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Learning System

https://learn.adafruit.com/category/learn-raspberry-pi

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s Raspberry Pi Lesson 11. DS18B20 Temperature Sensing @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi January 29, 2013 AT 8:28 am Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 11. DS18B20 Temperature Sensing @ The Adafruit Learning System. The Occidentalis Linux distribution for Raspberry Pi (and Raspbian as of Dec 2012) includes support for the DS18B20 1-wire temperature sensor. NOOBS Setup To get started with Raspberry Pi you need an operating system. NOOBS (New Out Of the Box Software) is an easy operating system install manager for the Raspberry Pi. Buy a preinstalled SD Card The easiest way to get NOOBS is to buy an SD card with NOOBS preinstalled, available for £4 at the Swag Store. Alternatively, if you have an SD card (8GB recommended), then you can download NOOBS for free and install it on your card. Download

How to create a time lapse video with Raspberry Pi After installing a Pi camera module and capturing pictures and videos with raspistill and raspivid commands, I wanted to create a time lapse video of the nice scenery that I have in the back of my apartment. For those who don't know what it is, time-lapse video (or often-called time-lapse photography) is a shooting technique where contiguous photo frames of a changing scene are captured for an extended period of time in a much lower rate than a typical video frame rate. When the collected frames are played back in a faster frame rate, it creates a so-called "time-lapsing" effect. You might already have seen stunning looking night-to-day time-lapses or fast moving clouds on TV. In this project, I use the following items to create a case for Raspberry Pi and Picam module before capturing time lapse sequences with them.

GPIO Library Update: 14th May, 2013 wiringPi version 2 has been released and now has its own website ( to look after it. Most of the documentation on the projects site has been copied over to it the new site, but there may still be 1 or 2 pages that are still missing. I’d encourage you to use the new site if possible where there will be a forum and wiki (when I get time to implement them!) WiringPi is an Arduino wiring-like library written in C and released under the GNU LGPLv3 license which is usable from C and C++ and many other languages with suitable wrappers (See below) You may be familiar with the Arduino… Briefly; Arduino is really two things; one is a hardware platform, the other software, and part of the software is a package called Wiring.

Five Basic Raspberry Pi Projects At $35, the Raspberry Pi is almost an impulse purchase. Once its in your hands, its basic nature calls out for it to be used in some great projects. While its always tempting to jump in and build something completely mindblowing, it pays to start with a few easy projects and learn the system before jumping in to the deep end and experiencing frustration. Easy Project Criteria Controlling LEDs with Scratch on Raspberry Pi Scratch is a great programming environment for people of all ages, as it allows the total beginner to create all sorts of interactive programs and fun with a simple graphical environment. You can also run Scratch on a Raspberry Pi, and to make things even more interesting you can now control the GPIO pins from Scratch with the help of the instructions by Scractchmypi. By using a modified version of Scratch, new instrions are available to control the GPIO pins, and thus have some blinky fun with LEDs or perhaps control items of a more serious nature. Either way, it adds to the fun and gives teachers an option to explore basic electronics - so visit the instruction page to learn how.

Robotics Programming Tutorial: How to Program a Simple Robot Let’s face it, robots are cool. They’re also going to run the world someday, and hopefully at that time they will take pity on their poor soft fleshy creators (AKA robotics developers) and help us build a space utopia filled with plenty. I’m joking of course, but only sort of. In my ambition to have some small influence over the matter, I took a course in autonomous robot control theory last year, which culminated in my building a simulator that allowed me to practice control theory on a simple mobile robot. In this article, I’m going to describe the control scheme of my simulated robot, illustrate how it interacts with its environment and achieves its goals, and discuss some of the fundamental challenges of robotics programming that I encountered along the way.

Raspberry pi – Setting up auto-login and auto-loading the gui Home > How To, Raspberry pi, Technology > Raspberry pi – Setting up auto-login and auto-loading the gui Setting up Auto-Login In the GUI left click in the bottom left hand corner on the blue cross to display the options menu (Like the start button in windows) Go up to “other” and then scroll down the list until you get to “terminal” and left click You should now see the “terminal” window which is just like a cmd box in windows and enter the following command DIY WiFi Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Camera This project explores the Adafruit PiTFT touchscreen and the Raspberry Pi camera board to create a simple point-and-shoot digital camera. One can optionally use WiFi and Dropbox (a cloud file storage and synchronization service) to automatically transfer photos to another computer for editing. This isn’t likely to replace your digital camera (or even phone-cam) anytime soon…it’s a simplistic learning exercise and not a polished consumer item…but as the code is open source, you or others might customize it into something your regular camera can’t do. Raspberry Pi computer, either the Model B or Model AWith Ethernet and two USB ports, the Model B is usually easier to set up. The Model A saves a few bucks and uses less power…but with only one USB port and no Ethernet, it requires some added skill and/or shenanigans to get all the software fully loaded.PiTFT Mini Kit — TFT+Touchscreen for Raspberry PiRaspberry Pi Camera Board.

10 Engaging Python projects 10 Engaging Python Projects is a series of worksheets I have produced to introduce Key Stage 2 and 3 students to the world of the Raspberry Pi and programming in Python. I started creating some worksheets for my own school Pi club and then thought - why not make it into a free iBook. The iBook is free and will also be available as a PDF if requested by schools. The projects are available in an iBook format for Mac and iPad from the Apple iBook Store here The projects are based around the Traffic Light Kit available from CPC for £4.79 including VAT and can be bought here A draft of the booklet can be downloaded here Remote programming of mini PC like Raspberry Pi or Beaglebone Black Programming on mini PC like Raspberry Pi, or Beaglebone Black maybe bit annoying or hard due to lack of some more complex IDEs not available on ARM platform, or just to resource heavy to such computers. Sometimes you may also lack keyboard, mouse and a display to connect to them. In such cases remote access and remote programming may be a solution. All you need is a network connection and proper applications and protocols.

bcm2835: C library for Broadcom BCM 2835 as used in Raspberry Pi This is a C library for Raspberry Pi (RPi). It provides access to GPIO and other IO functions on the Broadcom BCM 2835 chip, allowing access to the GPIO pins on the 26 pin IDE plug on the RPi board so you can control and interface with various external devices. It provides functions for reading digital inputs and setting digital outputs, using SPI and I2C, and for accessing the system timers. Pin event detection is supported by polling (interrupts are not supported). It is C++ compatible, and installs as a header file and non-shared library on any Linux-based distro (but clearly is no use except on Raspberry Pi or another board with BCM 2835). The version of the package that this documentation refers to can be downloaded from You can find the latest version at

Using the Dagu Mini Driver to Build a Raspberry Pi Camera Robot A Raspberry Pi with a camera, gives you a small, low cost, embedded vision system, but it’s not very mobile. In this tutorial we show you how to fix that by attaching it to a robot to give you a Raspberry Pi camera robot! The robot is WiFi enabled which means you can drive it around using a tablet, phone or computer, using the camera to explore remote areas. We’ve tried to keep the components for this tutorial as affordable as possible, and as such we’re using the Dagu Arduino Mini Driver to control the motors and servos of the robot. This board also contains a 1A voltage regulator which we can use to power the Pi.

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