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American Indians Tribes Map

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Download 91,000 Historic Maps from the Massive David Rumsey Map Collection Three years ago, we highlighted one of the most comprehensive map collections in existence, the David Rumsey Map Collection, then newly moved to Stanford University. The Rumsey Collection, we wrote then, “contains a seemingly inexhaustible supply of cartographic images”—justifiable hyperbole, considering the amount of time it would take any one person to absorb the over 150,000 physical artifacts Rumsey has amassed in one place. By 2016, Rumsey had made almost half the collection—over 67,000 images—freely available in a digital archive that has been growing since 1996. Each entry features high-resolution scans for specialists (you can download them for free) and more manageable image sizes for enthusiasts; a wealth of data about provenance and historical context; and digital, user-friendly tools that use crowd-sourcing to measure the accuracy of antiquated maps against GPS renderings. To make this document even more compelling, it contains its own bibliography. Related Content:

untitled Explore a Tapestry of World Ecosystems The United States Geological Survey has published a new global ecosystems map of unprecedented detail. The map was produced by a team led by Roger Sayre, Ph.D., Senior Scientist for Ecosystems at the USGS Land Change Science Program. It is a mosaic of almost 4,000 unique ecological areas called Ecological Land Units (ELUs) based on four factors that are key in determining the makeup of ecosystems. This Story Map Journal has two main features, an ecosystems browser and an ecosystem tour. In the ecosystem browser, opposite, point and click at any location on the map and the name of that ecosystem appears in a pop-up box. ​The ecosystem tour starts on the next page of this map journal. Click on the map at left to see the Ecological Land Unit at that location. Facebook Twitter Share Tap for details Swipe to explore Tap to go back Swipe to explore • Click on underlined titles below to view thematic maps. Bioclimate: Cold Moist Landform: Low Mountains Rock Type: Basic Plutonics Bioclimate: Hot Wet

Histoire et géographie de l'Europe Cartographies of Time: A Visual History of the Timeline by Maria Popova A chronology of one of our most inescapable metaphors, or what Macbeth has to do with Galileo. I was recently asked to select my all-time favorite books for the lovely Ideal Bookshelf project by The Paris Review’s Thessaly la Force and artist Jane Mount. Despite the near-impossible task of shrinking my boundless bibliophilia to a modest list of dozen or so titles, I was eventually able to do it, and the selection included Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline (public library | IndieBound) by Daniel Rosenberg and Anthony Grafton — among both my 7 favorite books on maps and my 7 favorite books on time, this lavish collection of illustrated timelines traces the history of graphic representations of time in Europe and the United States from 1450 to the present, featuring everything from medieval manuscripts to websites to a chronological board game developed by Mark Twain. The first chapter, Time in Print, begins with a context for these images: Donating = Loving

The First Ecological Land Units Map of the World In December 2014, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and Esri announced the publication of the most detailed global ecological land units map in the world. This exciting global data set provided a science platform for better understanding and accounting of the world’s resources. Scientists, land managers, conservationists, developers, and the public use this map to improve regional, national, and global resource management, planning, and decision making. This map as well as the data layers used to create it can be explored in a story map that introduces ecological land units. How was this map created?

Old-Maps - the online repository of historic maps - UK 40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. A few are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head. If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit. 1. 2. 3. 4. Pangea was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eras, forming about 300 million years ago. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 37. 38. 39. 40. *Bonus* World Map Tattoo with Countries Visited Coloured Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Ancient Earth globe This visualization is created and maintained by Ian Webster. See more of my work at ianww.com or email me at ian@dinosaurpictures.org. Click here to subscribe to occassional email updates when we add something interesting to this visualization such as new dinosaur or plate tectonic data. Plate tectonic and paleogeographic maps by C.R. Scotese, PALEOMAP Project. Some elements of this visualization are not adjusted for time (eg. cloud and star positions).

Res Obscura: The Most Wonderful Map in the World: Urbano Monte's Planisphere of 1587 At some point in 1589, a Milanese cartographer named Urbano Monte made up his mind: his self-portrait needed updating. Monte carefully crouched over the section of his map that bore his self-portrait from two years earlier — close-cropped sandy hair, a trim beard, modest clothes — and pasted a new self-portrait over it. The resulting double self-portrait (Monte at 43, hidden beneath a new portrait of Monte at 45) testifies to the persistence of male pattern baldness throughout human history. It also exemplifies Monte's astonishing attention to detail. The task he had set himself was to map every corner of the known world, not only showing cities, rivers and mountains, but giving warnings about monsters (beware the trickster spirits that lurk in Central Asian deserts) and wondrous beasts like unicorns. If the two years that divide Monte's self-portraits seem to have led to some lost hair and added wrinkles, we can hardly blame him. And here it is in a more familiar projection:

Model Military International earth :: глобальная карта ветров, погодных условий и морских течений 200° @ 20 km/h Дата ✕ year History in Motion Glencoe Models

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