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Forgotten Nations

Forgotten Nations
History Rome annihilated Carthage to ensure it would never again rise as a major threat. The Ottomans forever ended Byzantium’s glory. The vast armies of Persia were repeatedly beaten back by the Greeks, subjugated by the might of Alexander, and destroyed by the rise of Islam. The fates of once great and proud nations fill the pages of history books—and then there are those forgotten powers even the history books seldom mention. 10BurgundyWestern Europe France’s greatest historical rivals are often considered to be England or Germany. We’ve previously mentioned how Louis the Pious, son of Charlemagne, divided the Carolingian Empire among his sons. For a time, it seemed that fortune favored Burgundy. 9NovgorodEastern Europe The city of Novgorod, whose residents sometimes called it “Lord Novgorod the Great,” truly lived up to its name. By the 14th century, Novgorod had become one of the busiest trading ports in Europe—an estimated 400,000 people lived in the city. 6MajapahitSoutheast Asia

http://listverse.com/2014/09/07/10-forgotten-nations-that-once-ruled-the-land/

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KateMonk This is a collection of names from around the world which was initially intended to help provide character names for live role-players. It includes short historical backgrounds, male and female first names or personal names, and surnames or family names, from many countries and periods. The author is not an expert in onomastics or history so would like to apologise if any mistakes have been made. All names included are from genuine sources to the best of her knowledge, but this is not an academic study and should not be relied upon by re-enactment societies which require specific dates and instances of occurrence for the names they use. 11 Things You May Not Know About Ancient Egypt — HISTORY Lists Ancient Egypt stood as one of the world’s most advanced civilizations for nearly 3,000 years and created a culture so rich that it has spawned its own field of study. But while Egyptian art, architecture and burial methods have become enduring objects of fascination, there is still a lot you probably don’t know about these famed builders of the pyramids. From the earliest recorded peace treaty to ancient board games, find out 11 surprising facts about the Gift of the Nile. Along with King Tut, perhaps no figure is more famously associated with ancient Egypt than Cleopatra VII. But while she was born in Alexandria, Cleopatra was actually part of a long line of Greek Macedonians originally descended from Ptolemy I, one of Alexander the Great’s most trusted lieutenants.

Home of the Book Genome Project We haven't turned on user accounts yet, which will allow you to save preferences, bookshelves, and have customized suggestions as the tools learn more about your particular tastes. If you'd like us to let you know when we roll out user accounts, enter your e-mail address below, and we'll keep you posted. Today's uniquely unique title: What BookLamp Does: BookLamp.org is the home of the Book Genome Project. 10 Ways We're All Picturing The Ancient World Incorrectly Thanks to countless books, movies, and trashy TV shows, most of us have a fairly firm mental image of the ancient world. Togas, feasting, gladiatorial combat . . . the standard stuff. Yet step back in time, and you’d be confronted with a world that confounded your expectations. Far from being a close approximation of the truth, our collective mental image of the ancient world may be nothing like reality at all. 10Ancient Britain Had African Citizens Although London is one of the most multicultural cities on Earth, it’s only been in the last century or so that minorities have become a familiar sight in Britain.

Iran Through Ages (726 BC to 640 AD) Ancient Iran through Ages (728BCE to CE651) Medes / Median (Mâdhâ) Dynasty; 728-550BCE Achaemenid (Hakhâmaneshiyân) Dynasty; 550-330BCE Parthian /Arsacid (Ashkâniân) Dynasty; 247BCE-CE224 Sasanid / Sasanian (Sâsâniân) Dynasty; CE224-640 Modern Iran What Vikings really looked like The fine decoration of the Oseberg ship in Norway, which was buried in the year 834, provides clues to what Vikings looked like. Inside the ship were two women and the archaeologists believe the ship has served as a sarcophagus. (Photo: Annie Dalbéra) There’s no shortage of myths about the appearance of our notorious Viking ancestors. To find out more about these myths, ScienceNordic’s Danish partner site, videnskab.dk, asked its Facebook readers to list their favourite myths about what the Vikings looked like.

Europe by bike – in 1933 Evening spent in Ostend has cheered me up completely. We have found most aristocratic digs with lift which only charges 25 francs for b & b – a marked contrast to a café on the Promenade, where they rushed [charged] us 8d for a ham sandwich! Ostend (Photo: Getty) MAP: Imperial Russia By the middle of the 19th century, the Russian Empire comprised more than 15 percent of the Earth’s land mass spanning parts of three continents, Europe, Asia, and North America. The population of the empire included not only Russians, but also Ukrainians, Belarusians, Finns, Poles, Armenians, Azerbaijanis, Tatars, Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Germans, and many other ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups. Russians were proud of the empire and used various means to celebrate its scale and diversity. Presented here are two sets of cards, circa 1800-33 and 1856, in which each card corresponds to a particular province or other administrative subdivision of the empire. Each card contains the map and coat of arms of the province and provides additional information about geographic features, cities, people, and local costumes.

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire by Timothy B. Lee on August 19, 2014 Two thousand years ago, on August 19, 14 AD, Caesar Augustus died. A Year on the Medieval Farm What did medieval peasants do on a farm? Some documents from the period offer insights into the agricultural activities throughout the year. One of these works was the Liber ruralium commodorum, written by Pietro de’ Crescenzi around 1304-09. This treatise about agriculture offered advice on all kinds of things to be done on the medieval farm, ranging from beekeeping to winemaking, and includes a chapter detailing a monthly calendar of tasks. 20 Extremely Romantic Quotes You Should Say To Your Love Get ready for some serious swooning. These are some of the most romantic lines we have ever read in YA lit. Have one to add? Share it with us in the comments below!

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