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The fashion business - BBC News

The fashion business - BBC News
Image copyright AFP We know that clothing is big business, but it may be surprising just how big. The fashion industry's contribution to the British economy is an estimated £26bn - that's twice the size of the car industry's and nearly as big as the contribution from housing, according to the British Fashion Council. It is not just dresses and handbags, but also design and manufacturing that make the sector the largest part of the so-called creative industries, which include marketing, etc. It's an important part of the services sector that makes up around four-fifths of the economy. And services has powered the economic recovery, which I have written about before. I wrote then that it was a tougher sector to picture than say manufacturing cars which is tangible. But a couple of times a year during London Fashion Week, it is visible as models wear dresses that embody design as they sashay down the catwalk. It's also an industry that has taken to social media to reach that market.

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