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What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn?

What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn?
Educators have lots of ideas about how to improve education, to better reach learners and to give students the skills they’ll need in college and beyond the classroom. But often those conversations remain between adults. The real test of any idea is in the classroom, though students are rarely asked about what they think about their education. A panel of seven students attending schools that are part of the “deeper learning” movement gave their perspective on what it means for them to learn and how educators can work to create a school culture that fosters creativity, collaboration, trust, the ability to fail, and perhaps most importantly, one in which students want to participate. Project-based learning is the norm among these students, but they also have a lot of ideas about what makes a good project work. Students want projects to be integrated across subjects, not separated by discipline. “Treat students like adults. Related

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/03/what-keeps-students-them-motivated-to-learn/

Related:  Critical ThinkingVeille et presse (milieu éducatif)InstructionalArticle Revue en anglais

Madeline Hunter's ITIP model Madeline Hunter's ITIP model for direct instruction Madeline Hunter developed a teacher "decision-making" model for planning instruction. Her model is called ITIP (Instructional Theory into Practice) and is widely used in school districts around the country and in Michigan. There are three categories which are considered basic to ITIP lesson design. When using Direct Instruction (DI) as the Framework for planning, the teacher increases his/her effectiveness by considering the following seven elements as they "bring alive" the content or as they "scaffold" the learning needs of the students. Teacher decision making is the basis of this approach to teaching.

Helping Students Fail: A Framework Helping Students Fail: A Framework by Terry Heick Ed note: This post is promoted by bettermarks, an adaptive math platform built around the idea of learning through mistakes. Why Kids Need to Tinker to Learn The Maker Movement has inspired progressive educators to bring more hands-on learning and tinkering into classrooms, and educator Gary Stager would like to see formal schooling be influenced by the Maker Movement, which has inspired young learners to tinker, to learn by doing, and take agency for their learning. One way teachers can incorporate the Maker Movement into the classroom is through project-based learning (PBL), and learning prompts should be “brief, ambiguous and immune to assessment,” Sager said at ISTE. “The best projects push up against the resistance of reality. They work or they don’t work.” Kids simply need a supportive environment to tinker with an idea long enough to make it work, Stager said. They don’t need to be burdened by explaining which stage of the inquiry process they’re demonstrating.

How Do You Survive the Co-teaching Marriage? Can educators really be expected to survive a “co-teaching marriage” if nearly half of real marriages end in divorce? It’s not easy. But with the right approach and hard work, I have found the answer is yes! Real synergy can be created where each co-teacher can feed off of the positive energy and ideas that they get from the other. This collegiality can be another major way teachers can enjoy their career, in addition to the satisfaction of seeing their students succeed. Here’s how to have a successful co-teaching experience: 3 Strategies to Give Students Authentic Audience @lindayollis Building authentic audience is an essential technique for 21st century teachers. Linda Yollis, a 27 year elementary teacher shares with us how she uses social media in the classroom. Using their class blog and teacher’s social media connections, Linda’s students write for the world. Let’s learn as Linda Yollis @lindayollis, classroom blogging extraordinaire, shares how she engages her students using blogging. Listen to Linda Yollis – Every Classroom Matters Show #49

Desirable Difficulties in the Classroom Over the last couple of decades, learning and memory researchers have become increasingly interested in bringing scientific findings out of the lab and into the classroom, where they can be implemented into teaching methods to produce more efficient and effective learning. In a nation mired in an educational crisis, there’s never been a better time or place to bridge the gap between modern scientific knowledge and outdated teaching techniques. One of the greatest insights in the last 20 years that has serious potential to improve classroom teaching has been Robert Bjork’s concept of desirable difficulties (Bjork, 1994; McDaniel & Butler, in press), which suggests that introducing certain difficulties into the learning process can greatly improve long-term retention of the learned material. In psychology studies thus far, these difficulties have generally been modifications to commonly used methods that add some sort of additional hurdle during the learning or studying process.

Safe Search Kids - powered by Google SafeSearch for Kids Online. Google for Kids Google has been providing SafeSearch resources for years, including the search tool on this website. It’s a way for Google Kids to do research more safely thanks to filtered results on search terms. The added bonus of our site is that we do not feature Google Ads in our search results. Search results using Safe Search Kids are the same as when using Google’s main website but with SafeSearch automatically activated for all search terms entered. Additional Google safe search engines you may be interested in using include Google Safe Images. Would You Know Deeper Learning If You Saw It? - Learning Deeply This post is by Libby Woodfin, a former teacher and school counselor and the director of publications for Expeditionary Learning. It's not as easy as you might think. Teachers have many tools at their disposal that can facilitate deeper learning--long-term projects, hands-on activities, and, often, new technologies. You'll often find find deeper learning in that context, but not always. You also may find deeper learning in the context of a more traditional classroom environment. In the end, it's not about any particular tool or "shiny object."

Forget About Learning Styles. Here’s Something Better. Tuesday, October 15, 2013 Whenever I speak to audiences about the science of learning, as I’ve been doing a lot this fall, one topic always comes up in the Q&A sessions that follow my talk: learning styles. Learning styles—the notion that each student has a particular mode by which he or she learns best, whether it’s visual, auditory or some other sense—is enormously popular. It’s also been thoroughly debunked. The scientific research on learning styles is “so weak and unconvincing,” concluded a group of distinguished psychologists in a 2008 review, that it is not possible “to justify incorporating learning-styles assessments into general educational practice.”

Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. If you would like to suggest another topic, please send it and a set of questions to begin the topic. book - The Differentiated Classroom, 2nd Edition by Carol Ann Tomlinson by Carol Ann Tomlinson Today more than ever, The Differentiated Classroom is a must-have staple for every teacher’s shelf and every school’s professional development collection. Today's classroom is more diverse, more inclusive, and more plugged into technology than ever before. In the update of her best-selling, classic work, Carol Ann Tomlinson offers a powerful and practical way to meet a challenge that is both very modern and completely timeless: how teachers can divide their time, resources, and efforts to effectively instruct so many students of various backgrounds, readiness and skill levels, and interests. With a perspective informed by advances in research and deepened by more than 15 years of implementation feedback in all types of schools, Tomlinson

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