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UI, UX: Who Does What? A Designer's Guide To The Tech Industry

UI, UX: Who Does What? A Designer's Guide To The Tech Industry
Design is a rather broad and vague term. When someone says "I'm a designer," it is not immediately clear what they actually do day to day. There are a number of different responsibilities encompassed by the umbrella term designer. Design-related roles exist in a range of areas from industrial design (cars, furniture) to print (magazines, other publications) to tech (websites, mobile apps). With the relatively recent influx of tech companies focused on creating interfaces for screens, many new design roles have emerged. Job titles like UX or UI designer are confusing to the uninitiated and unfamiliar even to designers who come from other industries. Let's attempt to distill what each of these titles really mean within the context of the tech industry. UX Designer (User Experience Designer) UX designers are primarily concerned with how the product feels. "Define interaction models, user task flows, and UI specifications. -Experience Designer job description at Twitter Product Designer

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3032719/ui-ux-who-does-what-a-designers-guide-to-the-tech-industry

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Responsive Logos, Part 1: Tips for Adapting Logos for Small Screens From what I’ve seen, logos typically receive the short end of the stick when it comes to responsive web design practices. Take a look through responsive galleries, and you’ll see that, in most examples, the logo is just shrunk to fit within available space. For rectangular logos with simple and minimal details, this approach can work just fine. But if the composition or proportion of a logo is anything else, simply reducing its size for small screens may make small details unrecognizable, and small type unreadable. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be this way. Style guides and branding guidelines

Wink Squares Off Against Nest In The Battle For "Home" Field Advantage We huddle on a tiny astroturf lawn, waiting for our hosts while a Dropcam Pro aimed at the doorstep monitors our movements. It’s smart home suburbia, shrunk to showroom scale, and we’re here as guests of Wink, a Quirky subsidiary that is the latest entrant in the race to make our homes more responsive, efficient, and secure. Chaz Flexman, Wink general manager, appears at the door and pulls a phone from his jeans pocket. As he guides us through the model connected home, locks open, blinds raise and lower, and lights dim. Wink is betting that consumers want to buy better versions of the home products and appliances they already need, and use their smartphone as the built-in remote control for managing those devices. That strategy stands in contrast to Nest, the smart home hub acquired by Google for $3.2 billion earlier this year.

4 Reasons Why Design Is Taking Over Silicon Valley Are the fortunes of design on the rise in Silicon Valley? A resounding yes, says John Maeda, design partner at the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers. During a presentation at South By Southwest 2015 on Sunday, Maeda argued that not only is Silicon Valley taking design more seriously; design is actually taking over. Here are four key reasons why the most successful tech companies of the future will really be design companies. Moore's Law No Longer Cuts It Top 10 User Experience Design Blogs User experience is an industry that is constantly evolving. Whether you’re a new practitioner or a seasoned veteran it’s important stay up-to-date on the latest conversations and ideas happening in the industry. So how do you stay updated and relevant? Here’s a clue: you’re doing it right now. Reading blogs is a quick and easy way to remain current.

Curating the very best packaging design Budweiser January 27, 2016 | 0 Comments Designed by jkr | Country: United States “People gravitate towards brands that have a unique story to tell, and few have as rich a history as Budweiser. How Crowdsourcing And Machine Learning Will Change The Way We Design Cities In 2011, researchers at the MIT Media Lab debuted Place Pulse, a website that served as a kind of "hot or not" for cities. Given two Google Street View images culled from a select few cities including New York City and Boston, the site asked users to click on the one that seemed safer, more affluent, or more unique. The result was an empirical way to measure urban aesthetics. Now, that data is being used to predict what parts of cities feel the safest. StreetScore, a collaboration between the MIT Media Lab's Macro Connections and Camera Culture groups, uses an algorithm to create a super high-resolution map of urban perceptions. The algorithmically generated data could one day be used to research the connection between urban perception and crime, as well as informing urban design decisions.

Frictionless Design Choices No one wants friction in their products. Everyone works to reduce it. Yet it sneaks in everywhere. We collectively praise a service, app, or design that masterfully reduces friction. We also appreciate minimalism. Top 5 Web Design Skills You Can Learn Online Be honest, you’ve considered becoming a web designer. You’ve always fancied yourself a creative at heart, with an eye for good design. You know that a nice looking website has to maintain a certain balance and flow—a wall of tiny white text on a black background won’t be gaining anyone raving fans anytime soon. Create a Vibrant Abstract Vector Design Illustrator This post was originally published in 2011 The tips and techniques explained may be outdated. Follow this step by step Illustrator tutorial to create a vibrant abstract design. We’ll put Illustrator’s Gradient Mesh tool to use to create a colourful shape, then build up layers of objects to create an abstract design with lots of vibrancy, bright colours and transparency effects. The design we’ll be creating features a range of vibrant and colourful shapes which stack to produce an abstract array of bright and electrifying colours. The design is entirely made of vector elements so it can be scaled to any size you wish, whether it’s an iPhone wallpaper or super sized poster.

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