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Writing Genres

Writing Genres
As students prepare to write, they need to think about the purpose of their writing: Are they writing to entertain? to inform? to persuade? Setting the purpose for writing is just as important as setting the purpose for reading, because purpose influences decisions students make about form. One of the most important considerations is the genre or form the writing will take: a story? © ______ 2010, Allyn & Bacon, an imprint of Pearson Education Inc. Related:  English - Misc

Duke University | Thompson Writing Program: Genres of Writing Skip Navigation Duke University. Durham, NC 27708 | Contact Search or Browse all of Duke University Duke Thompson Writing Program Genres We use the term genres to describe categories of written texts that have recognizable patterns, syntax, techniques, and/or conventions. Thompson Writing Program Box 90025, Durham, NC 27708 Phone: (919) 660-4368 Fax: (919) 681-0637 Contact the Thompson Writing Program Contact the TWP Writing Studio

Welcome to English Grammar Express 6 Online Tools That Will Help The Writing Process Writing can be a difficult task for many students. Some have trouble getting started, others have trouble staying on task, and many struggle with both. Staying focused when you’re sitting at your computer and somewhat uninspired can be a disaster waiting to happen – there’s a lot of stuff to waste time with on The Interwebs! The Internet can be a huge distraction, but it can also be the tool that helps to make you a more efficient and better writer. In fact, there are many online tools you can start using today and start getting the work done more quickly, efficiently, and effectively. Citelighter Citelighter is a great way to build your bibliography simply – so you don’t spend all of your time worrying about correctly formatting a bibliography in APA, MLA, or Chicago formatting. Write Monkey Write Monkey helps to make the writing process cleaner by providing the user with a distraction free writing environment, and by streamlining keyboard and mouse use . Focus Writer Omm Writer WriteRoom

Literary Genre | Categorizing Texts | Ereading Worksheets The study of genre is not an exact science. Some texts may belong in more than one genre. For example: Romeo and Juliet is a drama, a tragedy, and an Elizabethan play. The idea of genre is open to discussion and there is good reason to discuss genre. Understanding genre will help you know what to expect from a text based on its genre; it will also help you notice when an author is playing with your expectations. Main Genres and Subgenres Some consider these to be the main genres of writing: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and folklore. Fiction: stories that come from the author’s imagination. Genre Worksheets Genre Worksheet – Read the descriptions of the texts. Genre Worksheet 2 – Choose the genre and subgenre in which the story most likely belongs. Genre Worksheet 3 – Read descriptions of texts written for a variety of purposes and then determine the genre and subgenre based on the provided details. Identifying Genre Worksheet – Read the titles and descriptions of the stories.

Storyboard That: The World's Best FREE Online Storyboard Creator Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask- question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful- dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Beautiful - pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling Begin - start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate Brave - courageous, fearless, dauntless, intrepid, plucky, daring, heroic, valorous, audacious, bold, gallant, valiant, doughty, mettlesome

Genre Map, Literary Map Publishers, booksellers, and readers describe books by their literary categories, or genres. It's how books are placed in stores and sold online. We created the Genre Map to help you find the right genre for your book. Roll over the map with your cursor to see the different genres. Some categories, such as women's fiction, stand alone. If you select mystery, fantasy, romance, science fiction, or thriller, you'll see the many subgenres that you can explore within these categories. Please contact us if there's a category you'd like to see on the Genre Map.

Powerful Tools for Teaching and Learning: Digital Storytelling About the Course Powerful Tools for Teaching and Learning: Digital Storytelling introduces educators to digital storytelling and explores ways to use digital stories to enhance students’ learning experience. The course is designed to be comprehensive yet fundamental. By comprehensive we mean that the course provides a solid foundation to all of the components of a digital story and illustrates these components with tutorials, example stories and links to additional readings. The course also provides a hands-on opportunity for learners to create their own digital stories. The course is fundamental because it covers the basic process of creating a digital story starting with just a simple script and as little as one still image. Course Syllabus Over the course of five weeks, we will cover the following topics: Week 1: Choosing a topic and purpose Week 1 introduces you to the basics of digital storytelling. Recommended Background The course is primarily intended for: In-course Textbooks

Scientific Writing Course Home OVERVIEW: The way to well-written science How to do the Course PART I: Paragraphs and Sentences SET A: Paragraphs: The Maps Behind Them SET B: Paragraphs: Using Maps to Meet Readers' Expectations SET C: Paragraphs with Something Extra: Points and Tails SET D: The Generic Section: Expectations and Maps as Blueprints SET E: Scientific Sections: The Methods and Results SET F: Scientific Sections: The Discussion SET G : Scientific Sections: The Introduction SET H : Sentences SET I : The Paper as a Whole PART II: The Paper and its Sections Introduction SET 1: Argument Parts SET 2: Indicator Words SET 3: Refining Claims SET 4: Locating Arguments in Prose SET 5: Rationale's Essay Planner SET 6: Evidence in Arguments: Basis Boxes SET 7: Assessing SET 8: More on Assessing SET 9: Analysis Maps SET 10: Assessing Again Synthesis 1: Position-Early Paragraphs Synthesis 2: Position-Final Paragraphs Synthesis 3: Writing a Discussion I Synthesis 4: Writing a Discussion II Why is it like this? About The Developer

A Medieval Christmas Whilst the term “Christmas” first became part of the English language in the 11th century as an amalgamation of the Old English expression “Christes Maesse”, meaning “Festival of Christ”, the influences for this winter celebration pre-date this time significantly. Winter festivals have been a popular fixture of many cultures throughout the centuries. A celebration in expectation of better weather and longer days as spring approached, coupled with more time to actually celebrate and take stock of the year because there was less agricultural work to be completed in the winter months, has made this time of year a popular party season for centuries. Whilst mostly synonymous with Christians as the holiday commemorating the birth of Jesus (the central figure of Christianity), celebrating on the 25th December was a tradition that was borrowed, rather than invented, by the Christian faith and is still celebrated by Christians and non-Christians alike today. Christmas or Xmas? Carol singers.

Welcome to AzarGrammar.com Write Well Watch Video Why Google Translate Doesn't Translate Posted: August 25, 2015 in Writing Fundamentals Instructor: Watch Video Editing Sentences Using the Paramedic Method Posted: August 24, 2015 in Writing Fundamentals Instructor: Dr. Britt Abel Watch Video The Secret Code of Citing Sources Posted: August 24, 2015 in Writing Fundamentals Instructor: Ginny Heinrich Watch Video What's In a Prompt? Posted: August 24, 2015 in Writing Fundamentals Instructor: Dr. Britt Abel Watch Video Why Write Well? Posted: June 16, 2015 in Writing Fundamentals Instructor: Stephen Smith Watch Video Topic Sentences Posted: February 10, 2015 in Writing Fundamentals Instructor: Dr. Brian Lush Watch Video How do I get there?

Culture - The language rules we know – but don’t know we know Over the weekend, I happened to go viral. Or rather a single paragraph from a book I wrote called The Elements of Eloquence went viral. The guilty paragraph went like this: “Adjectives in English absolutely have to be in this order: opinion-size-age-shape-colour-origin-material-purpose Noun. English speakers love to learn this sort of thing for two reasons. Actually, there are a couple of small exceptions. Ding dong King Kong Well, in fact, the Big Bad Wolf is just obeying another great linguistic law that every native English speaker knows, but doesn’t know that they know. If somebody said ‘zag-zig’ or ‘cross-criss’ you would know they were breaking a rule You are utterly familiar with the rule of ablaut reduplication. All four of a horse’s feet make exactly the same sound. Reduplication in linguistics is when you repeat a word, sometimes with an altered consonant (lovey-dovey, fuddy-duddy, nitty-gritty), and sometimes with an altered vowel: bish-bash-bosh, ding-dang-dong.

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