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Productivity 101: A Primer to the Getting Things Done (GTD) Philosophy

Productivity 101: A Primer to the Getting Things Done (GTD) Philosophy
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fastcompany One thing uniting the most high-power leaders with the lowest-level workers is time: Day in and day out, we all have the same amount of it. Where the variation comes in is how we use it. Some of the most successful people tend to attribute their achievements at least partly to time management. 1. The most productive people can zero in on what will bring them the greatest return for time spent. Becoming more productive and—arguably the bigger challenge—staying that way means gravitating toward work that may be uncomfortable and difficult and outsourcing what's easy and familiar. 2. It may not surprise you to learn that a common theme among the most productive people is that they're early risers. 3. Forget the myth of multitasking. 4. It's easy to imagine some of the most successful people as freewheeling thinkers who switch from one thing to the next according to instinct. 5. 6. Meetings are notorious for chewing up valuable time. 7. Get The Best Stories In Leadership Every Day.

15 Incredible 'Aha!' Moments: How Famous Founders and Inventors Got Started (infographic) How do you come up with new business ideas? If you're like Steve Jobs, Brad Pitt or Brian Chesky, inspiration and those magical "Aha!" moments come from a place everyone can access: everyday life. San Francisco's Funders and Founders took a look at how super successful people have found that one thing that took them from struggling to industry icons. Microsoft founder Bill Gates, for example, had a huge Aha! GoPro founder Nick Woodman was inspired to invent a sturdier adventure camera when he wanted to take pictures of himself surfing. Sara Blakely started out in sales and though she liked the support of pantyhose, she hated the way they looked with open-toed shoes. See how other great inventors, famous founders and super successful people got inspired and came up with the ideas they'll go down for in history in the infographic below: Click to enlarge

How to Organize and Focus Your Life Using OmniFocus - iOS Etc This is my story of how I started to organize and bring focus to my life using OmniFocus and “Getting Things Done” by David Allen. I have all kinds of future projects due at work and home, and they keep piling up before my very eyes. I have to remember to do all these things for family events that happen a few times a week. My daughter just brought home a list of things they need to bring to school from now until the last day of school. Including favorite stuffed animal day, crazy hair day and wear your pajamas to school day. Sounds like a lot? How did I stumble upon OmniFocus? I use to lay awake every night thinking about all the things that I needed to do the next day, or the laundry list of things that I have forgotten to do over the past few nights (funny enough, it included laundry too). This system is explained in a book called “Getting Things Done” by David Allen. Until I found OmniFocus. What is this OmniFocus you speak of? The Only Con The conclusion is…

9 Powerful Habits for Getting Important Things Done We all know that sinking feeling. A deadline is drawing closer and you haven't even started yet. You begin to panic and a dull nausea sets in. There is nothing worse than having two hours remaining to complete a project that you know will take more like five. You sit there saying to yourself, "Why didn't I get this started yesterday?" or "What the heck happened to the time?" Wouldn't it be great to build the habits that will get you working on that project well before it is due so this never happens again? 1. Do you have a long laundry list of things you have to accomplish? 2. Sometimes, taking the opposite approach works best: Take on all the easy and smaller things on your list and save that huge project for last. 3. When we constantly bash ourselves for not living up to our own high expectations, we make ourselves feel even more defeated and less likely to produce anything at all. 4. 5. 6. It's true: People who exercise regularly have greater willpower and are more effective. 7. 8.

lifehack For many of us these days it seems like we have thousands of things to do and never enough time to get to them all. No matter how many things we get done the list just keeps getting longer. The reality is that we’re likely wasting time on many things that are not accomplishing our main goals. 1. How often do you start the day by checking your email only to find 10 new things people want you to do? Instead of starting the day by seeing what everyone else thinks is important for you decide what your top task is before you leave the office or go to bed. 2. Of course we want to keep those close to us happy. Don’t always say yes. 3. I know you want to do things the right way but the problem is that right so often turns in to perfect and that’s a recipe to never get things finished. Perfect isn’t ever going to happen, it’s an entirely unattainable moving target. Alternatively finish the project and launch it. 4. 5. All you’re going to get out of a book you’re not enjoying is annoyed. 6. 7. 8.

The Learning Myth: Why I'll Never Tell My Son He's Smart | Salman Khan My 5-year-­old son has just started reading. Every night, we lay on his bed and he reads a short book to me. Inevitably, he'll hit a word that he has trouble with: last night the word was "gratefully." Researchers have known for some time that the brain is like a muscle; that the more you use it the more it grows. However, not everyone realizes this. The good news is that mindsets can be taught; they're malleable. I really want to start a national conversation that examines how we as a society can help people develop a growth mindset. And now here's a surprise for you.

Common OmniFocus Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them - Learn OmniFocus Did you start out using OmniFocus with a great deal of enthusiasm, but end up getting bogged down along the way? For years I’ve had the privilege of providing OmniFocus coaching and consulting to people all over the world. When people contact me for the first time they often compliment OmniFocus’ outstanding design, and quickly add that they don’t feel like they’re using it as effectively as they could be. Based on these experiences, here’s a synopsis of the the most common pitfalls that people tend to encounter when using OmniFocus. Issue: OmniFocus Has Become a Dumping Ground Overview The most common issue that I observe is people trying to use OmniFocus for too many things. Best Practices I recommend that you reserve OmniFocus for projects and actions that you’re committed to completing and that you store ideas, project support material and incomplete thoughts elsewhere, referencing them from OmniFocus, as needed, to make sure that they’re not forgotten. Resources

Take Ownership of Your Actions by Taking Responsibility Are you stalled in a project at work, waiting on someone else to take initiative to get things moving? Are you in a broken professional relationship — with a manager, coworker, or employee — hoping the other person assumes blame and fixes the issue? Are you looking for an easy way to get focused or improve your productivity — a silver bullet from an unexpected source? One of the most common momentum killers I’ve seen in my professional life is our propensity to wait for someone else to act, take initiative, assume blame, or take charge. But very often, no help comes. One year ago, I heard Tal Ben-Shahar speak about this concept; he learned it from Nathaniel Branden, the father of the self-esteem movement. It’s a liberating concept. This may be particularly important for young leaders, often characterized as a coddled generation. But leaders of all ages could afford to act as if help is not coming more often. Often, we have to deal with situations for which we’re not at fault.

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