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25 Anchor Charts for Teaching Writing

25 Anchor Charts for Teaching Writing
Anchor charts are a great way to make thinking visible as you record strategies, processes, cues, guidelines and other content during the learning process. Here are 25 of our favorite charts for teaching your students all about writing. The Why Behind Writers Workshops Source: The First Grade Parade First and second graders will draw inspiration from this fun-filled anchor chart about why we write. Make this chart applicable to older students by expanding on each aspect with a specific audience or goal. "To share experiences" can become "to share experiences with friends, in a postcard or with readers in a memoir." Setting Goals Source: second-grade writing-goals chart sets goals around important writing skills for younger students: punctuation, and vocabulary. Source: Juice Boxes and CrayolasIt's the icing on the cake! Looking for more?

http://www.weareteachers.com/blogs/post/2014/09/08/25-awesome-anchor-charts-for-teaching-writing

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T-Chart To view our printable materials, you must download the latest version of the free Adobe Acrobat software. Download now Our lesson plans are written and reviewed by educators using current research and the best instructional practices and are aligned to state and national standards. Teaching With a Mountain View: Anchor Chart Tips & Tricks It's no secret that I have a "thing" for anchor charts. My readers know it, my students know it, my colleagues know it, my husband knows it... I can't help it--they have changed my classroom! They have made my walls interactive instead of stagnant. I just LOVE anchor charts.

Repurposing March Madness Every March, millions of people come down with a very strange illness…Bracket Fever. I know people who haven’t seen a college basketball game in 10 years who still religiously fill out a bracket and sweat out the scores and results. It has become larger than just a basketball tournament; it has become a cultural phenomenon.

Word Study Routine and Tips~Words their Way Recently, I have received lots of interest in my Words Their Way Word Searches and questions about my word study routine. If you are unfamiliar with Words Their Way, check out the foundational text by the same name. To see an example of the developmental spelling inventory, check out this tutorial from Pearsontraining. In the past few years, I have tried different things, but worked to simplify the process of having too many groups, word lists, and activities for students to complete. I have also worked to find routine activities that remind students of the purpose of word study~that the spelling learning should transfer into our actual writing!

Create SWOT Analysis Diagrams Gliffy's online SWOT analysis tools and templates are a simple, organized way to approach complex goal-setting. Map your goals Internally, you have Strengths and Weaknesses (SW—). Reader's Workshop This website is designed and maintained by Karen A. McDavid © 2004. Ideas, content, activities, and documents for this website are copyrighted by Karen A. McDavid and should not be copied or downloaded without permission. All graphics seen throughout this website should not be removed, copied, or downloaded. You may download the banner below with a link back to this site.

Independent Reading: 101 What is Independent Reading, Really? Independent reading is any time carved out of your day in which your students are reading self-selected books that are a "good fit" for them. There are different kinds of reading that may be going on in your room during this time and it will look different from classroom to classroom.The focus of this time is to support, encourage and validate your students as they grow as readers, through all of their ages and stages. The main components of independent reading are outlined below. When do I find the Time? Independent Reading is an indispensable part of the day in a literacy rich classroom. Fourth Grade Math 4th Grade Math First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade

4 Reasons to Start Class With a Poem Each Day For each school day of the past three years, I've started my ninth-grade English class with a poem. When I first made this commitment, I feared that I might not have the stamina (or enough engaging poems) to sustain us for the full 184 days of class. And I wasn't the only skeptic. Each year, I get a few sideways glances and furrowed brows when I explain our daily opening routine for class.

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