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Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution!

Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution!

https://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution

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Strategies & Activities Looking for Strategies and Activities? Click Here! In this section of the site, the aim is to provide teachers with examples of activities they can use to increase the amount of Getting it/Using it activities in their repertoire. We believe in the sharing of ideas between teachers as the idea is not to create the most original lesson, but the most effective one for student learning; as such, we invite you to browse through the different activity sections and use any activities or resources that you feel would be useful. Best of Bilash believes in purposeful teaching; that means that no activity is used ‘just because’.

30 Techniques to Quiet a Noisy Class One day, in front 36 riotous sophomores, I clutched my chest and dropped to my knees like Sergeant Elias at the end of Platoon. Instantly, dead silence and open mouths replaced classroom Armageddon. Standing up like nothing had happened, I said, "Thanks for your attention -- let's talk about love poems." Bill Rogers Behaviour Management I came across Bill Rogers‘ work on behaviour management early in my career. I started working in some really tough schools. In some ways, it was lucky, because it made the rest of my career less challenging and prepared me for my very first principal’s role in 1995 (teaching principal), at a school with a teacher turnover rate of 400% over the two years prior to my starting.

How to Respond to Rude Comments About Teaching When I’m at social gatherings, I often meet non-teachers who ask me questions about teaching. The vast majority of these people are kind and gracious. They’ll tell me about a teacher they had that impacted them positively, or will ask my opinion on thoughtful questions about education. Character Resources - Let It Ripple When we starting making our first film on character two years ago, called The Science of Character, we talked to countless researchers and educators, and searched across the web and found all sorts of wonderful resources, but we couldn't find one place that aggregated all the ideas around character from different perspectives. So, we decided to start to build one. This catalogue of over 1,600 articles, lessons plans, tools, research, books, films, apps, websites, and games to dive deeper into all the different character strengths and approaches to character development is just the beginning of this journey. We hope you will send ideas to us for each section so that we can grow this together. We are also seeking partners and funds to make this Character Resource Hub as current and beautiful as it can be. At this point we have focused mostly on populating the information.

10 TED Talks Every Art Teacher Should Watch Hopefully, when I tell you I have been watching Ted Talks non-stop for a month, you know I am talking about the short, inspiring videos and not the rude, crude talking bear. TED Talks started back in 1984 when a conference was held for Technology, Entertainment, and Design. Speakers were challenged to present powerful speeches in under 18 minutes. Since then, it has grown into a national movement with one mission– to spread ideas. My first TED talk happened to be by Matt Cutts with his challenge to do something new for 30 days. It was only 3 minutes and 27 seconds long, but it had me hooked on the idea of watching a new TED talk every day for a month.

Five psychological findings every history teacher should know This text is somewhere between what I planned to say and what I did say during my session at the Historical Association’s annual conference in Bristol yesterday, with a few reflections in italics. I’m going to start with a couple of stories from the pillar of the local free press: Hackney Today. As one of only a handful of local authorities still publishing a paper fortnightly, and having recently been instructed to cease doing so by central government, this is not an opportunity to be missed. Particularly with stories like this one, a few months ago:

Can reading make you smarter? When I was eight years old, I still couldn't read. I remember my teacher Mrs Browning walking over to my desk and asking me to read a few sentences from a Dick and Jane book. She pointed to a word. "Tuh-hee," I said, trying to pronounce it.

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