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Structuring Collaboration for Student Success (Keys to PBL Series Part 3)

Structuring Collaboration for Student Success (Keys to PBL Series Part 3)
Peggy: The teacher doesn’t just throw control to the students and say, "Let me know what you figure out." She really has to plan ahead of time, she has to figure out how to group the students so that they're the most productive. She has to scaffold their work, so she provides hints or clues or templates, worksheets is necessary, to kinda show them what they need to do first, what they might consider doing next. She has to teach them how to work together. Teamwork is not something that comes naturally, especially for younger students. They really need to learn how to do that. Sheela: So we would have a anchor or a set of expectations about what kind of language would be used, what the roles and responsibilities are for each person in that group. Student: So you start with one trail mix and give out stickers. Student: I do the sticker charge thing. Student: Oh, that makes sense. Teacher: So what's this lake potentially used for? Sheela: So it's really the art of facilitation.

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12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. COMICS IN THE CLASSROOM: How one Wissahickon teacher uses comic books to connect with his students - Ambler Gazette By Dutch Godshalkdgodshalk@21st-centurymedia.com@DutchGodshalk on Twitter Wissahickon High School social studies teacher Tim Smyth uses comic books in his class lessons. BOB RAINES -- DIGITAL FIRST MEDIA LOWER GWYNEDD >> A few years ago, Wissahickon High School social studies teacher Tim Smyth, a by-the-book AP instructor who had earned himself a reputation among students for being “very challenging,” did something unexpected. He started handing out comic books in his classes — lots of comic books.

Embedding Assessment Throughout the Project (Keys to PBL Series Part 5) Peggy: Different than a traditional classroom, PBL's gonna integrate assessment throughout the project. Because these projects are multi-week projects, you need to keep on top of students and build in opportunities to assess where they are and what they're learning as you go along. Sheela: From the minute a teacher introduces that learning target for the lesson, or engages in strategic observation, we feel that the assessment process is in play. Liza: It's not a test at the end of the week or the end of the unit.

Facilitating Learning in a Student-Driven Environment (Keys to PBL Series Part 4) Liza: So when you're working on projects and you really have student-driven lessons, it can be scary because you don't feel like you're in control, but you really are. If you are planning the right way ahead of time, you are scaffolding every single aspect of that lesson and what the students are doing. You may say to yourself, it's way too much, there's too much to do. But that hard work in the beginning allows it to be completely student-driven and they know that this is their education and that I'm here to support them. I'm not here to tell them what they need to know. Teacher: What else can we use the lake for besides drinking and fishing?

8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom What Is Problem-Based Learning? by TeachThought Staff What is problem-based learning? One definition, if we want to start simple, is learning that is based around a problem. That is, the development, analysis, and thinking towards a problem drives student learning forward. Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement A while back, I was asked, "What engages students?" Sure, I could respond, sharing anecdotes about what I believed to be engaging, but I thought it would be so much better to lob that question to my own eighth graders. The responses I received from all 220 of them seemed to fall under 10 categories, representing reoccuring themes that appeared again and again. So, from the mouths of babes, here are my students' answers to the question: "What engages students?" 1.

Building Rigorous Projects That Are Core to Learning (Keys to PBL Series Part 2) Steven: A lot of people think that Project Based Learning is fluff. So what we did, instead of having a three-column rubric that has "Unsatisfactory, Proficient and Advanced," we added a fourth column. It is the "Standards," what has to be taught. Establishing Real-World Connections in Projects (Keys to PBL Series Part 1) Peggy: Usually by starting with an authentic problem in the community, or in the neighborhood, you anchor the unit with a driving question. So students are given this question, for example, "What's in our water? And how did it get there?" And then the students choose different paths to explore that question. Sheela: Start to examine what's happening in your local community.

42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects 42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects by Terry Heick So often, we make learning more complicated than it has to be. Engagement Vs. Compliance The “Rule of Two Feet” I recently attended a conference that asked attendees to follow the “rule of two feet”. Throughout the conference day, if you found yourself in a session that didn’t apply or interest you, it was fine to pick up and move to another session. The presenter would not be offended, but would realize that the session was not a good match for that particular person. The probing question that came up throughout the day was “If students could utilize the ‘rule of two feet’, would they choose to stay in our classroom, or move on?”

Climbing the Project-based Learning Mountain 1. Start at a trail marker. The best way to plan a PBL is to start with one single standard in one subject. I usually plan around Math for my project-based learning activities. Once you come up with a topic that goes with this subject, you will find many other standards that it meets. PBL Gallery Home | Getting Started | Modules | Resources | About Us View the work of teachers who developed and implemented PBL units/mini-units. Feel free to download and use the PBL as a template for your work with students. We appreciate your feedback.

Awaken the Learner, Tips Awaken the Learner To effectively prepare learners for success, teachers can emphasize cognitive skills in addition to content in their classrooms. Teaching knowledge has always been an essential component of the American school system, but recent instructional standards have also highlighted the importance of teaching cognitive skills. Cognitive skills, such as generating conclusions, problem solving, experimenting, and decision making, are thinking processes that promote a deeper comprehension of complex ideas. Teachers can directly teach cognitive skills to assist students in challenging, refining, and repurposing their understanding of lesson content.

Problem-Based Learning or Just Another Project? Use This Checklist to Find Out A few days ago I posted Amy Mayer’s comparison between assigning projects and developing project-based learning in the classroom. Due to its immense popularity, I decided to do some more research on helpful charts for teachers trying to implement PBL in their classrooms, and was thrilled to come across this checklist from the good folks at BIE: This checklist is a fantastic way to ensure that you are on the right track with shifting away from “doing a project” and moving towards project-based learning. Even if you are still at the planning phase, this is a great graphic to get you thinking about the essential elements you should include in your next project-based learning unit! Happy checking, y’all! Like this:

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