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Facebook use 'makes people feel worse about themselves'

Facebook use 'makes people feel worse about themselves'
15 August 2013Last updated at 09:11 ET The study found people spent more time on Facebook when they were feeling lonely Using Facebook can reduce young adults' sense of well-being and satisfaction with life, a study has found. Checking Facebook made people feel worse about both issues, and the more they browsed, the worse they felt, the University of Michigan research said. The study, which tracked participants for two weeks, adds to a growing body of research saying Facebook can have negative psychological consequences. Facebook has more than a billion members and half log in daily. "On the surface, Facebook provides an invaluable resource for fulfilling the basic human need for social connection. Internet psychologist Graham Jones, a member of the British Psychological Society who was not involved with the study, said: "It confirms what some other studies have found - there is a growing depth of research that suggests Facebook has negative consequences." Loneliness link Learning the rules

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