxidation, and reduction reactions. Click the image above to enlarge and read the text, or, as previously, I’ve included the text separately in the post below. Print-friendly versions are again available to download at the foot of the page. Condensation Reactions:

Chemistry 1102: Indicators and the pH Scale Instructions Before viewing an episode, download and print the note-taking guides, worksheets, and lab data sheets for that episode, keeping the printed sheets in order by page number. During the lesson, watch and listen for instructions to take notes, pause the video, complete an assignment, and record lab data. See your classroom teacher for specific instructions. Moseley Articles Sept 2012 - This file does not show Greek letters because the HTML has not yet been updated. It will be soon! By H. Chemistry 1103: Neutralization Reactions Instructions Before viewing an episode, download and print the note-taking guides, worksheets, and lab data sheets for that episode, keeping the printed sheets in order by page number. During the lesson, watch and listen for instructions to take notes, pause the video, complete an assignment, and record lab data. See your classroom teacher for specific instructions. Note Taking Guide

Acid/Base Basics For instance, 30 mL of 1.00 M NaOH is needed to titrate 60 mL of an HCl solution. The concentration of HCl needs to be determined. At the eqivalence point: To solve for the molarity of HCl, plug in the given data into the equation above. The concentration of HCl is 0.5 M. Sample Problems Chemistry 605: Types of Reactions and Predicting Products Instructions Before viewing an episode, download and print the note-taking guides, worksheets, and lab data sheets for that episode, keeping the printed sheets in order by page number. During the lesson, watch and listen for instructions to take notes, pause the video, complete an assignment, and record lab data. See your classroom teacher for specific instructions. Note Taking Guide

A Colorful Magic Trick with Acids and Bases - Video What the Heck is an Acid or Base? (Acid-Base Made Easy) Ever wondered what the heck an Acid or Base actually is? Were you ever super confused in high school or college chemistry? I've got a nice surprise for you guys in this video series. It's a little different than my usual videos, and I hope you all like the new direction I'm trying to take my videos.

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