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Open_Education_Resources_Evaluation_Rubric-1.docx

Open_Education_Resources_Evaluation_Rubric-1.docx

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8htrN_MakT9SHJmUjc3TFVzaEk/edit?pli=1

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Improving student assessment The issue Effective assessment has greater bearing on successful learning than almost any other factor. Increasing student numbers are adding to marking workloads for staff and students express more dissatisfaction with assessment and feedback than with any other aspect of their learning experience, according to the National Student Survey (2011). Evaluate OER - Open Educational Resources (OER) - LibGuides at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Here are a few steps you might take in the evaluation process. If this process seems lengthy, think about the process you follow to review textbooks and other materials for your course. You can use a similar or modified evaluation process. Does this OER cover the content you'd like your students to learn in this course or module? How accessible is this content?

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Filed by the ACRL Board on February 2, 2015. Adopted by the ACRL Board, January 11, 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. PDF Version Print copies may be purchased from the Association of College and Research Libraries for $15.00 for a package of 10, including standard postage. Expedited shipping is available for an additional charge.

Case studies in social bookmarking - Empowering learners with social bookmarking Introducing social bookmarking with students Anne talks about the process for her and students to work out what new tools can provide and then how they can enrich the learning experience. Allowing ‘set up’ time initially to help students to familiarise with the tools is an important part of this process. <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="applets/audio.swf?file=applets/abartlett_t1.mp3" width="270" height="46"><param name="movie" value="applets/audio.swf?file=applets/abartlett_t1.mp3"><param name="quality" value="high"><p>You do not have the Flash plugin. BC Open Textbooks Review Criteria Comprehensiveness – The text covers all areas and ideas of the subject appropriately and provides an effective index and/or glossary.Content Accuracy – Content, including diagrams and other supplementary material, is accurate, error-free and unbiased.Relevance/Longevity – Content is up-to-date, but not in a way that will quickly make the text obsolete within a short period of time. The text is written and/or arranged in such a way that necessary updates will be relatively easy and straightforward to implement.Clarity – The text is written in lucid, accessible prose, and provides adequate context for any jargon/technical terminology used.Consistency – The text is internally consistent in terms of terminology and framework.Modularity – The text is easily and readily divisible into smaller reading sections that can be assigned at different points within the course (i.e., enormous blocks of text without subheadings should be avoided).

Taking the Learners and Technology Outdoors I began my career as an educator as an outdoor educator. Now I teach educational technology. Given both the ever increasing sedentary and indoor lives of kids and the advancement of technology, the time is ripe to combine the two. SOC 101 – Intro to Sociology Sociology is the study of social groups, structures, processes, institutions, and events. This course will focus on understanding and applying the sociological perspective, which stresses the importance of the impact of social forces external to the individual in shaping people’s lives and experiences. This idea that we are all profoundly affected by the society in which we live is the guiding light of sociology. Sociologists also study the ways in which people, as they interact, shape their social systems. Topics studied will include socialization, social interaction, culture, groups, social structure, deviance, social inequality, social class, race, gender, institutions (political, economic, educational, family, and religious), collective behavior and social change.

Teaching Using Google Glass and Apps Creating a platform to enable the fluid and continuous exchange of ideas and information. Can the use of devices such as Glass add pedagogical value (Video 1)? As a wearable computer, the Glass screen can be used to provide an educator with key or supplemental information during a talk, lecture, or discussion. It is also being used by instructors to demonstrate specific skills, interview experts, and allow students to view distant sites (such as CERN in Switzerland – a feature temporarily suspended due to poor user experience). Examples of these uses and more can be found on forums such as Google Glass in Education.

Connect OER What is Connect OER? Connect OER is a platform to share and discover information about OER activities at campuses across North America. Each participating institution maintains a profile page about local OER activities, which collectively populate a searchable directory that showcases trends, best practices, and collective impact being achieved through OER. Connect OER has three main components: Campus Profiles: Each participating institution has a campus profile maintained by its academic library, which includes a summary of OER activities and basic metrics about the status of OER on campus. This profile can be updated and expanded over time as initiatives progress.

Studies of e-portfolio implementation (videos and toolkit) Two online resources providing guidance on large-scale implementation of e-portfolio tools in UK further and higher education are available to supplement the 2008 JISC publication, Effective Practice with e-Portfolios The online resources, five video case-studies and an online toolkit for managers and practitioners, explore the issues, challenges and benefits of scaling up e-portfolio use across a university or college, and offer opportunities to explore the pros and cons of different approaches and methodologies. The e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit The e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit1 is the output from the JISC-funded e-Portfolio Implementation (ePI) study2 led by the University of Nottingham.

eLearning Learning Online @ BTC Flexible Learning Options Bellingham Technical College supports the success of its students by providing flexible learning opportunities. Online courses are 100% available on the web. The Methods and Means to grading Student Participation in Online Discussions This is the final post in a three-part series on how to create effective discussions in an online environment in the context of courses for credit. In this post I’ll share how to grade and asses students contributions in online discussion forums – the final yet essential step that solidifies and reinforces student learning. I am eager to share my insight into the measurement component of online discussions, as we found within our own institution’s online program that it was the assessment aspect, through the use of a rubric was the critical element that raised the bar for our threaded discussions. The rubric allowed course instructors to give ‘good’ feedback to students, clarified for students what was expected of them in discussions and to the astonishment of some of our professors, it [the rubric] improved the quality and quantity of discussion postings significantly. How much is the discussion/contribution component worth in the overall grading scheme of an online class? Like this:

Using Rubrics to Grade Online Discussions - ELC Support A rubric is a scoring scale used to evaluate a student's work. Rubrics spell out to students exactly what is expected of them, and they list the criteria instructors use to assess students' work. Rubrics also help instructors by providing guidelines for more objective grading. The Value of Rubrics Rubrics are useful for assessing work in any classroom setting, but they are especially helpful in online courses, where all information must be clearly stated in course documents. In some courses, instructors use rubrics for each assignment.

Critical thinking in the Online Classroom This is part 3 in a 3 part series discussing the concept of ‘presence’ in online learning communities. I’ve been writing about online presence in this series and though complex, it is best understood by the Community of Inquiry (CoI) model, a framework of three dimensions that work together to create what I call a complete learning experience (though the creators of the model call it an ‘educational experience’ where all three coincide (Garrison et al., 2000). In part one, I reviewed instructor presence and part two, social presence. Though this third dimension is officially labeled ‘cognitive presence‘ I have made reference to critical thinking, as this is what should be happening in the cognitive presence domain, which I’ll elaborate on further in the post.

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