background preloader

Silent rooftop wind turbines could generate half of a household's energy needs

Silent rooftop wind turbines could generate half of a household's energy needs
Small wind turbines scaled to the right size for residential and urban areas have so far lived in the shadows of their larger wind-farm-sized counterparts. The power output has been too low for a reasonable return on investment through energy savings and the noise they produce is louder than most homeowners can deal with. A Dutch renewable energy start-up called The Archimedes is working to solve both of those problems in a new class of small-scale wind turbine -- one that is almost silent and is far more efficient at converting wind into energy. The company states that the Liam F1 turbine could generate 1,500 kWh of energy per year at wind speeds of 5m/s, enough to cover half of an average household's energy use. When used in combination with rooftop solar panels, a house could run off grid. "When there is wind you use the energy produced by the wind turbine; when the sun is shining you use the solar cells to produce the energy," The Archimedes CEO Richard Ruijtenbeek said.

http://www.treehugger.com/wind-technology/silent-wind-turbines-could-generate-half-household-energy.html

Related:  Wind EnergyWindEnergyFotografia

SheerWind's INVELOX Wind Turbine Can Generate 600% More Energy Than Conventional Turbines US-based wind energy company SheerWind just unveiled the INVELOX – a tunnel-based wind turbine that can produce up to 600% more power than traditional wind turbines. The company states that after extensive field-testing, their new INVELOX turbine “significantly outperforms the traditional turbine” and could reduce installation capital costs to less than $750 per KW. The INVELOX energy system works by capturing ground-level breezes and funneling them through a tapering passageway that naturally accelerates wind flow. Unlike other turbines, it also minimizes environmental and animal impact, and it requires no government subsidies to be profitable.

This Silent Rooftop Turbine Could Generate Half of Your Home's Energy The news: While wind power is one of the cleanest sources of renewable energy in the world — and the top source for new U.S. electricity generation as of 2012 — many people still take issue with turbines and their noise. Though some people living near turbines say that the low hum doesn't cause much trouble, others report daily annoyance, with some controversially linking the noise to physical ailments. But a Dutch company called Archimedes has set out to change that mindset by releasing the Liam F1 Urban Wind Turbine, a $5,400 model set to roll out next January. IBM solar collector magnifies sun by 2,000x (without cooking itself), costs 3x less than similar systems Cleverly combining solar PV with solar thermal to reach 80% conversion efficiency Concentrating the sun's ray onto solar photovoltaic (PV) modules requires walking the fine line between optimizing power output and not literally melting your very expensive super-high-efficiency solar cells. A team led by IBM Research seems to have found a way to push back the line. They have created a High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns onto hundreds of triple junction photovoltaic chips measuring a single square centimeter each (they even claim to be able to keep temperatures safe up to 5,000x).

Home Made Wind Turbine Want to build a wind turbine for your home? I have gathered several PDFs for those who want to build there own wind turbines and have links to them at the bottom of this post. They cover all types of wind turbines and issues that you may run in to such as wind speeds and noise. 'Wind trees' could replace controversial giant turbines in race for sustainable energy An artificial 'wind tree' has been created to generate electricity from even the slightest flow of air. Jérôme Michaud-Larivière, founder of the Paris-based start-up NewWind, has created Tree Wind and plans to market the invention next year. The eight-metre high (25ft) tree consists of a steel trunk, from which extend branches holding 100 plastic 'leaves', AFP reports. "The idea came to me in a square where I saw the leaves tremble when there was not a breath of air."

This Weird, Massive Tower May Be the Future of Energy in the U.S. The news: The country's largest freestanding structure will soon start construction — and it's going to be a solar-wind tower. Projected to reach 2,250 feet, it will be considerably taller than other American landmarks like the 1,454-foot Empire State Building. Designed by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Tower Inc., the solar-wind hybrid facility just secured funding to build its first model, which is projected to stand near San Luis, Ariz., by 2018. How it works: A network of sprayers emits a fine mist of water droplets over the upper lip of the structure; the mist subsequently evaporates, absorbing the ambient heat of the surrounding atmosphere (that's the solar component).

New aluminum air battery could blow past lithium-ion, runs on water As battery technologies go, the world has a love-hate relationship with lithium-ion. On the one hand, breakthroughs in Li-ion designs and construction are responsible for the Tesla Model S, new installations, green energy research, and the modern smartphone. On the other hand, lithium-ion limitations are the reason why most EVs have a range of 40-60 miles, the Model S costs upwards of $80,000, and why your smartphone can’t last all day on a single charge. For all its promise and capability, lithium-ion has limited long-term utility — which is why a new announcement from Fuji Pigment is so interesting.

Making a simple Savonius wind turbine by Lance Turner There are many situations where you might need a small amount of electricity, for instance running gate openers, safety lights, water level indicators and other low-power devices. While solar would seem like the ideal solution, quite often this is not possible due to location and shading problems. Just such a situation arose when I decided to make our new gates automatic. There were just too many trees in the way for solar power to work, and I didn’t want to run power some 30 metres or so from the house, as it would have meant digging a trench for the cables, which is almost impossible in our rocky ground. Why have automatic gates anyway?

Related: