background preloader

Interactive map: Loss of Indian land

Interactive map: Loss of Indian land
The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations. (Above is a GIF of the map's time-lapse display; visit the map's page to play with its features.) The project’s source data is a set of maps produced in 1899 by the Bureau of American Ethnology. While the time-lapse function is the most visually impressive aspect of this interactive, the “source map” option (available on the map's site) offers a deep level of detail. This vagueness benefited the government’s purposes in crafting treaties and executive orders.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vault/2014/06/17/interactive_map_loss_of_indian_land.html

Related:  bagsclubFirst North AmericansEtats-Unis

Control Alt Achieve: Hipster Google - 21 Google Tools You Probably Never Heard Of Google is well know for certain tools and services - Search, Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Docs, Slides, Sheets, Maps, Chrome, and such. These are all powerful and useful tools that are transforming teaching and learning in schools around the world. However, in addition to those tools, Google has also created a wide range of services, apps, extensions, features, and other tools that are not as well known. Even though these tools may not be as popular or as widely known, they are still very useful in school settings. These are the "Hipster Google" tools.

Ancient Siberian genome reveals genetic origins of Native Americans The genome sequence of a 24,000-year-old Siberian individual has provided a key piece of the puzzle in the quest for Native American origins. The ancient Siberian demonstrates genomic signatures that are basal to present-day western Eurasians and close to modern Native Americans. This surprising finding has great consequences for our understanding of how and from where ancestral Native Americans descended, and also of the genetic landscape of Eurasia 24,000 years ago. The breakthrough is reported in this week's Nature (Advance Online Publication) by an international team of scientists, led by the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark (University of Copenhagen). The search for Native American ancestors has been focused in northeastern Eurasia. In late 2009, researchers sampled at the Hermitage Museum, St.

'Battle Lines' Is A Civil-War Comic Hollywood Can Learn From When people think of comics they typically think of bite-sized chunks, which is one of the reasons why the medium has long been viewed as unserious and juvenile. Neither the daily strip nor the monthly superhero story has enough heft to provide deep insights into life, the universe, or anything. It's no coincidence that the works that have won mainstream acceptance, like the initially serialized Maus and Watchmen, work as longform graphic novels that can hold their own on a bookshelf next to more weighty tomes like Moby Dick or Ulysses. Big themes and big stories, conventional wisdom goes, require big works.

DNA Analysis Shows Native American Genealogy The suppression of the Native Americans and the decimation of their culture is a black page in the history of the United States. The discrimination and injustices towards this ancient race, which had lived on the American continent long before the European conquerors came to this land, are still present to this day despite the efforts of different groups and organizations trying to restore the justice. The destruction of their culture is one of the most shameful aspects of our history, the extent of the damage that was done is still being down-played and denied entry into textbooks and history-lessons to this day. The origin and history of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas have been studied for years by researchers from different countries, and a recent DNA study showed that the genealogy of the western aboriginals is one of the most unique in the world. This explanation was persuasive enough; however, there was no strong evidence to support it.

Obama Reckons With a Trump Presidency The morning after Donald Trump was elected President of the United States, Barack Obama summoned staff members to the Oval Office. Some were fairly junior and had never been in the room before. They were sombre, hollowed out, some fighting tears, humiliated by the defeat, fearful of autocracy’s moving vans pulling up to the door. Although Obama and his people admit that the election results caught them completely by surprise—“We had no plan for this,” one told me—the President sought to be reassuring. 10 Best Interactive Timeline Makers – 5 Free and 5 Paid Need to find an interactive timeline maker to help you organize information into a linear structure? Timelines are linear organizers that help students to understand and illustrate the passage of large blocks of time. While the obvious application would be in a history class, teachers and educators from all disciplines and in all levels of education can benefit from teaching with timelines.

9 Examples of Indigenous Sense in a Nonsensical Time By Rucha Chitnis / buzzfeed.com Sometimes it seems like we live in nonsensical times. Do you ever wonder what happened to good old common sense? Native American populations descend from three key migrations, scientists say Scientists have found that Native American populations -- from Canada to the southern tip of Chile -- arose from at least three migrations, with the majority descended entirely from a single group of First American migrants that crossed over through Beringia, a land bridge between Asia and America that existed during the ice ages, more than 15,000 years ago. By studying variations in Native American DNA sequences, the international team found that while most of the Native American populations arose from the first migration, two subsequent migrations also made important genetic contributions. The paper is published in the journal Nature July 11. "For years it has been contentious whether the settlement of the Americas occurred by means of a single or multiple migrations from Siberia," said Professor Andres Ruiz-Linares (UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment), who coordinated the study. "But our research settles this debate: Native Americans do not stem from a single migration.

Related: