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Class Discussion to Encourage Critical Thinking: Resources for Grades 9-12

Class Discussion to Encourage Critical Thinking: Resources for Grades 9-12
About Socratic Seminars Socratic Seminars: Patience & Practice <img class="media-image media-element file-content-image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/73/video.gif?itok=pmoQLTDv" alt="" /> (Teaching Channel, 2013) At Mountain View High School in Mountain View, California, teacher Paige Price discusses how she uses Socratic Seminars in her classroom to address the question, “What’s the purpose of poetic language?” Make sure to check out the supporting materials related to the featured activities, including scoring and student preparation guides. How KIPP Teachers Learn to Teach Critical Thinking <img class="media-image media-element file-content-image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/73/video.gif? Back to Top Downloads from Schools that Work More Blogs About Class Discussion

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Developing Critical Thinking Skills in Children Children are confronted daily with rich opportunities to solve problems and exercise their own independent judgment when they're given the chance to safely explore the world. These problems, which might involve physical challenges, social relationship issues, or understanding how things work, often seem minor to us but provide great opportunities to practice critical thinking skills. For example: 5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention If we hope to construct enduring understanding in our students, it's critical that, now more than ever, we know their strengths and interests. By incorporating students' strengths and weakness into authentic learning experiences from the beginning of each unit, while at the same time including opportunities for feedback, metacognition and revision, we promote a variety of cognitive and emotional benefits that can lead to academic success. For example, students with interpersonal learning strengths find that cooperative group work increases perseverance. Students with artistic, computer, dramatic or organizational skills benefit from appropriate opportunities to engage in building knowledge through their strengths and interests.

Critical Thinking Toolbox: How to Brainstorm Brainstorming is an essential part of critical thinking and a tool that people use to invent an idea, find a solution to a problem, or answer a question. Like: naming a puppy, or . . . Prehistoric Man: "I wonder why all the stars move around in the same way every night, except for just a few? Those few wander about from night to night." Critical Thinking about Critical Resources Critical resources, and the issues surrounding them, are themes woven through many of the International Geoscience Programme (IGCP) 2014 projects - highlighting its importance to the world’s economy and development. It is crucial to understand the geological occurrence, formation and mineral residence of critical elements, determine future resources, and quantify their global availability. A project funded through the IGCP aims to increase the knowledge on natural resources: IGCP 600: “Metallogeny of collision orogens”. This project brings together researchers from various scientific backgrounds, from different countries, at different stages of their career and promotes cooperation, knowledge exchange, and collaboration on researching Earth’s systems. Although nonrenewable resources underpin our economy and have greatly improved our quality of life, there are controversies surrounding extraction techniques and environmental damage, especially in Africa.

Resources to Help Promote Critical Thinking & Authentic Learning We had a lively session yesterday when Melissa Mallon of Wichita State University hosted Promoting Critical Thinking Through Authentic Learning Activities as part of our PD series. Many thanks to Melissa, and the hundreds of academic and K-12 librarians and educators who attended the session! Did have a chance to make the live session? Writing Discursive compositions (Secondary level) (Part I): Differences between discursive and argumentative essays I am going to start a series of blog posts on discursive writing at the secondary level, beginning with this post on the differences between discursive writing and argumentative writing. I hope that this series of post will benefit secondary school students in Singapore who have a strong interest in penning such essays but lack the technical and/or logical reasoning skills to write a remarkable piece of writing. Please note that discursive essays are at times known as “expository essays”, although I prefer to use the term “discursive”, and will be using this term for this blog. Discursive and argumentative essays are very different. For starters, let’s look at the obvious differences and defining signatures of discursive and argumentative essays in typical test and exam questions (Note: please click on the image for an enlarged, clearer version):

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change. That makes it a most precious “app” today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don’t seem to value questioning as much as we should. For the most part, in our workplaces as well as our classrooms, it is the answers we reward -- while the questions are barely tolerated.

What is Critical Thinking No one always acts purely objectively and rationally. We connive for selfish interests. We gossip, boast, exaggerate, and equivocate. It is "only human" to wish to validate our prior knowledge, to vindicate our prior decisions, or to sustain our earlier beliefs. In the process of satisfying our ego, however, we can often deny ourselves intellectual growth and opportunity. Life Skills Resources - Critical Thinking Article: Developing Critical Thinking Skills In this article from our life skills examples, Dr Sara Hannam discusses the importance of developing critical thinking skills and how we can teach these skills to university level students in the EAP (English for Academic Purposes) classroom. Read the article Lesson: Critical Thinking

How to Create a Bibliography in Google Documents One of the most useful new Add-ons for Google Documents is the EasyBib Bibliography Creator. The EasyBib Bibliography Creator makes it easy to properly cite resources and format a bibliography in APA, MLA, or Chicago style. The screenshots below provide directions for the process. (Click the images to view them in full size). The Power of "I Don't Know" The role of teaching has evolved. No longer are we the carriers of knowledge, giving it to students and assessing if they can repeat facts successfully. We are, instead, tasked with teaching students how to find answers themselves.

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