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Disability Social History Project - Timeline "Freak Shows" in the United States (1840-1940) How'd You Like to be a Giant? For one hundred years (1840 - 1940) the freak show was one of America's most popular forms of entertainment. Time line Click on the date to see related documents, then click on the documents to come back! 1564/William Shakespeare is born to John and Mary Shakespeare in the town of Stratford Upon Avon. Approximately 1570/William begins grammar school. A story often dismissed as wild fiction, that 18th-century grave robbers stole Shakespeare’s skull, appears to be true, archaeologists have said. The first archaeological investigation of Shakespeare’s grave at Holy Trinity church in Stratford-on-Avon has been carried out for a documentary to be broadcast by Channel 4 on Saturday. The most striking conclusion is that Shakespeare’s head appears to be missing and that the skull was probably stolen from what is a shallow grave by trophy hunters. Kevin Colls, the archaeologist who led the team, said the grave was not as they had expected. “We came across this very odd, strange thing at the head end.

Mother killed herself and daughter in car fire A single mother who was the focus of a sustained campaign of abuse from a gang of youths killed herself and her teenage daughter by setting her car on fire, an inquest heard yesterday. Fiona Pilkington, 38, committed suicide in October 2007 by parking in a lay-by in South Leicestershire with her daughter, Francecca, 18, dousing the back seat in petrol before setting it alight with both women still inside. The fumes in the car caused an explosion, destroying the Austin Maestro and killing Ms Pilkington, who was in the driver's seat next to her daughter. The pair had to be identified by matching DNA samples taken from relatives with swabs recovered from the scene.

How to make Shakespeare easy for English language learners Have you ever had difficulty relating Shakespeare to learners of English? Tutor and resource writer Genevieve White comes to the rescue, in time for Shakespeare Day and English Language Day today. Last year, I wrote an article extolling the joys of teaching Shakespeare to learners of English and outlining the reasons why teachers should bring the Bard into the classroom. Some of the comments I received on this post suggested that the linguistic challenges presented by sixteenth-century English are just too great to overcome. It is true that Shakespeare’s texts may present difficulties for contemporary readers, particularly those who do not have English as a first language. Luckily, however, there are a number of ways in which we can reduce the language barrier between our learners and Shakespeare’s greatest work.

Shakespeare grave scan shows playwright's skull was 'probably' stolen, archaeologists say A team of archaeologists has claimed that William Shakespeare's skull was "probably" stolen from its final resting place in his hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon, England. The conclusion brings new credence to a long-discredited claim that the skull was stolen from the playwright's grave by trophy hunters in 1794. "We came across this very odd, strange thing at the head end," lead archaeologist Kevin Colls, of Staffordshire University, told The Guardian. How the World Perceives the New American Dream The American dream has always been global. In 1931, when the historian James Truslow Adams first introduced the concept, he credited the dream with having “lured tens of millions of all nations to our shores.” Yet in recent years, a troubling gap has developed between this original dream and a new one that speaks far less eloquently to the rest of the world. The original dream has three strands.

Shakespeare's grave could be missing his skull, according to radar survey It may read 'cursed be he that moves my bones' on William Shakespeare's tombstone. But experts have concluded that it is possible the Bard's skull was stolen by trophy hunters over 200 years ago. Archaeologists using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) were able to look beneath the surface of what is widely thought to be the writer's grave - but they discovered 'an odd disturbance at the head end'.

What Is the American Dream Today? By Kimberly Amadeo Before looking at what the American Dream is today, we need to look at its roots. It has always said that the government will protect your opportunity to improve your life, no matter who you are. That was established by the Declaration of Independence.

The Language of Shakespeare Language Links | Home The most striking feature of Shakespeare is his command of language. It is all the more astounding when one not only considers Shakespeare's sparse formal education but the curriculum of the day. There were no dictionaries; the first such lexical work for speakers of English was compiled by schoolmaster Robert Cawdrey as A Table Alphabeticall in 1604. Although certain grammatical treatises were published in Shakespeare's day, organized grammar texts would not appear until the 1700s. Shakespeare as a youth would have no more systematically studied his own language than any educated man of the period. 15 Things You Might Not Know About 'Of Mice and Men' You probably spent some time as a teenager reading John Steinbeck’s novella Of Mice and Men. Even if you know about Lennie and George’s heartbreaking pursuit of life, liberty, and a hutch full of rabbits, there are a few things you might have missed about the iconic story during English class. Although he was a Stanford University graduate and had published five books by the time he wrote Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck had more in common with his itinerant main characters than readers might have expected. “I was a bindle-stiff myself for quite a spell,” the author told The New York Times in 1937, employing the now archaic nickname for migrant workers. “I worked in the same country that the story is laid in.” With Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck wanted to tell the story of a community largely unheralded in literature and high culture.

Are Shakespeare's works written in Old English? Are Shakespeare's works written in Old English? Shakespeare's complex sentence structures and use of now obsolete words lead many students to think they are reading Old or Middle English. In fact, Shakespeare's works are written in Early Modern English. Once you see a text of Old or Middle English you'll really appreciate how easy Shakespeare is to understand (well, relatively speaking). Take, for example, this passage from the most famous of all Old English works, Beowulf:

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