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8 Steps To Great Digital Storytelling

8 Steps To Great Digital Storytelling
First appeared on Edudemic. (Updated 3/14/2014) Stories bring us together, encourage us to understand and empathize, and help us to communicate. Long before paper and books were common and affordable, information passed from generation to generation through this oral tradition of storytelling. Consider Digital Storytelling as the 21st Century version of the age-old art of storytelling with a twist: digital tools now make it possible for anyone to create a story and share it with the world. WHY Digital Storytelling? Digital stories push students to become creators of content, rather than just consumers. Movies, created over a century ago, represent the beginning of digital storytelling. 8 Steps to Great Digital Stories Great digital stories: Are personalBegin with the story/scriptAre conciseUse readily-available source materialsInclude universal story elementsInvolve collaboration at a variety of levels 1. All stories begin with an idea, and digital stories are no different. Resources 2. 3.

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Related:  LearningDigital StorytellingDigital Storytelling & eBooksReference/How-To Facts/Stats

Create Script - Digital Storytelling Site (Source: Step 1: Decide on the Story You Want to Tell You probably already have a person or subject in mind. Think small. Digital Storytelling - Projects - South East Grid for Learning This site uses some unobtrusive cookies to store information on your computer. Some cookies on this site are essential, and the site won't work as expected without them. These cookies are set when you submit a form, login or interact with the site by doing something that goes beyond clicking on simple links. We also use some non-essential cookies to anonymously track visitors or enhance your experience of the site.

Digital Native Students are More Consumers than Creators OK, friends– it’s time to get over it. You might call young people “digital native students” but there are severe limits to their ability to turn that geekdom into real learning. The persistent myth of modern digital native students connotes for many that millennial students have a natural fluency with digital tools that previous generations did not. However, studies consistently show that today’s students are much better consumers of content than creators of it, and that this consumer orientation doesn’t translate into empowered learning. How to Watch Blocked Internet Videos « Broken Secrets September 27, 2010 at 5:00 am Chad Upton By Chad Upton | Editor The internet is a great place to catch TV shows and clips that you or your PVR missed. Unfortunately, a lot of websites only allow their video content to be viewed in their service area.

5 Free Tools for Creating Book Trailer Videos The traditional book report that asks students to critique the books that they read is a staple of many classrooms. If you would like to add a new element to book reports try having students add visual and audio components to book reports by having students create book trailers. Book trailers are short videos designed to spark a viewer's interest in a book. A great place to find examples of book trailers is Book Trailers for Readers. If you would like to have your students try to create book trailers, here are five free video tools that are well-suited to that purpose. Animoto makes it possible to quickly create a video using still images, music, video clips, and text.

Databases: Self-Paced How long will the mini-courses be available? All of the mini-courses will be available for an extended period of time. We anticipate the content will be available at least until June 9, 2015. Legal Music For Videos Many musicians choose to release their songs under Creative Commons licenses, which give you the legal right to do things like use their music in your videos. What is Creative Commons? Creative Commons is a system that allows you to legally use “some rights reserved” music, movies, images, and other content — all for free. CC offers free copyright licenses that anyone can use to mark their creative work with the freedoms they want it to carry. For instance, a musician might use a Creative Commons license to allow people to legally share her songs online, make copies for friends, or even use them in videos or make remixes.

Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics for Teachers Are you integrating digital storytelling in your course with your students ? Are you looking for a carefully crafted rubric to help you guide your digital storytelling activities ? Well you don't have to go far, the answers are right below these couple of lines. This is probably the first time I am publishing a rubric on evaluating digital storytelling. CatScan Output from article search CatScan is an external tool that searches an article category (and its subcategories) according to specified criteria to find articles, stubs, images, and categories. It can also be used for finding all articles that belong to two specified categories (the intersection). CatScan is developed by the German wikipedian Duesentrieb and is run on the toolserver, a special machine used for such tools. CatScan (original)CatScan V2.0β (more powerful rewrite)

storyboards What is a storyboard? Once a concept or script is written for a film or animation, the next step is to make a storyboard. A storyboard visually tells the story of an animation panel by panel, kind of like a comic book. Compilers About This Course This course will discuss the major ideas used today in the implementation of programming language compilers, including lexical analysis, parsing, syntax-directed translation, abstract syntax trees, types and type checking, intermediate languages, dataflow analysis, program optimization, code generation, and runtime systems. As a result, you will learn how a program written in a high-level language designed for humans is systematically translated into a program written in low-level assembly more suited to machines. Along the way we will also touch on how programming languages are designed, programming language semantics, and why there are so many different kinds of programming languages. The course lectures will be presented in short videos. To help you master the material, there will be in-lecture questions to answer, quizzes, and two exams: a midterm and a final.

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