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WHEN WORKS PASS INTO THE PUBLIC DOMAIN

WHEN WORKS PASS INTO THE PUBLIC DOMAIN
By Lolly Gasaway University of North Carolina Definition: A public domain work is a creative work that is not protected by copyright and which may be freely used by everyone. The reasons that the work is not protected include: (1) the term of copyright for the work has expired; (2) the author failed to satisfy statutoryformalities to perfect the copyright or (3) the work is a work of the U.S. Government. 1 Term of joint works is measured by life of the longest-lived author. 2 Works for hire, anonymous and pseudonymous works also have this term. 17 U.S.C. § 302(c). 3 Under the 1909 Act, works published without notice went into the public domain upon publication. Works published without notice between 1-1-78 and 3-1-89, effective date of the Berne Convention Implementation Act, retained copyright only if efforts to correct the accidental omission of notice was made within five years, such as by placing notice on unsold copies. 17 U.S.C. § 405.

http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm

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PowerUp Game Story If any one out there is listening, Planet Helios is being destroyed and we need your help! Hundreds of years ago the nations of our planet realized that the side effects from burning fossil fuels for energy were damaging the atmosphere and changing the climate. They joined together to develop and build technologies to create electricity from available renewable energy resources like wind, sun and water power. Meanwhile the planet's citizens–our ancestors– pulled together and pledged to use less energy. This ushered in a Golden Age of energy balance and ecological harmony. s Copyright and Fair Use Resources This is a tool that explains everything you need to know about copyright, and then some! Learn what copyright is and is not, what it protects, what Public Domain is, what the difference is between Copyright and Plagiarism, and a LOT more. Do you remember what the acronym DMCA stands for?

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Tools for the TEKS: Integrating Technology in the Classroom "Do I have to get permission to use this?" "Is this legal?" "If it doesn't have the copyright symbol on it, is it still copyrighted?" National 4-H Curriculum New Curriculum: What's On Your Plate?: Exploring Food Science The latest National 4-H Curriculum title examines food science with a collection of hands-on experiments-you-can-eat.

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