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2013

2013
Communicating Digital Humanities Across and Beyond the Disciplines Editor: Julianne Nyhan Front Matter It is time to address the Public Communication of DHJulianne Nyhan, UCL This introduction addresses two facets of the communication of Digital Humanities (DH) that have framed this special edition of DHQ. I begin by discussing a number of articles about DH that have relatively recently appeared in mainstream newspapers. Articles Digital Humanities in the 21st Century: Digital Material as a Driving Force Niels Brügger, The Centre for Internet Studies, and NetLab Aarhus University In this article it is argued that one of the major transformative factors of the humanities at the beginning of the 21st century is the shift from analogue to digital source material, and that this shift will affect the humanities in a variety of ways. Towards a Rationale of Audio-TextTanya E. Digital Humanities provide the means and methods to research topics in a transdisciplinary and multilayered way. Articles

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Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies - DECIMA: The Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive, and the Project for a Geo-Spatial and Sensory Digital Map of Renaissance Florence Find using OpenURL DECIMA: The Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive, and the Project for a Geo-Spatial and Sensory Digital Map of Renaissance Florence In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: A project at the University of Toronto, with funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC), is developing a mapping tool that will allow for the spatial organization of early modern historical, cultural, and sensory materials. Called the Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive (DECIMA), it uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software to map, house by house, a 1561-62 Florentine tax census onto one of the best city maps produced in the sixteenth century.

Digital Studies / Le champ numérique Digital Studies / Le champ numérique (ISSN 1918-3666) is a refereed academic journal serving as a formal arena for scholarly activity and as an academic resource for researchers in the digital humanities. DS/CN is published by the Société canadienne des humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN), a partner in the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organisations (ADHO). Digital Studies / Le champ numérique is a Gold Open Access refereed journal. Articles published with DS/CN are compliant with most national and institutional Open Access mandates including the Research Council UK (RCUK) Open Access Mandate (required by the HEFC for the post-2014 REF) and the Canadian Draft Tri-Agency Open Access Policy.

CDRH Articles and Resources Recommendations for Digital Humanities Projects The Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (CDRH) recommends that digital research projects be based on international standards. Standards-based projects stand a greater chance of interoperating with similar sites, and are more likely to migrate successfully into new computing environments as file formats and standards change. Examples of standard practices may include use of: Extensible Markup Language (XML) for encoding content; the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) as an application of XML for encoding textual content; adoption of non-proprietary data file formats; XQuery-based searches of XML content; and the use of open-source database and web publishing frameworks. A common early phase of digital research may involve building a Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) prototype to serve as an illustration or proof of concept. XML is an internationally adopted encoding standard that describes data.

Visualizing Historical Networks MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO USE GEPHIThose new to Gephi might consider reviewing the online tutorials. These provide a brief introduction to the program's capabilities. Information about importing geographic coordinate data can be found here. Our own data is available on .csv files and can be imported to Gephi for use in your own explorations. Instructions on importing can be found here.

DH Resource Guide From CUNY Academic Commons Welcome to the CUNY Digital Humanities Resource Guide, a collaboratively produced introduction to the field of Digital Humanities. The guide is a project of the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI), a new working group aimed at building connections and community among those at CUNY who are – or would like to be – applying digital technologies to research and pedagogy in the humanities. Introduction Dtm-Vic / Lebart Last modified on 08/19/2013 11:42:16 Software DtmVic: Exploratory statistical processing of complex data sets comprising both numerical and textual data. Applications concern primarily the processing of responses to open ended questions in socio-economic sample surveys. - Special emphasis on: Complementary use of visualization techniques (Principal Component Analysis, Two-way and Multiple Correspondence Analysis) and clustering techniques (hybrid method using both hierarchical clustering and k-means technique; Self Organizing Maps (SOM). Assessments of visualization techniques: resampling techniques (bootstrap, partial bootstrap, total bootstrap, bootstrapping variables).

National Jukebox LOC.gov WARNING: Historical recordings may contain offensive language. Read the disclaimer Now Playing... Elk's reunion march Le parlate d'amor El teléfono a larga distancia At the jazz band ball Everybody's jazzin' it Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and smile, smile, smile! View This Playlist 1919 Victrola Book of the Opera What is the Spatial Turn? · Spatial Humanities What is a turn? Humanities scholars speak of a quantitative turn in history in the 1960s, a linguistic and cultural turn of the 1980s in history and literature, and even more recently an animal turn. Beyond the academy, to turn implies retrospection, a process of stopping in the road and glancing backwards at the way by which one has come. May the weary traveler turn from life's dusty road and in the wayside shade, out of this clear, cool fountain drink, and rest “Landscape turns” and “spatial turns” are referred to throughout the academic disciplines, often with reference to GIS and the neogeography revolution that puts mapping within the grasp of every high-school student.

JDH» Getting Started in Digital Humanities Lisa Spiro When I presented at the Great Lakes College Association’s New Directions workshop on digital humanities (DH) in October, I tried to answer the question “Why digital humanities?” But I discovered that an equally important question is “How do you do digital humanities?” z:perseus-annis [Klafil] Nouns in nominative Here is how I searched for nouns in nominative. case="nominative" & POS="noun" & #1 _=_ #2 Videos Creative Commons Kiwi This short and fun animation video by Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand explains the CC licenses. A Shared Culture A high-level overview of the goals of Creative Commons and how we are “saving the world from failed sharing.” About the History Data Service About the History Data Service The History Data Service (HDS) collects, preserves, and promotes the use of digital resources, which result from or support historical research, learning and teaching. The History Data Service is a successor service to AHDS History which from 1996 to March 2008 was one of the five centres of the Arts and Humanities Data Service. The service is housed within the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex. The service provides access and support for a range of historical datasets, promoting and facilitating increased and more effective use of data in research, learning and teaching. Services offered by the History Data Service include:

What Digital Humanists Do “The digital humanities is what digital humanists do.” — Rafael Alvarado, Day of DH (reprinted in “Day of DH: Defining the Digital Humanities” in Debates in the Digital Humanities) Alvarado's point — that the field of digital humanities is varied and dynamic — is an excellent one. However, I want to supplement it by clarifying what some of those specific things are. The format of this post is shaped by (and owes a lot to) Miriam Posner's excellent “How did they make that?”, which really helped me when I was wrestling with the organization of what I wanted to say. This post is meant as a precursor/companion to Miriam's, because after teaching the DMDH workshops last year, I think that an even more basic introduction to some of the major DH activities can be helpful, especially for people who are a step before getting started — and figuring out whether getting started is something that they want to do.

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