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Louis Wain

Louis Wain at his drawing table[1] Louis Wain (5 August 1860 – 4 July 1939) was an English artist best known for his drawings, which consistently featured anthropomorphised large-eyed cats and kittens. In his later years he may have suffered from schizophrenia (although this claim is disputed), which, according to some psychiatrists, can be seen in his works. Life and work[edit] A naturalistic cat from early in Wain's career. Louis William Wain was born on 5 August 1860 in Clerkenwell in London. Wain was born with a cleft lip and the doctor gave his parents the orders that he should not be sent to school or taught until he was ten years old. An early Louis Wain caricature, featuring bulldogs rather than cats. Wain soon quit his teaching position to become a freelance artist, and in this role he achieved substantial success. In 1886, Wain's first drawing of anthropomorphised cats was published in the Christmas issue of the Illustrated London News, titled "A Kittens' Christmas Party". Dr. H.

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Olivier Levasseur Olivier Levasseur (1688 or 1690 – 7 July 1730), was a pirate, nicknamed La Buse (The Buzzard) or La Bouche (The Mouth) in his early days, called thus because of the speed and ruthlessness with which he always attacked his enemies. History[edit] Born at Calais during the Nine Years' War (1688–97) to a wealthy bourgeois family, he became a naval officer after receiving an excellent education. During the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714), he procured a Letter of Marque from king Louis XIV and became a privateer for the French crown. When the war ended he was ordered to return home with his ship, but instead joined the Benjamin Hornigold pirate company in 1716. Levasseur proved himself a good leader and shipmate, although he already had a scar across one eye limiting his sight.

One red paperclip The paperclip that Kyle MacDonald traded for a house. The website One red paperclip was created by Canadian blogger Kyle MacDonald, who bartered his way from a single red paperclip to a house in a series of fourteen online trades over the course of a year.[1] MacDonald was inspired by the childhood game Bigger, Better, and the site received a considerable amount of notice for tracking the transactions. "A lot of people have been asking how I've stirred up so much publicity around the project, and my simple answer is: 'I have no idea'", he told the BBC.[2] Trading timeline[edit]

Gautama Buddha Hatred does not cease by hatred, but only by love. This is the eternal rule. Gautama Buddha (c. 563 – c. 483 BC) was a teacher and religious leader. "Buddha", meaning "awakened one" or "enlightened one" is a title, not a name; the Shakyamuni Buddha, whose original name was Siddhartha Gautama, was the founder of Buddhism. See also Dhammapada List of notable trees The following is a list of notable trees from around the world. Trees listed here are regarded as important or specific by its historical, national, locational, natural or mythological context. The list includes actual trees located throughout the world, as well as trees from myths and trees from fiction. Real forests and individual trees[edit] Africa[edit] 60 segundos que cambiarán tu vida 60 segundos que cambiarán tu vida Escoge una industria y entra en la vida de un animal por solo un minuto: 1. Circos Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on google_plusone_share Share on email

Olga of Kiev Saint Olga (Old Church Slavonic: Ольга, hypothetically Old Norse: Helga[1] born c. 890 died 11 July 969, Kiev) was a ruler of Kievan Rus' as regent (945–c. 963) for her son, Svyatoslav. Early life[edit] Olga was a Pskov woman of Varangian extraction who married the future Igor of Kiev, arguably in 903. The Primary Chronicle gives 879 as her date of birth, which is rather unlikely, given the fact that her only son was probably born some 65 years after that date. After Igor's death, she ruled Kievan Rus as regent (945-c. 963) for their son, Svyatoslav.

VY Canis Majoris VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) is a red hypergiant in the constellation Canis Major. It is one of the largest known stars by radius and also one of the most luminous of its type. It is approximately 1,420 ± 120 solar radii[8] (equal to 6.6 astronomical units, thus a diameter about 1,975,000,000 kilometres (1.227×109 mi)), and about 1.2 kiloparsecs (3,900 light-years) distant from Earth. Create animated GIFs with your iPhone/iTouch or Webcam GIFYO iPhone & iTouch App Login or Register 1 Gifs 0 Likes Gonzalo-Del-Cant 11hr ago James Barry James Miranda Stuart Barry (c. 1789-1799 – 25 July 1865, born Margaret Ann Bulkley), was a military surgeon in the British Army. After graduation from the University of Edinburgh Medical School, Barry served in India and Cape Town, South Africa. By the end of his career, he had risen to the rank of Inspector General in charge of military hospitals. In his travels he not only improved conditions for wounded soldiers, but also the conditions of the native inhabitants.

Giant isopod A giant isopod is any of the almost 20 species of large isopods (crustaceans related to the shrimp and crabs) in the genus Bathynomus. Bathynomus giganteus, the species upon which the generitype is based, is often considered the largest isopod in the world, though other comparably poorly known species of Bathynomus may reach a similar size (e.g., B. kensleyi).[1] French zoologist Alphonse Milne-Edwards was the first[2] to describe the genus in 1879[3] after fishing a juvenile male B. giganteus from the Gulf of Mexico; this was an exciting discovery for both scientists and the public, as at the time the idea of a lifeless or "azoic" deep ocean had only recently been refuted by the work of Sir Charles Wyville Thomson and others. Females were not recovered until 1891. Giant isopods are of little interest to most commercial fisheries owing to the typical scarcity of catches and because ensnared isopods are usually scavenged beyond marketability before they are recovered.

Lucretia Lucretia (/lʊˈkriːʃə/; died c. 510 BC (traditionally)) is a semi-legendary figure in the history of the Roman Republic. According to the story, told mainly by two turn-of-the-millennium historians, the Roman Livy and the Greek historian Dionysius of Halicarnassus (who lived in Rome at the time of the Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus), her rape by the Etruscan king's son and consequent suicide were the immediate cause of the revolution that overthrew the monarchy and established the Roman Republic. The beginning of the Republic is marked by the first appearance of the two consuls elected on a yearly basis. The Romans recorded events by consular year, keeping an official list in various forms called the fasti, used by Roman historians.

Anekdote zur Senkung der Arbeitsmoral Anekdote zur Senkung der Arbeitsmoral ("Anecdote concerning the Lowering of Productivity" in Leila Vennewitz' translation[1]) is a famous short story by Heinrich Böll about an encounter between an enterprising tourist and a small fisherman, in which the tourist suggests how the fisherman can improve his life.[2] It was written for a May Day programme on the Norddeutscher Rundfunk in 1963, and is considered one of the best stories written by Heinrich Böll.[3] Plot[edit] The story is set in an unnamed harbor on the west coast of Europe.[1] A smartly-dressed enterprising tourist is taking photographs when he notices a shabbily dressed local fisherman taking a nap in his fishing boat.

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