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Materiales de “Gamificación en la educación y la formación”

Materiales de “Gamificación en la educación y la formación”

http://www.socialbiblio.com/materiales-de-gamificacion-en-la-educacion-y-la-formacion/

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Play to Learn: 100 Great Sites on Gamification Using incentives to encourage students to stay interested in educational pursuits is not a new idea. However, the incorporation of game mechanics, incentive systems, and other ideas borrowed from the game world to create a game-layer on top of existing educational systems is revolutionary, and many educators, students, and entrepreneurs are taking notice. Gamification of education can help students be more motivated and engaged, and can make it easier to remember what they’ve learned. What teacher wouldn’t love that? Enthusiastic teachers from K-12 all the way up into college have started using game-based learning techniques in their classrooms, and there are loads of learning opportunities online for students who prefer a game-like experience. Many companies are working on gamification platforms to make it easier to implement incentive programs and game mechanics in classrooms, online courses, and even in employee training and career development settings.

The Gamification of Education Infographic Gamification Infographics Gamification has tremendous potential in the education space. How can we use it to deliver truly meaningful experiences to students? - What elements of gaming can we harness for educational purposes? The Gamification of Training Rote learning--using a mechanical or habitual repetition of something to be learned--is dead. Gamification is the new star in training. The business world is convinced: a 2011 Gartner report suggested 70% of Global 2000 organizations would be using gamified applications by this year. We’re in a new era of play-based training—fun, video-game inspired learning that not only "hooks" learners but better prepares them with the skills they need to perform their jobs well. The case is simple and compelling: games engage some of the most basic human instincts, and people like playing them. In fact, according to a report by Spil Games (PDF), 1.2 billion people in the world were playing video games last year.

Made With Play: Game-Based Learning Resources Resources by Topic: Intrigued by game-based learning, but not sure where to begin? Edutopia's series takes a look at game-like learning principles in action and commercial games in real classrooms -- and offers tips and tools for bringing them into your own practice. The Made With Play series is a co-production with Institute of Play; visit their website for many more resources around game-based learning for both educators and parents, including a comprehensive games and learning reading list (PDF). These videos were made possible through generous support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

10 Ways to Use Google Sites with Your Students April 18, 2014 Google Sites is one of the best website creation software I have been recommending for teachers. There are a wide variety of reasons why Google Sites is an ideal platform to host your class website and here are some of them: Google Sites is easy to use and has a student friendly interface.You can set up your website within minutes without the need for any HMTL or CSS knowledge.It provides highly customizable themes that you can easily apply to your site.It is integrated with some other Google serves like Google Calendar.Google Sites has a wonderful web-based editor that allows you to easily create, edit and share you content.It provides a set of collaborative features including multiple editors and commenting.Inserting images, videos, and other multimedia materials is ridiculously easy.It provides a modest cloud storage capacity for you to upload documents, files, attachments, and PDFs.And it is FREE.

5 Differences Between Education Games and the Gamification of Education Posted onApril 14, 2014byKristen DiCerbo Gamification is generally defined as the use of game design elements in non-game contexts. Last week, Knewton released an infographic touting the benefits of gamification. However, the evidence provided was overwhelmingly about the use of games, NOT gamification. Interestingly, a lot of their argument comes from the MIT Education Arcade. This is a great group who makes… games! 8 Ways to Use Games in Education Gamification is found in many contexts these days, but none more prevalent than in the K-12 education environment. Classrooms are leveraging apps, point systems, leader-boards, badges, and everything between to make their content more dynamic. Truth is, gamification itself is not very new, but the tools that we have available that have increased its popularity, tablets and APIs in particular. With all of the possibilities offered by gamification, it can be difficult to determine the best way to use it.

What is Gamification? Gamification is the concept of applying game mechanics and game design techniques to engage and motivate people to achieve their goals.[1] Gamification taps into the basic desires and needs of the users impulses which revolve around the idea of Status and Achievement. The research company Gartner predicts that by 2015, a gamified service for consumer goods marketing and customer retention will become as important as Facebook, eBay, or Amazon, and more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified application. [2] History The oldest example of gamification are Frequent Flyer Programs that airline companies offer as a part of their customer loyalty programs. Gamification was a term that was first coined in 2003 by Nick Pelling, but did not gain popularity until 2010.[3] The term gamification began to gather interest and a following in 2010 when companies such as Badgeville started using it to describe their behavior platforms.

Ideas for Using Minecraft in the Classroom As is the nature of sandbox games, players can roam free, choosing objectives as they go. Because Minecraft has such open possibilities and potential, the teacher can choose how he or she wants to use it. Just as the student has the ability to be creative, the teacher has the same.

How to Create a Learning Video They’ll Want to Watch Hiring Mark Zuckerberg to deliver a workshop or run a retreat is not always the most practical or cost-effective solution. Know what’s not impractical? Bringing thousands of today’s industry leaders and visionaries to your employees through short-form video to share the lessons they’ve learned through triumphs and failures in their own careers. 9 Techniques For Online Educators To Gamify Their Digital Classrooms Involve and motivate your students into the process of online learning with the help of gamification. Check what gamification is, and what gamification techniques you can use as online educator to make your digital classroom more interesting for your online students. Check the following 9 techniques that will help you gamify your digital classroom.

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